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Full text of "Brethren Missionary Herald, The (1994)"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/brethrenmissiona56111carr 



Brt 










lume 56, 





(page 5) 



NATIONAL CONFERENCE 



CONFERENCE OF THE FELLOWSHIP OF, GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES 

JUly 23-29, 1994 
GRENELEFE RESORT AND CONFERENCE" CENTER-HiAINES CITY, FLORIDA 

THIS REGISTRATION FORM IS TO BE MAILED TO:^ '%&** 

F.G.B.C CONFERENCE REGISTRATIONS "r"™~~'~~~ ' 

P.O. BOX 386. .--- -' -^ «-^ "' 

WINONA LAKE flN 46590/ '*'<", \ "'%, 



LAST NAME. 

ADDRESS 

CITY 



"FIRST 



RHONE 



STATE.. 



ZIP 



CHILDREN 



PLEASE NAMES OF OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS ATTENDING CONFERENCE: 

SPOUSE "'" 

AGE a a (AS OF 7/1/94) 

5 < ■'- ■■-- "? y'T ■- -> / AGE / \±£1 t I • 

■"-,-> : ~ ^.'^^ -'". AGE" T"^ -"-"\ ;"■ '; 



A conference registration fee of $25 per persorvor $45 per couple should accompany this 
registration form. There is no additional charge for children. After May 15, 1994, the registration 
fee is $35 per person or $60 per couple. Plea^sejriake all cKec^payabie to Fellowship of Grace 

Brethren Churches. 

Do you plan to stay at Grenelefe/ pUrlCdnference Resort? " 
Lodging reservations must be made directly with Grenelefe. 



FOCUS Retreat Information 



Southeast Region 

Dates 

February 21-23, 1994 

Place 

Florida Leadership Training Center 
5000 Firetower Road 
Haines City, Fl 33844 

Cost 

$79 per person 
(meals included) 

Reservations 

Payment must be received 

by Jan. 28 in order to hold 

your reservation. 



Northwest Region 

Dates 

March 14-16, 1994 

Place 

Clear Lake Grace Brethren Camp 

11660TietonRd. 

White Pass, WA 98937 

Cost 

$20 per person 
(meals included) 

Reservations 

Payment must be received 

by Feb. 25 in order to hold 

your reservation. 



Northeast Region 

Dates 

April 11-13, 1994 

Place 

Sandy Cove 

P.O. Box B 

North East, MD 21901 

Cost 

$1 10 per person 
(meals included) 

Reservations 

Payment must be received 

by Jan. 15 in order to hold 

your reservation. 




| IGNITING NEW VISION | 

ncnsnr 



Mail reservation and check to: 

FOCUS II 

Attn: Patty Morris 

P.O. Box 335 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Tel. (2 1 9) 267-5 161 • FAX (2 1 9) 269-4066 



HERALD 



EDITORIAL 



Pursuing Excellence 



"N: 



by Jeff Carroll 



ow for this very 
reason also, ap- 
plying all dili- 
gence in your faith supply more excel- 
lence" (2 Peter 1:5). Excellence: We 
certainly know when it is not part of 
an organization's philosophy. We 
can spot it in decaying facilities, re- 
pairs not given attention, dirt on the 
carpet, personnel not instructed about 
the importance of a customer, lack of 

attention to details, quality put on the back burner. I 
guess it is the purveyance of a "just-get-by" philoso- 
phy which leads to institutionalized mediocrity. At 
the same time we are pleasantly surprised when as a 
customer we have been treated with great attention 
and legendary service. We get so excited about it that 
we tell all of our friends and the story gets better each 
time we tell it. 

Can I make an analogy? Think of your church 
in terms of a restaurant. After all, we are serving the 
"bread of life." How does the landscaping look? The 
nursery: what does it smell like? Sometimes your 
olfactory senses are placed on alert when you enter 
the front door. What's broken in the building? You 
may have walked pass it so often that you don't see 
it any longer. Is the carpet clean? What about the 
music and the message? Many people don't like 
yodelling! I used the restaurant analogy because we 
are all drawn to a fine restaurant and many factors 
enter into determining our favorite place. 

Now, McDonald's might not be your idea of 
"fine" dining, but that organization has attempted to 



get a handle on quality and excellence. Tom Peters, 
in doing research for his best-selling book, In Search 
of Excellence, interviewed a seventeen year old high 
school student employee and this is what the student 
noted about McDonald's: "What impressed me, look- 
ing back on it, was the quality of ingredients. McDon- 
ald's always uses prime beef — the best of everything. 
If french fries were overdone, we threw them out . . . if 
we punched holed in the buns with our thumbs (a 
frequent occurrence, 
especially for those 
new at the tough job 
of handling thou- 
sands of buns), we 
threw them out. 
The incredible 

thing to me is that 
here I am, 13 years 
later, and if I want 
fast food, I still go to 
McDonald's. French 
fries were their best 
product, I always 
thought." (He's in good company. Julia Childs loves 
McDonald's french fries, too.) 

Now folks, don't take the analogy from corpo- 
rate America too far. But if an organization can 
become so fanatical about a french fry and a slab of 
"beef between a bun, shouldn't we be just as zealous 
over what goes on in our churches? 

The reputation of our God is on the line. We are 
the only outlets who exclusively represent Him. To do 
less than an excellent job in the quality of our services, 
the maintenance of our properties, and the care and 
concern of our people is morally reprehensible. 

It is a New Year. Why don't we all, laymen, 
pastors, missionaries, Sunday school teachers, nurs- 
ery workers, ask ourselves one question, "How can 
we do it better?" Let's take a deep breath, identify 
the points that need our attention, make the improve- 
ments that we need to make, and entrust the results 
to the God who makes all things new. May God 
ignite in us all a new passion for excellence because 
quality produces quantity. 




January 15, 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Brethren Missionary 



cHEIQLD 



Volume 56 No. 1 




January 15, 1994 



2 National Conference 
FOCUS Retreat 

3 Editorial 
Pursuing Excellence 

5 Foreign Missions 
Teaming Up for Vision in 
Latin America 

6 Church Focus 

A Story of a Journey 

7 Faithful Men 

Serving the Lord Together 

8 Women's Missionary Council 
Thank You, WMC 

9 CE National 
Dear Reader 

10 The Great Uncertainty of 
Tomorrow 

1 2 Rush Limbaugh Discusses 
His Christian Faith 

1 4 The Inside Story 

1 6 Clinton Seeks Spiritual A dvice 
From Authors 



17 Fellowship News 

1 8 Highlights from the Newsline 

Would you have an opinion on anything you would like to share with 

the other readers of this magazine? If so, write to Brethren Missionary 

Herald Magazine, P.O. Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

(100 words or less). 





Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Ed Lewis 
Foreign Missions 

Tom Jul i en 

Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 

Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 

Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 

Nora Macon 

Herald News Service: 
1-800-32-32-BMH 
(including Indiana) 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is a publication of the 
Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches, published 
monthly by the Brethren Missionary Herald Co., P.O. 
Box 544, 1 104 Kings Highway, Winona Lake, IN 46590. 
Telephone (219) 267-7158. 

FAX Number: 219-267-4745 

Individual Subscription Rates: 
$13.50 per year 
$25.00 for two years 
$40.00 foreign 

Extra Copies of Back Issues: 
$2.00 single copy 
$1.75 each — 2-10 copies 
$1.50 each — 11 or more copies 

Please include payment with order. Prices include 
postage. For all merchandise orders phone toll free: 
1-800-348-2756. All states and Puerto Rico. 

News items contained in each issue are presented 
for information and do not indicate endorsement. 

Moving? Send label on back cover with new 
address. Please allow four weeks for the change to be- 
come effective. 



Herald Magazine Policy 
News and Advertising Policy 

The Herald magazine offers space for promotional mate- 
rial to the boards, churches and members of the NFGBC. 
This includes publicizing special events, seminars, pro- 
grams or advertising for an organization. Items that are 
news oriented will be printed at no charge. Beginning 
with the April 1992 issue, to distinguish between paid 
advertising and free news material, all purchased ad space 
will specify in small type at the bottom of the ad, who paid 
for the advertisement. 

Standard rates for advertising: 

one full page $370.00 

one half page $225.00 

one quarter page $ 1 26.00 

classified ad 12(! per word 

Color covers are additional. 

For publication schedules contact Publisher, Jeff Carroll 
or Managing Editor, Dolores Gunn. 
1-800-348-2756. 8-5, EST. 

HERALD 



FOREIGN MISSIONS 



Teaming Up for Vision in 
Latin America 



"God is calling me and one of my leaders to go to 
Cuba," announced a Mexican pastor at the second Con- 
ference of the Equipo International in Mexico City this 
past October. This pastor's strong, personal conviction 
is an outgrowth of the expanding vision of the Latin 
American Grace Brethren Churches. Equipo Interna- 
tional means International Team. And it is in the context 
of this teamwork that the Latin American churches are 
becoming enthusiastic about how God could use them to 
actively evangelize their part of the world for Christ. 




A small group discussion of the Equipo Internacional 

A desire for greater relationship and teamwork be- 
tween national church leaders and missionaries motivated 
the creation of the Equipo Internacional in 1992. After the 
first conference that year, Brethren leaders from Mexico, 
Guatemala, and the U.S. became excited about the prospect 
of pooling their resources, personnel, and training for the 
purpose of multiplying Grace Brethren churches in Mex- 
ico, Central America, and the Caribbean. A mission field 
was heeding its call to evangelism. In 1993 the Equipo 
Internacional targeted its first mission field . . . Cuba. 

In early October of last year, missionary Martin 
Guerena and Mexican leader Edgar Couttolenc em- 
barked on a four day trip to Cuba. Their goal was to 
explore the possibilities of planting the first Grace 
Brethren Church in that land. 

"God used us in ways we never imagined," reported 
Martin. "Ten Cuban people trusted Christ in response 
to our preaching and singing in an evangelical Cuban 
church and through door-to-door evangelism. Our 
hearts were broken by the desperate economic plight of 
the Cuban people. Yet our hearts practically burst with 
joy and wonder at how the Cuban Christians are grow- 
ing and boldly sharing their faith in the face of censor- 
ship, discrimination and even persecution. We found 
the door for the Gospel in Cuba wide open to Mexican 
and Guatemalan nationals." Before they left, Martin 




A planning session with Martin Guerena 
and Edgar set up plans for the beginning of a Grace 
Brethren Church in Cuba. A dynamic Cuban pastor, 
who has already started four churches, is eager for the 
Equipo International to send people to Cuba in order to 
help reach his country for Jesus. 

At the second Conference of the Equipo Internacional, 
October 7-10, Martin reported on all that God had done 
through them in Cuba. Forty-five Latin American church 
leaders were deeply challenged by the opportunities which 
God was providing. Two Mexican nationals committed 
themselves to be the first to go. Tom Mien, Executive 
Director of GBFM, Terry Hofecker, Pastor of the Dublin, 
Ohio, GBC and Mexico Field Superintendent, and Jack 
Churchill, Mexico Field Coordinator were on hand at the 
conference to encourage, teach, and motivate participants. 




Kristy Guerena visits with participants 

As a result of teamwork and unity, the Brethren 
churches of Mexico and Guatemala have gained a clear 
picture of the important role God has for them to play 
in the Great Commission. The vision of the Equipo 
Internacional is "to see more and better disciples of 
Christ made throughout Mexico, Central America and 
the Caribbean Islands through evangelism and the plant- 
ing of new Grace Brethren Churches." By actively 
claiming ownership in God's plan, these churches are 
seeing possibilities become realities. 



January 15, 1994 



CHURCH FOCUS 



A Story of a Journey 

by Brian C. Smith 
Grace Community Church, Riverside, California 



Southern California is the home of Palm Springs, 
Hollywood stars, fame, glamour, power, wealth, 
prestige, materialism, two-hour freeway com- 
mutes, smog, stress, violence, drive-by shootings, gang 
warfare, cults, and mega-churches. 

In the midst of it all, a church was born fourteen years 
ago — without an experienced pastor, without a building 
(or even a place to meet), without a seasoned core 
group,without a support staff, without money, without 
land in one of the highest priced real estate markets in the 
world, and in a city where zoning laws oppose the con- 
struction of new churches. 

Ours is a story of a journey — a very long journey. A 
journey much like many have taken before us in different 




Grace Community Church, Riverside, California 

places and different times. In the midst of overwhelming 
odds and obstacles, God reached out, and in His great love 
for people, planted a Bible-teaching Grace Brethren 
Church in Riverside, California. We began with abso- 
lutely nothing, and yet today, because of God's grace, 
enjoy the blessings of a church family of 600, and a 
multi-million dollar facility. 

For most of that journey we enjoyed none of those 
measurable blessings. Yet there were countless blessings 
we did experience, few planned, many unwanted. They 
were blessings nonetheless. On December 5, 1993, we 
celebrated our first anniversary in our own facility which 
we have already outgrown. Later that week I reflected on 
the journey that led us to this point in our ministry. 

When the church began my own son and daughter 
were quite young, five and three years of age. During the 
time our church was growing up, my children were also 
growing up. The growth process in my children's lives 
and in the life of Grace Community Church has many 
similarities. 

Each phase of growth provided challenges. When 
children are young their world and interests are limited, 



and often so are the resources of their parents. As a church, 
in the early years, our ministries and resources were also 
limited, so we focused on the spiritual maturity and growth 
of our small band of believers. Over the passing of years 
we became able to reach beyond the limited horizons of 
our initial beginning. This summer we took the movie 
Jesus to sixteen different neighborhoods (drive-in movie 
style), and were amazed at the response of families who 
came to watch the story of our Savior. Though our re- 
sources and ministries have improved vastly over our 
meager beginnings, our passion to Take Jesus Christ To 
Lost People, And Lost People To Jesus Christ has not 
diminished. 

In the infant stage of Grace Community, our average 
adult age was in the low twenties. Now, still with many 
young families (93% of our church are younger than their 
Pastor), we have middle-aged singles and families, and 
retired grandparents and great-grandparents. 

Some things haven't changed. We have tried to main- 
tain our warm and "small-church" style atmosphere. On 
Sunday mornings, greeters stand at three of our entrances 
to welcome those who come. Further inside we have other 
greeters to welcome anyone missed entering the church. 
On Mondays, first-time visitors find on their front porch 
"Famous Amos" cookies attractively wrapped in a Wel- 
come Basket. 

The priority of my ministry is the faithful teaching of the 
Bible. That hasn't changed since my first study began with just 
five men. And that is still the reason why people initially come, 
and then come back, to Grace Community Church. 

Our church is now fourteen years old, and my two 
children are now seventeen and nineteen. All three "chil- 
dren" have taught me invaluable lessons about myself, and 
about God's magnificent grace. I am blessed in the knowl- 
edge that my time could not have been spent in more 
worthy endeavors. 




jason, Pastor Brian, Kathleen and Kari Smith 



HERALD 



FAITHFUL MEN IN THE CHURCH 



Serving the Lord 
Together 



The Lord guided Vernon Harris and Glyn- 
dowyn Hage together quite uniquely. In 
November 1940 when Vernon's college 
friend Lamar Price begged the reluctant 
Vernon for a ride to see his fiance, Lamar made him 
a promise. He would introduce Vernon to his fi- 
ance's roommate, Glyndowyn Hage. 

Vernon, a Washington state native, was a Bible 
and music student at Moody Bible Institute in Chi- 
cago. Glyndowyn was a Christian education student 
at Wheaton College. Thanks to Vernon's cupid play- 
ing friend, Miss Hage would eventually become Mrs. 
Vernon Harris. 




Vernon and Glyndowyn Harris on their 
wedding day, August 26, 1943 

They were married in Muskegon, Michigan 
shortly after her graduation (she was in the same 
graduating class as Billy Graham). Dr. Glenn 
O'Neal, a boyhood friend of Vernon's performed the 
ceremony. 

They celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniver- 
sary with a variety of activities, including "Harris 
Sunday," August 20, at Grace Brethren Church in 
New Holland, Pennsylvania, where he is associate 
pastor. 

Vernon, a graduate of Moody Bible Institute and 
Wheaton College where he enrolled in 1941 to study 
history, started his ministerial career in 1947, after 
completing his studies at Grace Theological Semi- 
nary. For the next 42 years he served churches in 
Ohio, Oregon, Virginia and Pennsylvania. Mrs. Har- 
ris taught or was a principal in public and Christian 
elementary schools for 25 years. 

After four years in Philadelphia Vernon and 
Glyndowyn moved to Lancaster, Pennsylvania 



where he became pastor of the Lancaster Grace 
Brethren Church. In 1976 he helped start a new 
Grace Brethren Church in Lancaster, where he served 
for 13 years before retiring in March 1989. 

Rev. Vernon Harris is now an associate to Dr. 
Roy Roberts at New Holland Grace Brethren Church. 
Mrs. Harris is the coordinator for the WMC and 
serves on the Christian Education board. 

They have six children, all of whom have been 
involved in Christian service. Roy is a missionary 
pilot with Wycliffe Bible Translators. He and his 
wife Kathy live in Waxhaw, North Carolina. Rudy, 
married to Pamela, live in Longview, Texas. Ronald, 
married to Priscilla, of Fort Worth, Texas, are engi- 
neers. Ramah Lee, a teacher, is the wife of Chester 
Stewart residing in Lancaster, California. Ruth, a 
former teacher is married to Rev. Stephen Blake and 
lives in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Randy, the young- 
est, attended Moody Bible Institute and is a postal 
worker in Chicago, where he lives with his wife 
Debbie. The Harrises have 19 grandchildren. 

Boating and traveling are things that Vernon and 
Glyndowyn like to do in their spare time. They have 
visited all 48 continental United States, as well as 




Vernon and Glyndowyn Harris today 

Mexico, and ten Canadian provinces. He likes mo- 
torcycling, having recently ridden to North Carolina 
to see a son. Glyndowyn enjoys reading and crochet- 
ing — and riding on her husband's motorcycle. 

When asked the secret to their long, happy mar- 
riage, Vernon said it would be marrying the Lord's 
choice. He said, "It was the unmistakable hand of the 
Lord that brought us together and it's worked out our 
whole lifetime together." 



January 15, 1994 



WOMENS MISSIONARY COUNCIL 




Thank 


Yi 


du, WMC 

It at a leal fileawne fan «<t to- addneaa, tAia, Uttet to tfoct 




q)ea/i QiUlC Indies, 




to indicate ocm Aiicene tAatUba far ifoun- faKOKdal aid to 




©n beda(?{ o{ the Qerwany {telld, 5 wouM ftfce to 
ej^pAess ouA thanfes to the JKationad QAi^jUC {oft 




tAe IKedical IVotA o£ tAe tytace 'SnetAnen &AcncAe&- in 
tAe (2-eMtnal ?4faicaK 'RefucAtic. 




anotder generous gi{t toward projects in Qeftmany. 




Oan. joy at yieat ieeattae you 6*ve Aelfied t&e- nudieal 




Saed one o{ us appreciates tde suppo/it o{ our sis- 




cwvi/b. in iti iituatiOK o£ fittnuteiat atilia-. Ik e^cet, t&c 




ters in Cdrist in tde States tdrougdout our years 




medical uuvtSb. a a cAanitaite viqaHtyitiOK, ok utatiittr 




on tde {ie(?d. 9°de ladies o{ tde QALWC daue 




Uok iif ctfAccA- a efood Ktunien- o£ people 6ave ieeK ewutr ), 




demonstrated tdemsefoes to be consistently mission- 




yeli$ed, yivett t6at tAe oS-jectitte- o£ tAe- tKedical utonA it- 




ary-minded and suppofttiue o{ tde wohk o{ tde 




to utiK 4oud to tAe- Jlond, to cane £o% tAe- total fcendott. P. 




Slco/id td/tougdout tde u/o/iM 




(3<U4*2). 




&n 9Jis Q/iace, 




"We one tt&uf t&atfyul to tfotc. and we a&6 tAe £ond to 




CDai/id QAi. oAianduiaa 




6lei& tfou, a6uKda«ttif.. "TVe aaA cfon to continue to fmatf- 






'dfiePd 'cTreasurer 




£ot tAe utedical uwt& tAat it will 6aoe tAe fio&4i6ilitu to 
canruf ok itt cvoitii- £or tAe- ylotu o£ oun- j^ond (leiua, (^AnM. \ 










0neetiK$& i*i tAe wondeit^ul iu**ne o£ oetn. 
^<yid eutd SaxUot fe&ua. (^Aniat! 

y jtwt UKittted to <nuf a- wottd o£ tAaM/ba, to 
yowl tAoctyAtfrtl yife tAlz toot cfecvi to oun li£- 




Ik doling, we aiAune ifocc tAat <fatci $i(t will 6e admitc- 
Atexed to tAe fvtofrt o£ tAe iieA.. 

"ZOitA ventf- Ai$A coK&idetatiOK, 
tyaatoK laiio 
")Hedieal "20ox& "Dinectox 






tteie arte ett-jotfitty- tAe- matexiala, tAat Aave. 




7 




6eett, fuoicAa&ed tAia fcvi. /4$ttf* tAtudb ifou, 
<io- ihucA fan. cfoun ueatlu $ifa-. 




5t is my pMuifege to wtite you at this time in acknowledgement of youJi 
gijt to the seminary, biofogy department in the coMcge, and seminary li- 




(Zedl 0"Dell 




brary boofc fund. >JM. three of these areas aAe in g/teat need oj Junding, 




fizfiati 'pCelei SufienuttendetU 




and it is both thoughtful! and g/iacious of you to assist these ministries at 
this time. 

■^We oka gftatejud to ou* Sfoftd fo/i the continued faithjufness of the t_Ala- 
tiona? ^Mtluen ^oWC and the impact you hai/e had oueJi the years. 












CDeaft CUUAC ladies, 






"ETdanfe you uery mucd {oft your most generous gift representing 
designated project offerings {oft cAlaeajo ^Ministries and Q12c4 




£ucn though the chafficnge for softd Cliristian higher education are sub- 
stantiee and euen ominous at times, we face the future with great confi- 




edureh-pPanting. 

9°de (ladies of tde C W<MC are to be appfaudcd for their faitd- 
{u&iess, {oft tdeift consistent and cheerful! support of missionary en- 




tit mi because of partnws ftfce yourself. v 

QAie haue been most pteased with the way the SPord has worbed in the 
frees of students through different aecnucs this year, 'tlhis testimony in 




terprise. '-Praying and giving are not easy tasfcs, giuen tde pres- 
su/tes in today's society; especially tde pjtessu/tes on womanhood. 

cfrom out entire staff of dard-worfcing missionaries, pfease 
accept ou/t deartfe.Ct tdanfcs. 

^UAtd praise and auction, 

S£arrij lAI. Chamberlain, fixeoutuie 'Director 




the community continues to haue a uery positive impact, and their ministry 
to others throughout the region is a source for reaf rejoicing. j 
^UJith warm persona? regards, 
>l>n J). q)avis 
"-President > 




Qrace Qretliren *3ionie ^Uissions 















HERALD 



CE NATIONAL 




Dear Reader, 



'e are excited to 
introduce a new 
^j-Y^I ▼ T feature of the 

iTlO'^ Herald — an idea page to 

assist local churches in their 
Christian Education ministries. This page, developed by 
CE National, is a result of our cooperative desire to help 
local church ministries. We hope that this addition to the 
Herald will be of benefit to you and your church. If you 
have any successful Sunday School, ABF or small group 
ideas, please send them to CE National, P.O. Box 365, 
Winona Lake, IN 46590, to be used in upcoming issues 
of the Herald. 

The 20 key elements of an ABF are: 

1 . Between 20 and 40 people attending, with 20% 
of the class having attended less than a year. 

2. A carefully selected class leader who shepherds the class. 

3. Care deacons (1 for every 10 people or family units) for 
care, calling, accountability and love. 

4. At least 6 socials annually with one targeting 
ministry/evangelism. 

5. A class project. 

6. Coffee, juice or refreshments available. 

7. Discussion-centered interaction (perhaps using the Seren- 
dipity Study Bible). 

8. A discipleship-format where the leader teaches to change lives, 
not just to give lessons. The format should include: 

a. Asking how people are doing; 

b. Prayer; 

c. Interviews or testimonies of changed lives; 

d. The freedom to share; and 

e. An assignment and challenge for the following week. 

9. A regular meeting place. 

10. Between 60 and 75 minutes of class time. 

1 1 . A periodic flyer for class members which introduces class 
members, emphasizes prayer requests/answers, gives re- 
sources to read which coincide with the Bible study, etc. 

12. A warm, friendly, fun beginning to the weekly class time. 

13. A short curriculum series (2-3 months maximum). 

14. A mailing list with 10 potential future "members" on it. 

15. A directory of all class members' names, addresses, and 
phone numbers. 

16. Punctuality, starting and ending on time, while 
still providing a time for caring and relationships. 

17. Teaching which requires use of the Bible each week and 
"digging" into it. 

18. Regular prayer and a weekly prayer list. 

19. An annual goal, supported by the class, aimed at benefiting 
the entire church. 

20. A regular emphasis to promote weekly small group 
Bible studies for outreach, growth or meeting needs. 

• Teacher training— Consider a teacher training day for all 
your teachers and workers. Work with three or four other 
teachers to get ideas and encouragement. 



• Think-tanking— Have a regional round-table discussion 
involving several churches' children's workers. Consider 
one for youth or adults, too! 

• Youth worker training— Sonlife is a great program for 
training youth workers and is available in various locations 
across the country for workers with varying levels of 
experience. This training will also be provided for adults 
at BNYC '94 in a program known as Blueprints. 

• Curriculum— Scripture Press is the Sunday School curricu- 
lum most used throughout the Grace Brethren Fellowship. 
David C. Cook and Gospel Light follow closely behind with 
use of any one of the three being a sound choice. 

• Recruiting— When recruiting Christian Education work- 
ers, be sure you're asking them to make a spiritual deci- 
sion. Emphasize the group's potential and how God could 
use them. 

• Pre-schoolers— Preschool children often establish their 
concept of God from what is provided at Sunday School 
and church. Be sure to teach children, not merely provide 
child care. 

• Children's church— The children's church hour can be 
like a "Children's Rally" each Sunday morning where kids 
can be motivated and challenged. This hour should relate 
to both non-churched and "Christian school" children. The 
Sunday School hour is the time where one class can be 
provided for the spiritually-trained child and another class 
for the non-churched. Consider a creative name for your 
Children's Rally, such as Kid's Kingdom or Friendship Club. 

• Videos— If concerned about all the videos on the market, 
consider subscribing to the magazine, "MOVIEGUIDE," that 
rates films from a biblical worldview. (1-800-899-6684). 

• Senior Citizens— Only 5% of Americans over 65 are in 
nursing homes at any one time and only 5% of Americans 
over 65 have Alzheimer's disease or any kind of senility. 
Life expectancy is nearly 80 years for women and over 72 
years for men - this is up from 45 years at the turn of the 
century. This age group provides a great opportunity for 
ministries and involvement. 



Single Statistics: 



• People born in the Baby Boom generation (between 1 946 
and 1964) are 500% more likely than their parents to be 
single. 

• 60% of today's children will live with only one parent for 
some period before they reach age 18. 

• 25% of children in the United States currently live in a 
single parent family. 

• 50% of divorced people remarry within three years. 

• 57% of unchurched adults in the U.S. are single. 

• There are more single men under the age of 40 than single 
women. 

• Only 1/3 of single adults live alone. 

• 50% of first marriages, 60% of second marriages and 75% 
of third marriages end in divorce. 

Question: Has your church considered a ministry to this 
growing number of single adults? 



January 15, 1994 



The Great Uncertainty 
of Tomorrow 



by Pastor Tim Coyle 
Newark, Delaware 



Several years ago I made a 
delightful discovery in 
our town. From 8:00 
P.M. to 11:00 P.M. every Sunday 
evening there is a program on our 
local university radio station that 
plays nothing but big band music. 
The program is called "In a Mist," 
and the announcer's name is, Neal 
Payne. Soon I became a regular 
listener. 

The announcer invited listeners to call and 
make requests or just to share comments about 
the show, and it wasn't long before I started 
calling in. After a while I felt like I knew Neal 
though we had never actually met. When the 
station's annual radiothon came along, I called 
in and said that I had no problem making a 
pledge, seeing how much I listened to the pro- 
gram and how much I enjoyed it. But I told Neal 
that I would also like to do something else to 
show my appreciation for his being there every 
week (the announcers receive no pay). I said 
that I would like to take him out to lunch some- 
time. He responded, "I can let you do that." 

A few weeks later we got together for lunch. 
Neal was not all that old, but he was old enough to 



remember the big bands when they were in their 
hey day, and he was now near retirement. I could 
tell from the radio program that Neal was kind of 
a cantankerous guy, and he proved to be even more 
so in person. But he was also very friendly and 
warm, and we hit it off well. He didn't seem to 
mind that I was a minister, but he made it clear that 
he wasn't too interested in spiritual things. He 
didn't seem to mind asking me on occasion to pray 
for him, though. 

As it turned out, one of our deacons lived just 
down the street from Neal, and I made sure Neal 
and Ron met. It seemed like God might be weav- 
ing a net of believers around Neal. 

I don't know how many times after that we 
had lunch together, but we always had a good time. 
And, of course, we kept in regular contact when he 
was on the air on Sunday evenings. I continued to 
pray for Neal, probably more often than he knew 
or ever intended for me to. I sensed that he might 
have some underlying needs, but he wasn't ready 
to let them surface. He also knew that he was 
always welcome to come to our church, but he 
didn't have much interest in doing that either. The 
reason he offered was that he met regularly with 
an old friend for breakfast on Sunday mornings. 

Then, just recently our church participated in 
an annual local event called Community Day, just 
as we have done every year for the past few years. 
This time we decided to follow up our participa- 
tion in Community Day with an open house at our 
church the following Sunday morning. 

The Friday before the open house, I needed 
to drop off some things at Ron's for the follow- 
ing Sunday. As I left, I told Ron that I was going 
to stop by Neal's and invite him to come to the 
open house. I did stop, but no one was home. I 
remember saying to myself as I left, "We'll get 
him next time." 



10 



HERALD 



We had the open house and it went well. 
After lunch with some people from church, we 
spent the rest of the afternoon relaxing at home. 
Then the phone rang. It was Ron. He said, 
"Pastor, I've got some bad news. A neighbor 
just stopped by and told me that Neal was killed 
in an automobile accident this morning." Ron 
also mentioned that Neal's daughter had been 
married just the day before. 

A thousand thoughts flooded through my 
mind. I wished I would have followed up the 
visit to Neal's with a phone call. Maybe he 
would have come. I also remembered a tongue- 
in-cheek piece that I had read recently. It men- 
tioned such things as how many accidents occur 
in the home and on the road, and made the point 
that the safest place to be on a Sunday morning 
was in church. Suddenly that piece had a 
strange air of reality to it. Then I thought of how 
costly this particular Sunday breakfast turned 
out to be. I thought about the contrast between 
the joy of a wedding one day, and the tragedy of 
an accidental death the next, and how the family 
must feel. I thought about how hard Neal had 
worked as a bricklayer, and now as his retire- 
ment approached, this should happen. 

But what struck me the most was something 
that is found in the book of James. In verses 
4:13-14, it says, "Come now, you who say, 'Today 
or tomorrow . . .' Yet you do not know what your 
life will be like tomorrow. You are just a vapor 
that appears for a little while and then vanishes 
away." I thought about the vapor that rises from 
the tea kettle. Or the wisps of fog that sometime 
form at night, only to be burned off by the morning 
sun. And now Neal's earthly life was no more than 
these had once been. Our lives are just like the 
mist in the name of Neal's program. James was 
right, and I was wrong to think so casually that I 



would reach my friend the next time. With Neal 
there wouldn't be a next time. 

This sudden loss also reminded me of the 
seriousness of what we are all involved in. There 
is nothing more important than sharing the gospel 
of Jesus Christ with those who need to hear it. At 
times we almost feel apologetic for wanting to tell 
people about what Jesus did for them, and how 
they can know that they have eternal life. Yes, 
sometimes people do resent our supposed audacity 
in sharing that there might be something they need 
to know and to act upon in order to gain eternal 
life. But if they only knew how short their life 
might be, they would be beating down our doors 
to hear the message of the gospel. 

I'll miss hearing him on Sunday evenings. 
Someone may continue playing the same music, 
but no one will ever be able to do the program as 
well as he did it. I'll miss our friendship. He 
added a lot to the community, and he made a good 
friend. But I fear that maybe we need to become 
a bit more bold. We may end up driving a few 
people away, but perhaps we might drive a lot 
more to Christ. 

Yes, we are all so busy. But maybe we need 
to concentrate on just a few instead of trying to 
reach everyone we have contact with at the same 
time. Maybe instead of having scores of shallow 
relationships, we need to concentrate on building 
a few quality ones. And above all, we need to pray 
for those we know. Maybe then we will have a 
wisdom beyond our own regarding what to say and 
when. And maybe then we will see a softening of 
the heart that we know comes only from God. 

I know a chiropractor whose motto is, 
"Changing the world, one spine at a time." 
Maybe we need to get back to thinking of chang- 
ing the world one soul at a time. And we need 
to work at it. 



LIFE CHANGING STORIES 



When a Hindu woman became a follower of Christ, her unsaved relatives tried to make 
her life miserable. One day a missionary asked her, "When your husband is angry and 
persecutes you, what do you do? She replied, "I just cook the food a little better and 
sweep the floor a little cleaner. When he speaks unkindly, I answer him mildly, trying 
to show him in every way that when I became a Christian I also became a better wife. 

That husband resisted all the sermons of the missionary, but he could not withstand the practical 
preaching of his wife. The Holy Spirit used that woman's gracious testimony, and eventually the man 
received Christ. 



January 15, 1994 



11 



Rush Limbaugh Discusses 
His Christian Faith 



Editor's Note: According to Publishers 
Weekly, Rush Limbaugh's The Way Things Ought 
to Be is the fastest selling book in history, amass- 
ing unit sales of 2.4 million in just over a year. 
Christian bookstores rang up a fair number of 
those sales. Limbaugh's book earned a spot on 
Bookstore Journal's best-seller list for 4 months, 
peaking at No. 12 in February of this year. 

Limbaugh's latest book, See, I Told You So, 
was released early November and is being distrib- 
uted to the Christian Bookseller's Association 
market (in cloth and audio book format). 

Because Limbaugh has a presence in our in- 
dustry, we thought you would be interested in his 
perspective on politics, society, and faith in God. 
The radio host, whose show reaches approxi- 
mately 20 million listeners daily, talks about these 
subjects and more in the following interview, 
which was excerpted from the November/Decem- 
ber issue of The Door. 

Mike Atkinson, director of periodicals for 
Youth Specialties (The Door's publisher), reports 
that Spring Arbor 
Distributors has in- 
creased its Door order 
from 400 to 4,000 
because of the 
Limbaugh in- 
terview. 




Door: Most adults seem to have lost their bear- 
ings. They are too busy; they have no real friend- 
ships; they're boring; they're predictable, they're 
shallow. They seem to have abandoned their 
souls. Do you think that's fairly accurate? 

Limbaugh: There isn't any question that some 
folks have "lost their bearings," as you put it, but 
it's risky to suggest that a majority of any [group] 
is doing anything good or bad. In the case of 
spirituality, what's happening is that it's a certain 
segment of the '60s generation — epitomized by 
Hillary and Bill Clinton and the people they have 
chosen to surround themselves with — who are 
talking about the "politics of meaning" — and the 
need for spirituality in politics. 

People have spirituality in their lives now. 
It's called religion. These people [the '60s genera- 
tion] don't like the religion that's out there now; 
they don't like Christianity or any of the others. 
They want to create their own religion because 
they're so arrogant. 

Door: Is it just the Clinton administration who 
have lost touch with their souls? 

Limbaugh: No, of course not. Obviously, 
there are more than just [those in] the Clinton 
administration who have lost their souls, but I am 
convinced that a significant percentage of the peo- 
ple in the '60s generation are, for the most part, 
without their souls. 

Door: You talk about God periodically on your 
radio program, and when you do, it sounds as if 
you have a personal faith. Is that true? 

Limbaugh: Yes. 

Door. Where did it come from? 

Limbaugh: My family and the Methodist church 
where we grew up. Specifically, it was my father. 
My father was deeply religious. He did not parade it 
around in front of everyone. He lived it. He 
wouldn't have fit into the categories that have been 
created today to describe religious people. He was a 
scholar of the Bible-he had read it many times. 

Door: If your faith means so much to you, why 
don 'tyou talk about it more on your program? 

Limbaugh: I do not discuss the personal side 
of my belief; because my radio show is not the 



HERALD 



place for that. I don't look to the radio as a pulpit. 
I don't look at what I do as a sermon. I don't want 
to argue people's faith with them, don't want to 
get into arguments about the Bible. 

Door: Isn 't your position in conflict with the notion 
that believers are supposed to spread the Word? 

Limbaugh: I just think my radio program is 
the wrong place for it. Frankly, no one would 
listen to it. Besides that, I don't like to take calls 
from people who want to tell me why we shouldn't 
raise taxes because of what the Bible says in 
Ezekiel. I don't want to talk to people who form 
every belief they have on a biblical passage. I 
don't want to be offensive with that, but I have to 
keep in perspective what I do. 

Door: Power, fame, and money are not neutral. 
They change people. You are all three of those 
right now. Have they changed you? 

Limbaugh: I have to go back to my family and 
the values I was raised with. Add to that a healthy 
dose of insecurity, and I manage to keep my feet 
somewhat on the ground. 

I am also very fortunate because, as I have 
become more successful, there have been disbeliev- 
ers and critics with me all along the way, telling me 
and everyone else, "This won't last. This guy is a 
flash in the pan.... This guy is wrong. This guy is 
mean. This guy is a Nazi. This guy is an antichrist. 
This guy is homophobic, a sexist, and a bigot." 

That creates in me a need to prove myself 
every day-not in response to critics, but to those 
things about me that are not true. [My] audience 
has grown to astronomical proportions, and they 
have done it because of me. This show is me, and 
people listen or watch because of me. Therefore, 
they have expectations, and therefore, I feel the 
implicit responsibility to satisfy and meet their 
expectations every day, and that's what drives me. 
Door: [What do you think of] the religious right? 

Limbaugh: Misnamed. The "religious right" 
has corne to mean something's wrong with those 
people because they are right-wing. The religious 
right are just decent Christians who believe that this 
country was founded on the basis that the religious 
could be involved in government. They are simply 
resisting the notion that religion is a disqualifier for 
serving in government. They are solid, they're un- 
wavering, and they hold to their principles. They 
have been unfairly categorized as the unwavering 
pro-life people. Not all of the religious right are the 
pro-lifers who are irritating to some. But that's OK. 
That's been the history of the faithful and devout- 
they have always been castigated. 

People are afraid of those who are secure and 

Reprinted by permission 



confident in their faith. People don't like having 
a finger pointed in their faces and being told they 
are sinning, that they are wrong. So some fallout 
does occur from the persuasion technique that 
some use. The religious right is one of the most 
maligned groups in the country. 

Door: Oddly, we've heard a number of the relig- 
ious right criticize you. 

Limbaugh: Some of my most vicious hate 
mail is from people who identify themselves as 
Christians. If I [swear], I get letters saying my soul 
is going to burn in hell ... I must be honest with 
you. There is a lot of intolerance among certain 
people of all religions. 

There are people who are disappointed that I am 
not as devoted as they would like me to be. They are 
disappointed that I don't use my program to promote 
whatever they think the Christian agenda is. 

Door: You talk on your program about people \s 
unhappiness with the government, with Clinton, 
etc. Why are people so unhappy in this country? 
What does make a person happy? Where do we 
need to go to find what gives life meaning? 

Limbaugh: Jesus. Jesus holds the answers to 
all of the everyday problems that you face. I am 
talking about an acceptance and belief in Jesus, 
heaven, and God. I guess you can deal with your 
problems on your own without those beliefs, but 
it's much, much tougher. With those beliefs, you 
realize how insignificant the budget deficit debate 
is in comparison with the big picture. 

The quest for happiness is too often centered on 
materialism and wealth. Anyone who has had those 
things will tell you that they don't contribute to 
internal happiness or self-satisfaction at all. The 
comfort of a firm belief is probably the single greatest 
gift you could give somebody who's really seeking 
self-satisfaction and internal happiness. Happiness 
is an illusive thing, but the contentment and peace- 
fulness are the real focus. 

I have become really good friends with Paul 
Westphal, coach of the Phoenix Suns. You ought 
to get a video tape of any game in the playoffs 
between the Suns and Chicago Bulls. You will not 
find a more stressful position than head coach in a 
championship professional basketball game . . . 
Compare any coach to Paul Westphal. Westphal 
looks as peaceful sitting on the sidelines in the 
middle of a basketball game as he does when you 
are at home with him and his family. 

That is a sure, sure sign that he is a believer in 
God, and I happen to know that he is. He is pro- 
foundly religious. Paul is an example of the content- 
ment and peacefulness that belief gives you. 
of The Door. Printed in Bookstore Journal, December 1993. 



January 15, 1994 



13 



THE INSIDE STORY 



The Inside 



by Joanne E. DeJonge 



Joanne E. DeJonge is a free-lance 

writer and author of several books 

for children. She works as 

a seasonal interpretative 

ranger for the National 

Park Service at 

Sleeping Bear 

Dunes National 

Lakeshore in 

Michigan 




When we take time to look over an ani- 
mal to see how well it's created for its 
life, we usually examine the outside: 
good legs, neat neck, eyes in the right place-that 
sort of thing. Rarely do we go beyond that. This 
time we'll skip the outside and go straight inside. 
We'll poke around inside a giraffe. 

Looking at the outside of a giraffe, you 
know there has to be something pretty special 
going on inside. For example, that long neck 
may be perfect for plucking leaves from the tops 
of trees, but how in the world does it regulate 
blood flow? And how can it be stiff and sturdy, 
yet flexible enough to turn? 

Those six-foot legs on the giraffe's short body 
could be troublesome too. How does the giraffe 
keep them from kicking each other? How does it 
get them to kick at all? What's the inside story? 

Starting at the Top. Think first for a minute 
about the problems a giraffe might have stuffing 
food into its mouth. It likes to eat tender shoots 
from trees, especially acacia trees, which may have 
thorns. Talk about a thorny problem! The giraffe's 
tongue solves that one. 

Its tongue is tough — much tougher than ours. 
Thorns don't bother it, so a mouthful of thorns is 
quite OK. 

That tongue is also much more limber than 
ours. It's designed to wrap itself around shoots 
and pull them off the trees. Besides that, it's about 
eighteen inches long. So the giraffe can get a good 
grip on its food, pull it, and stuff it into its mouth- 
all with its handy tongue. 

Now think about that long neck, with blood 
pumping up and running down inside. Several prob- 
lems are solved with special valves and muscles. 

Numerous one-way valves line the enormous 
veins in a giraffe's neck to prevent blood back-up. 
So when a giraffe lowers its head for a drink of 
water, all the blood in its neck doesn't rush down 
to its head. The one-way valves prevent that from 



14 



HERALD 



THE INSIDE STORY 








away from the head but not back to it. Tidbit* got the idea. If you move the stilts from 

When the giraffe is standing straight " the top, it takes little effort for a big step, 
and tall, special muscles in a neck artery UriUSflllv Move them at the bottom, and you might 
keep pumping new blood to its head. as well not have stilts. 
Whether the giraffe's head is up or down, IcITCC Now swing your stilts from the top. 
the artery helps pump the blood in the . You almost have a weapon there. The 
right direction. SlnUSCS, Or giraffe does. Because of the muscle ar- 

A giraffe never has too much blood ■<• • rangement in its legs, one twitch of an 
rush to its head when it takes a drink. »- c « v,l,cs r ** upper muscle can send a six-foot leg 
And it never passes out from lack of piraffp's swinging like a huge baseball bat with a 
blood when it stands up straight. You've O hoof on the end. 

probably never thought of that before. Il6cicl mskc We've covered only the mouth, neck, 
But Someone did. ( and legs, and already we're out of space. 

So what makes a giraffe able to move IIS SKllll But here's one last point you've probably 
its neck in the first place? We know the . never considered about giraffes: a running 
animal has stiff neck bones-what else C|UII6 giraffe has a tail problem. Because the 
could keep the head up straight?-so how i •_|_|.... Q *„U* giraffe is so tall, its tail could easily get 
can the giraffe bend and turn its neck so ■■"5"l»V'Clglll. ca ught in low tree branches. The inner 
easily? It can do so because the joints in w solution? A special muscle. A giraffe can 
its neck are ball-and-socket joints, like we have in curl its tail tightly over its back. That way the tail 
our shoulders. Those joints make the giraffe's doesn't flap against tree branches and shrubs, 
neck flexible as well as sturdy. Wave your arms Pretty neat, inside as well as out. 
abound a bit, and you'll get a feel for how flexible We often say that animals were created by the 
a giraffe's neck is. Master Designer. Maybe we should add Mastei 

Engineer to the title. 

One Foot in Front of the Used by permission The Banner 




Other. Most four-footed animals 
walk by putting their left front foot 
forward at the same time as their 
right back foot. It's a diagonal sort 
of walk that works well to keep the 
animal stable. But think of what 
would happen if the long-legged, 
short-bodied giraffe walked that 
way. Its right back foot, when 
swinging forward, would stumble 
over its right front foot as it swings 
backward. There's not enough 
room between the legs. 

So a giraffe is one of the few 
four-footed animals that puts its 
left back foot forward along with 
its left front foot. Its legs never 
knock against each other. Does 
that make sense to you? It certainly 
does to a giraffe. 

Inside a giraffe's leg you'll 
find lots of heavy muscle at the top 
but hardly any lower down. Strong 
muscles in the upper part of each 
leg help the giraffe move without 
wasting a lot of energy. If those 
muscles were lower down, the leg 
would be too heavy for the giraffe. 


Animals in the Bible 

1 . According to Proverbs, what four creatures "are small, 
yet . . . are extremely wise?" (Prov. 30:24-28? 

2. According to Proverbs, what three creatures "Move with 
stately bearing" (Prov. 30:29-31)? 

3. What animal skins were used to cover the tabernacle in the 
widlerness (Ex. 36:19)? 

4. What unclean animals did the prodigal son feed (Luke 15:15)? 

5. "As the pants for streams of water, so my 
soul pants for you, God" (Ps. 42: 1). 

6. Do you give the his strength or clothe his neck 
with a flowing mane?" (Job 39:19) 

7. "Does the take flight by your wisdom and 




spread his wings toward th south?" (Job 39:26). 
8. "He provides food for the and for the 


young when they call" (Ps. 147:9). 
9. "Praise the Lord from the earth, you great 


and all ocean depths" (Ps. 148:7). 


10. Jesus said, "I am the good . The good 


lays down his life for the 


(John 10:11). 







January 15, 1994 



15 



Clinton Seeks Spiritual Advice 

Authors 



From 




President Clinton re- 
cently met with 12 
evangelical leaders 
— including several well- 
known Christian authors 
to listen to their spiritual 
advice. 

Upset by conserva- 
tive Christians' attacks on 
his social policies-espe- 
cially those from his own 
Southern Baptist denomi- m H y bels 

nation's leadership Clinton had been advised to try 
meeting with more moderate evangelicals, according 
to Fuller Theological Seminary President Richard 
Mouw. Clinton agreed, and a list of invitees was 
assembled by Linda LeSourd Lader, daughter of 
Christian writer Leonard LeSourd, with help from 
Christianity Today Executive Editor David Neff. 

Among those at the White House for the Oct. 18 
breakfast meeting were Mouw; Bill Hybels; Tony Cam- 
polo; Philip Yancey; Jack Hayford; Jay Kesler, presi- 
dent of Taylor University; urban development advocate 
John Perkins; World Vision President Robert Seiple; 
and Roberta Hestenes, president of Eastern College. 

Hybels, who spent the night before the meeting 



at the White House, helped Clinton set the meeting's 
agenda. "They agreed that each of us would answer 
the question, 'What spiritual advice would you give 
the president?'" Mouw told Bookstore Journal. 
"Perkins and Campolo raised issues about how gov- 
ernment agencies have made it difficult for churches 
to work in inner cities. [Clinton] seemed very taken 
with that point." 

Another discussion topic was the need to allow 
more public expression of religion. "I suggested he 
work harder at making specific connections between 
his biblical convictions and his policies," Mouw said. 

Mouw, whose book Uncommon Decency (Inter- 
Varsity Press) admonishes Christians to be models of 
civility when presenting their beliefs to others, char- 
acterized the meeting's overall tone as "very warm 
and pastoral." The president reportedly read Mouw's 
book after the meeting. A Nov. 1 Washington Times 
report speculated that the White House might use the 
gathering to show that Clinton has evangelical sup- 
port, but participants said that was a risk they were 
willing to take. 

"There was a risk every time Billy Graham went 
to the White House," Mouw said in the Times report. 
"We have to act in good faith, even if people say you 

are being used. There is risk in not going." 

Reprinted by permission Book-tore Journal, December 1993. 



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Brethren Missionary 



16 



HERALD 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



Church Celebrates 25th 
Anniversary 

On January 30, 1 994 the Mabton Grace Brethren Church 
will celebrate 25 years in their building. The church began 
from a small group of believers from Grandview Grace 
Brethren Church meeting in Mabton as a Bible class and 
Church formed on January 10, 1967. The dedication of their 
first building was on January 19, 1969. This year in celebra- 
tion of the 25th anniversary of the building John Mcintosh, 
pastor of Simi Valley Grace Brethren Church, will be the 
guest speaker on Sunday, January 30, 1994. 



Wedding 
Anniversary 

On December 27, 1993 Arthur and Anna Hughes 
of Lancaster, Pennsylvania celebrated their 60th wed- 
ding anniversary. For over 40 years they were members 
of Grace Brethren 
Churches. They were con- 
verted at the Uniontown, PA 
Grace Brethren Church. 
They were charter members 
of the York, Pa and the 
Wrightsville, PA churches. 
At the present they are 
members of the Lancaster, 
PA Grace Brethren Church. 



Address Change 

□ John and Sally Ilko 

10802 W. Hillsborough Ave., Apt. 1202 

Tampa, FL 33615 

(Pastor, Town 'n Country GBC) 



□ Tampa Town 'n Country GBC 

all mail to Pastor John Ilko 




Death Notices 



Thelma Artz, charter member of the Mabton, WA 
Grace Brethren Church went home to be with the Lord 
on October 6, 1993. She was survived by her husband, 
Louis Artz. They were instrumental in establishing the 
Mabton Grace Brethren Church in 1967. 

Andean Burtoft went home to be with the Lord on 
November 26, 1993. She was an awesomely faithful 
and blessed member of the Ellet Grace Brethren 
Church, Akron, Ohio. She and her husband have been 
to Navajo missions many times to help. She was also 
involved with the Akron Haven of Rest Missions and 
Mobile Meals to shut ins. She will be greatly missed 
by her husband James, who survives and sons John, 
Warsaw, IN, and James, Washington, PA. The funeral 
was November 30 at the Ellet Church with Steve 
Cisney and John Snow officiating. 

Peter A. Castonquay, age 51, of Island Pont, VT, 
passed away suddenly on October 12, 1993 after suf- 
fering complications of pancreatitis following gall 
bladder surgery. Pete was very active in the ministry 
of the Grace Brethren Church. He worked for the 
Vermont State Highway Department for 23 years, 
served over 20 years with the town fire department and 
nearly ten years on the town's board of selectmen. 
Approximately 300 people completely filled the 
church to overflowing at his memorial service led by 
Pastors Bob Kulp and Dale Jenks. He was a good 
witness for the Lord to his family, friends and commu- 
nity. Peter is survived by his wife Peggy, daughter 
Cathy Hilliker and family of Dover, Delaware and son 
Mark and family of Island Pond. 

Nettie Woodring, 88, went to be with the, Lord on 
December 14, 1993. She was a member of the Hager- 
stown, Maryland Grace Brethren Church for 27 years. 
Ray H. Davis, Pastor 

Harold 0. Quartz, long time, faithful member of the 
Ellet Grace Brethren Church of Akron, Ohio, passed 
away on December 9, 1993, at the age of 91. R. John 
Snow, Pastor. 



January 15, 1994 



17 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



Highlights from the Herald Newsline 



• The Saturation Saturdays evangelistic blitz in Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, ended November 20th. Dave Guiles 
reported the final statistics. Area churches now have 
over 1 00 solid contacts and new believers to follow-up 
on. Thirty-four Bible Institute students worked 29 Sat- 
urdays. 65,000 evangelistic flyers were distributed. 
Nearly 3,000 evangelistic surveys were conducted. 
The Gospel was shared with 1,400 adults. 

Hundreds of children heard the Gospel in Good 
News Clubs. Each participating Brethren Church has 
seen measurable growth. The Jose Marmol Grace 
Brethren Church has doubled in attendance as a result 
of participation in this project. 

• Pastor Lee Seese of the Community GBC, Everett, PA, 

announced an upcoming outreach ministry, A Commu- 
nity Christmas. The church invited less fortunate children 
and their families from the area for an afternoon including 
decorating trees, a pizza and turkey dinner, puppet pro- 
gram, games, and a story about the true meaning of 
Christmas. Each child received a Children's Bible, toys and 
clothing. Families were given a bag of groceries and a 
Christmas tract. Nearly $1,000 has been raised for the 
project in cash, gift certificates and donations from the 
church family, local businesses and high schools. It is the 
church's prayer that this December 19 event will meet 
spiritual as well as physical needs. 

• Pastor True Hunt went into the presence of the Lord 
on December 10. He died of aortic aneurysm in 
emergency surgery. His life story was in the Brethren 
Missionary Herald in October. 

• On December 9-1 1 a summit of denominational lead- 
ers was organized by the movement AD 2000 and 
Beyond at Colorado Springs. This was attended by Bob 




Fetterhoff, Moderator of the Fellowship of Grace Breth- 
ren Churches; Tom Julien, Director of Grace Brethren 
Foreign Missions; Kurt Miller, Director of Church Plant- 
ing for the Home Missions Council; and Ed Trenner, 
Consultant for the National Strategy Committee. This 
movement is seeking to coordinate global efforts to 
reach the world during this final decade of the 20th 
century. Their slogan is "a church for every people and 
the gospel for every person by the year 2000." Special 
attention is given to the peoples of the world who do 
not have access to the gospel, especially to what is 
called the 1 0-40 window of the globe, comprising most 
of the Muslim countries, India and China. 

Pastors, have you discovered how much it means to your 
people when you send a birthday or anniversary card, or 
just a card to tell them you're praying for them? You might 
want to start with Dayspring greeting cards from the 
Herald Bookstore, all at 50% off. Only $2.75 a box! Thaf s 
money well spent. Your people love encouragement. 

Though the temperature lingers around zero degrees 
Farhenheit in Novosibirsk, Russia, Paul Michaels is 

finding hearts warm to the Gospel. Recently Paul 
explained Christianity to 50 parents at a school. The 
administrator was so enthusiastic that he said Paul 
could use the school as he wished. Paul has begun 
saturation evangelism in two areas of Novosibirsk. Two 
men trusted Christ in a recent encounter. 

Make plans now to attend National Conference. Did 
you see the lineup of speakers? There are Knute and 
Jeanne Larson, H. B. London, R. C. Sproul, Jim Custer, 
Dan Allen, Bill Bright, Ed Lewis, to name just a few. 
And the place? Some rooms only $59.50 in Orlando! 
Make your reservations now at 1-800-237-9549, for 
July 23-28, 1994. 




News 
Bearers 



"IF THI5 KEEPS UP. WEIL HAVE TO PUT ON EiCTRA 
HELP JUST TO PROCESS PAUL'S LETTERS." 



From Biblical Cartoons, Dwight Allen, Jr., cartoonist. 
George W. Knight, compiler. Baker Book House, 1993. 



We now receive over 
50,000 phone calls per year 
at the Brethren Mission- 
ary Herald Company on 
the 800 number (1-800- 
32-32-BMH). This costs over $12,000 per year. Your 
contribution of any amount will help defray costs for 
this service. One hundred percent of your gift will go 
toward maintenance costs. Your name will be listed in 
the Herald magazine after we receive your contribu- 
tion. Send your contribution to Brethren Missionary 
Herald, P.O. Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590. 



18 



HERALD 



The Brethren Adult series for 
March, April and May 

features Faith that Works 




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James has a concise 
commentary on each verse. 
Discussion questions after 
each of the thirteen lessons 
further enhance its usefulness 
for group study. 



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multiple copies— actual shipping costs) 



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taught the Epistle of James to 
seminarians and preached on it at Bible 
conferences and in churches. 



i*~ Free "*i 



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by Warren Wiersbe! 

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Vi 




9 //^ }I .... U9 ^^ 



Although I'm 76 years old, God has been 

gracious, and I still enjoy the privilege of 

taking people to visit the land of the Savior. 



Wouldn't you like to join me on one 
of the following trips? 

May 21-June 1 ISRAEL with an 
overnight in Istanbul. 

May 31 -June 12 TURKEY 

including the Seven Churches of Asia, 
Troy, Cappadocia and Istanbul. 

October 3-14 (17) ISRAEL and 
ATHENS with an optional GREEK 
ISLAND CRUISE. 



In addition to traveling with me, my daughter Joan is extending 
my ministry by leading many other groups. Contact her if you 
would prefer a different date. She also has some outstanding 
opportunities available for pastors to earn a free trip. 




For information contact: 



Joan Meyer Keane 

McMurray Travel Service 

787 S. State St., Suite C 

Westerville, Ohio 43081 

1-800-783-2359 



WORTH TAX & 
FINANCIAL SERVICE 

3201 E. Center St. • Warsaw, IN 
Professional. . . but affordable 

• Specializes in tax preparation: ministers 

& payroll reports (by mail or in person) 

• Seminars for ministers & not-for-profit 
organizations (Attend one by us or sponsor one 
for us) 

• Publishes "Income Tax Law For 
Ministers & Religious Workers" & 
"Professional Tax Record Book" 

(Also church payroll sheets & other business forms) 

• Phone consultation or by appointment 

| ■ (Consultation fee based on length of time) 

SEND FOR INFORMATIONAL PACKETS 

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Telephone: 219-267-4687 

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In the 
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lies Lion 
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among the 
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and farm lands of the area. The 
home of the Penn State Nittany 
Lions is a thriving community 
with all the culture and 
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Here a 

committed 

core of 

believers seek 

a senior 

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reach the 

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world. If you would desire to 

learn more about this challenging 

opportunity, contact Jim Morton, 

P.O. Box 498, State College, PA 

16804 (814) 237-9724. 



C HEF^I1 



EDITORIAL 



TWENTY-MINE! 



by Jeff Carroll 



I 



.t was a warm spring night when I first met Tony 
and Debbie Romero. I had recently received Evangelism 
Explosion training and had been certified, so I took my 
team out and went looking for a victim. We decided to go 
visit Tony and Debbie. Debbie had come to our services 
through her best friend, a neighbor, who was a member 
of our church, but Tony had not yet sensed his need. We 
did share the gospel that night, and before we were done 
Debbie embraced Christ as her Savior. Tony told us that 
he'd certainly think over our conversation, but in his 
words, "Sundays are made for softball," so he wouldn't 
be seeing us at church. There was a time when I would 
have launched into a verbal battle, but I guess I've 
learned over time to wait until the Spirit prepares a 

person' s heart. 

Four years went by before I saw Tony again. One 
Sunday morning he and Debbie and their two boys came 
to church. After the service he came up to me and shared 
how much he liked being there. I could sense that the 
Holy Spirit had now prepared his heart. Two days later I 
received a call from Tony's neighbor asking me if I'd 
heard that Tony was in the hospital. As he related the 
story to me, it seems that one of Tony' s sons had come 
home from school with chicken pox and given the disease 
to Tony. Now chicken pox is not very pleasant when 
you're a little boy, but it is survivable. When you're a 
Dad, however, and get it, the consequences can be 
disastrous. The neighbor called once again; Tony was in 
intensive care. 

I knew that I should have gone up to the hospital 
sooner, but somehow the days got away from me. When 



I did arrive at the hospital, I found Tony covered from 
head to toe with chicken pox and in a coma. As a pastor, 
I was so burdened by the turn of events. I felt that the 
Spirit of God was moving in his life and here I was two 
days late. The gospel is only good news if it gets there in 
time. I talked to the nurses and they said to go ahead and 
read to him and pray with him, and that there was a good 
chance that he could hear. So I read and prayed and 
witnessed to Tony that day and two more consecutive 
days. 

On the fourth day I met the nurses and doctor in the 
hallway along with Debbie, Tony's wife. There they 
informed me that they were going to decrease Tony's 
sedative and try to bring him up out of the coma. Debbie 
and I entered the room, she on one side of the bed and I 
on the other. Tony' s eyes began to flicker and we felt him 
grab each of our hands. He wanted to sit up. He couldn't 

speak because of 
the tubes down his 
nose and throat. In 
the process of 
helping him sit up, 
I said, "Tony, you 
are very, very 
sick. I just want to 
know. Have you 
asked Jesus to 
come into your 
life to be your 
Savior?" I will 
never forget 
Tony's response. 
With all of his 
remaining strength, he nodded in the affirmative, that 
indeed he had! 

A few moments later, Tony' s two little boys were 
brought into the room. As I realized later, the purpose was 
to say goodbye to their father. Later that evening I 
received a call informing me that Tony had died at age 29 
of complications from chicken pox. 

February 14th is Valentine' s Day, one of my wife' s 
favorite holidays. We are always kind and considerate of 
each other on that day. But sometimes, throughout the 
year, there is friction and each time that I am tempted to 
lash out and demand my own selfish agenda, my mind 
drifts back to the little scene at the hospital room. It is there 
that I see what is really important in this life and how short 
that life really is. 

How, then, can I be mad, or hold a grudge, or be short 
with anyone? 



Ill / ^kj^ 

"1 


111 

1 ! 



ebruary 15, 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Brethren Missionary 



CHERALD 

Volume 56 No. 2 ^^^ February 1 5. 1 994 






February 15, 1994 

3 Editorial 
Twenty Nine! 

5 Church Focus 
Growing by Discipling 

6 Pastor of the Month 

An Evangelical Voice in the Inner City 

7 Women's Missionary Council 
Missionary of the Year 
Amy Volovski 

8 Interview with Robert Fetterhoff 

9 CE National 

Why Sunday Mornings Are 

Great for Adult Discipleship Groups. . . 

1 Catching Up With. . . Mike Singletary 

1 1 Coach Kessler to Hall of Fame 
Another (Yawn) Exciting 
List of Predictions 

1 2 Bodily Discipline Profiteth Little 

1 3 New President at Grace Schools 

Scott Puckett Resigns from Grace Village 

14 Taking Issue With Mac Arthur 

15 Article on Roy Lowrie 

16 Fellowship News 

1 7 Highlights from the Herald Newsline 



Would you have an opinion on anything you would like to share 

with the other readers of this magazine? If so, write to 

Brethren Missionary Herald Magazine 

P.O. Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

( 100 words or less) 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Ed Lewis 
Foreign Missions 
Tom Julien 
Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 
Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 
Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 
Nora Macon 
Cover Art by Jim Serra 

Herald News Service: 
1-800-32-32-BMH 
(including Indiana) 

The Brethren/Missionary Heraldisapubhcationoflhe Fellowship 
of Grace Brethren Churches, published monthly by the Brethren 
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Winona Lake, IN 46590. Telephone (219) 267-7158 

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For publication schedules contact Publisher, Jeff Carroll or 
Managing Editor, Dolores Gunn. 

1-800-348-2756. 8-5, EST. 



"HEJ^LD 



CHURCH FOCUS 



Growing 

By 
Discipling 

by John P. Burke, Pastor 

Waterloo, Iowa Grace Brethren Church 



jA n exciting formula for reaching 
/^k the world for Christ goes some- 
fr^^L thing like this: Set aside all 
M. .flL distractions and devote your- 
self to the singular activity of introducing 
one person to Chnst. Then, for the next 
six months, you intensively disciple that 
one individual to a point where he can 
join you in repeating the process, both of 
you, in turn, introduce two more people 
to Christ and pour your lives into them 
for the next six months. The four then 
reach four more. The eight reach eight, 
and so on. 

On paper it looks great. In fact, if 
this same process would be carried out 
to the 32nd generation , or 16 years, the 
entire world could be won to Christ. By 
then you would have made 
4,290,000,000 disciples! 

Thrilling to think about, isn't it? 
But the facts are that this concept breaks 
down in practical experience. You see, 
the formula contains a basic flaw. To be 
sure, the first step is great. My, what a 
joy to introduce someone else to Jesus 
Christ! But the flaw follows. The one 
who wins another person may not possess 
or utilize the spiritual gifts that are 
necessary to minister to the many, varied 
needs of new believers. Consequently, 
the process of reproduction breaks down. 

Thankfully, there is a happy solution 
to the problem - the church! According 
to Scripture, God Himself established 
the church (Matthew 16:18). 
Furthermore, the Bible says that He 
designed it in such a way that each local 
church has in operation those gifts of the 
Spirit that minister best to a new 
believer's life (Romans 12, 1 Corinthians 
12: Ephesians 4). When these gifts are 



exercised, a new believer is established in 
the faith, rooted deeply in Christ, built up, 
and equipped for ministry. In short, the 
local church is God's plan for reaching the 
world. 

Nearly a year ago, the leaders of our 
church met together for a day of prayer and 
planning. We asked ourselves three very 
candid questions: What is the purpose of 
our church? What is the primary goal to 
which our church is committed? What plan 
are we following to reach our goal? We 
were convinced that if we did not understand 
and agree in our answers on these three vital 
issues, for all practical purposes, our church 
growth feet were planted firmly in mid air! 
There was no way we could possibly develop 
a solid, Biblical discipling ministry from 
that position. 

The answer to the first of these 
questions was fairly easy. The primary 
purpose of our church is to glorify God 
(Ephesians 3:14-21). After 52 weeks of 
conducting meetings, spending huge sums 
of money, using facilities, and investing 
countless leadership hours, the bottom line 
question is not, "Did we fill the calendar?" 
or, "Did we have a good attendance?" 
Rather, the bottom line is, "Did it glorifv 
God?" 

Likewise, it wasn't all that hard to 
answer question two. We concluded that 
the primary goal of our church was to make 
disciples (Matthew 28:19, 20). Making 
disciples glorifies God. In fact, nothing 
glorifies Him any more than demonstrating 
that a typical church member, under the 
control of the Holy Spirit, can become 
increasingly more Christ-like. 

The answer to question three, however, 



was a little more difficult. Yet ourleaders 
were convinced that any local church, 
even our church, possesses the resources 
necessary to meet needs. More 
specifically, we concluded that an 
effective discipling emphasis must meet 
two critical needs: 

•Short term follow up to ground new 
believers in Christ. 

• Long term follow up to equip believers 
for ministry. 
At present, our "Growing By 
Discipling" strategy is just getting 
underway. However, we are pleased with 
what we have seen so far. A series of 
Discovery Classes are provided for new 
believers, or for those enjoying a recent 
spiritual awakening. Approximately 8 
12 people comprise a Discovery Class. 
Generally, the groups meet one hour 
weekly during the Sunday School period 
Added to the above, a small group 
discipling approach which we call 
"Growth Groups" is also in place. The 
group meeting breaks down into four 
basic parts: Bible discussion, sharing 
time, outreach planning, and prayer. 
Approximately 12-14 people comprise 
a Growth Group. They meet weekly in a 
home. 

We've learned so far that before 
you can enjoy a large operation you have 
to be content to start out small. Before 
you build a tower, you have to count the 
cost. Yet we have recognized the 
potential of a solid beginmng, even 
though it is small. We're satisfied that 
such things will provide the essential 
foundation for a continuing, healthy 
growth pattern during the years ahead. 



America, 
Weep for your Children 



23 Million 

Are 
No More 




ebruary 15, 1994 



PASTOR OF THE MONTH 



An Evangelical Voice 
In The Inner City 



w 



ilbert Ray Miller did not come 
to be the pastor of Toledo Grace Brethren 
Church in the usual way. That is - he is 
not the son of a Grace Brethren pastor; 
he did not come to know Christ in his 
youth; and he did not go to seminary. 

Ray, as he prefers to be called, grew 
up in an inner city neighborhood in 
Akron, Ohio. His mother was a devout 
Christian, but his father was not. His 
mother did as every 
Christian mother, 
saw to it that her 
child went to church. 
Therefore, Ray grew 
up in the church, but 
Christ and the church 
did not grow up in 
him. 

When he was 25 
years old, his mother 
suddenly and un- 
expectedly died of 
cancer. His mother 
was very special to 
him. Ray, like so 
many others, was 
driven to seek Christ 
honestly. He knew that his mother was 
going to Heaven and at that time he was 
not. 

Some peers at work introduced him 
to the gospel and the Grace Brethren 
Church. Ray and his wife, his high school 
sweetheart, felt that the Lord had some 
special task for them. However, the 
pastorate was far from their thoughts. 

Desiring to learn all that he could 
about the scriptures, Ray and his family 
regularly attended every Bible study that 
their church, Calvary GBC of Walbridge, 
Ohio, offered. It was not enough. 

Already having a wife and three 
children, it was not feasible for him to go 
away for further training. Oh, but the 




Lord answered his prayers! His prayer 
for further training was answered by the 
formation of the Grace Brethren Church 
Theological Practorium. In June of 1985, 
he received his diploma in Theology 
from the Practorium. All of the classroom 
instruction had been completed well over 
a year before. 

His experience of growing up in the 
inner city of Akron, Ohio, had made him 
keenly aware of the 
problems of urban 
life, and he 
desperately wanted 
to reach out. 

Four years 
after his con- 
version, Ray and 
Betty were in- 
troduced to an 
older Christian 
couple who also 
wanted to see an 
evangelical work 
started in the inner 
city. At the time 
this Christian 
couple belonged to 
an Alliance church. 

Believing that this meeting was of 
God, the two couples decided to start a 
Bible study at the home of the older 
couple, Gene and Clemmie Bourn, who 
actually lived in the inner city. On the 
recommendation of Ray's pastor, this 
study was initially taught by Jim Sisi, 
who was pursuing the pastorate. In 1 982, 
Ray, so he thought, was not considering 
the pastorate. He just wanted to be 
instrumental in bringing an evangelical 
church to the African-Americans who 
resided in Toledo. 

About two months after the study 
started, it was without a teacher. It seemed 
as though their infant idea of starting a 



Pastor Wilbert Ray Miller 



church had been snuffed out. With many 
prayers for direction, Ray became the 
leader of the study. The study had 
overcome its first crisis, only to be faced 
with another one. This time, the home 
itself where the study was being held 
was in question. Therefore, in March of 
1982, Ray moved the study to his own 
home where it continued for the next 
three years. 

A three-fold communion service 
was the turning point for this Bible study 
group. In the late fall of 1984 the group 
members decided to officially seek 
recognition as a Grace Brethren Church. 
By the first of the year the newly formed 
church had been incorporated in the 
state of Ohio. By mid-year they had 
recei ved district and national recognition 
as a Grace Brethren Church operating in 
Toledo. 

In the meantime, their future pas- 
tor was sacrificially preparing for the 
ministry as well as working full-time 
and raising a family. Things were hap- 
pening fast for the newly formed 
church.By the end of January 1985, 
Ray was a licensed pastor of the North 
Central Ohio District and the group was 
in the process of purchasing a church 
building. 

By March of 1985, Toledo Grace 
Brethren Church officially opened its 
doors and has been diligently carrying 
out the task of being an evangelical 
voice in the inner city of Toledo for 
Christ. 

Pastor Wilbert Ray Miller is the 
proud father of three children: Ray 
Maurice, his eldest, recently wedded 
Kimberlie Stovall; Shalon, his eldest 
daughter, is a junior in high school; and 
Felicia is an eighth grader. Betty is his 
wife of twenty some years. God has 
been good! 



cHEfyLD 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



AMY 
VOLOVSKI 

WMC Missionary of the Year 



i\my Bracker was bora in Berne, Indiana. When she 
was three years old, her family moved to Wilmore, Kentucky, 
where her father, Gordon Bracker, began his studies to become 
a pastor. Whe she was five, and with her father explaining the 
way, Amy received the Lord Jesus as her Savior. 

The Bracker family moved again when Amy was in 
second grade, this time to Winona Lake, Indiana, where her 
father entered Grace Seminary. From then on she was labeled 
a P.K. Her dad pastored in Cleveland, Ohio; Kittamiing, 
Pennsylvania; and Fremont, Ohio while she still lived "under 
his roof. " 

As a young person, Amy was very involved in SMM, and 
even served as national Vice President for several years. She 
says that the SMM program made her very aware of our Grace 
Brethren missionaries and where they served. 

Amy attended Grace College, where she received a degree 
in Elementary Education. While there, she began dating Mike 
Volovski, and they were married between her junior and senior 
years of college. (By the time Amy graduated from college, 
there were five children in the Bracker family, the youngest 
one, a girl, being bora a few weeks before Amy's college 
graduation. This sister, Rachel Jackson is a missionary in 
Germany. Rachel was a WMC Missionary of the Year a few 
years ago.) 

Amy and Mike have two children. Their son Jon and his 
wife live in Fayette ville, North Carolina, where he is stationed 
with the Air Force. Daughter Rebecca and her husband and 
children live in Altoona, Pennsylvania, where her husband is 
a light and sound technician. The ages of Amy and Mike's 
grandchildren (two girls and a boy) range from three to seven 
years of age. Amy says that one of the hardest things about 
missionary service is having to leave children and grandchildren. 

Amy' s hobbies are reading, sewing, and home decorating. 
She especially likes reading historical novels. She makes 
almost all of her own clothes in Africa. She has enjoyed 
decorating their home in each place where they've lived, as 
well as decorating guest houses on Bata station in the CAR. 
She says it is a challenge to decorate on a "shoestring," and it 
is very satisfying to see the outcome. Their home at Bata is 
much nicer than they ever dreamed it would be. They have 
running water and an inside bathroom. There are two bedrooms, 
so they use one as a study. They have electricity I'll hours each 
night, and for two hours two mornings a week to use their 
washing machines. They have a 12-volt battery system so they 
can still have a light in every room when there is no electricity. 

Bata station (where the missionaries live) is surrounded by 
three villages - one Africian student village and two villages of 
other Africians. There are usually six or seven family units or 




single missionaries living 
on the station. The 
Missionary Children's 
School and the Bible 
Institute and Seminary are 
all located at Bata. 

Amy shared the 
following about why they 
are missionaries today: 

"When our children 
were young we began 
thinking about going to 
Africa as missionaries. I 
should clarify that - it was 
my husband who thought 
about it. I never gave him 

negative feedback, but in my heart I did not really want to go. 
Several circumstances prevented our going at that time but as 
the years went by, my husband would say he would still like to 
go to Africa when our children were raised. Again, in my heart, 
I was hoping it would never happen. 

"However, in the spring of 1983, God changed my heart. 
Mike was teaching full time at a Christian college and I was 
teaching full time at a Christian school. The college was going 
through a leadership change and there were financial problems. 
Mike was told he would have to go on part-time salary. We both 
knew we were going to have to make a change because we were 
barely making it financially on our two full-time salaries. 

"I found myself suggesting [that he] call Grace Brethren 
Foreign Missions to see what needs thay had in the CAR. He 
was told that there was an immediate need for a Greek and 
Hebrew teacher in the seminary at Bata. Since those were the 
subjects he had been teaching, we both immediately felt this 
was an indication that God wanted us in Africa. Later (after we 
had made our decision to go) we found out there was a need 
for a teacher for the MK's. That doubly confirmed our call 
since I had been an elementary teacher for many years. 

"After studying French for a school year in Albertville, 
France, we were on our way to the C.A.R. to be involved in 
teaching ministries there. Both of us have been teaching there 
since 1984. Our first two years were on a short-term basis under 
the auspices of CE National in the TIME program. We became 
career missionaries under GBFM the summer of 1985." 

Amy teaches grades 1-6 in the Missionary Children's 
School at Bata. She says that is her main area of ministry, and 
is very time consuming. One year she had five different grade 
levels to teach. She also gets involved in other ministries such 
as station hostessing and bookkeeping, teaching African ladies 
to sew, and helping them with reading. 

Amy was asked, "Is there anything else you want to share 
with WMC - or any challenge you want to give?" She replied, 
"From my experience of thinking I could not be happy in 
foreign land and culture, I have learned that if I am where God 
wants me I can be happy. Don't be afraid to say yes to the 
leading of the Lord. He will supply all your needs - even the 
need for happiness." 



ebruary 15, 1994 



NATIONAL CONFERENCE 



INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT D. FETTERHOFF, 

MODERATOR, FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES 



What do you believe to be the spirit 
throughout the FGBC today? 

I believe the prevailing attitude in most of 
our churches is cautious optimism. We 
gained new momentum at our recent 
Conference in Billings, Montana that is 
building. We have spent too long spinning 
our wheels. There is a new desire building 
to move ahead for the glory of Christ and 
His Kingdom. 

For the past ten years, our Fellowship 
has been caught in a theological quagmire. 
We have evaluated and re-evaluated, 
defined and re-defined what we believe. 
Some of that may have been necessary, 
but the prevailing spirit among our people 
is to "get on" with what God has for us. 

Many churches are using creative and 
innovative methods to impact the world 
with the Gospel. I'm meeting pastors who 
have a great vision for what God can do 
with their churches. It's wonderful to talk 
with people who have a sense of excite- 
ment about the future. 

But all of that is flavored with a sense of 
caution because of the struggles we have 
experienced in recent years. I believe 
Satan "has taken advantage of us. 
" We've taken a heavy blow from him... 
because he has caused us to spend 
countless hours focused on issues other 
than how to reach as many people for 
Christ as we can in as many ways as we 
can for as long as we can! Sincere issues 
have been discussed, but Satan has 
laughed all the way to the bank. Many of us 
believe that God is now giving us new life, 
new hope, new enthusiasm, and new vision. 

What do you believe are the critical 
issues facing the FGBC today? 

Several months ago, someone shared 
with me three important questions that we 
need to consider as a Fellowship: 
1) Who are we? 2) How can we pull 
together? 3) Where are we going? 

The first question is being answered 
through FOCUS retreats held across the 
country this year. Leaders of our churches 
are coming together to discuss and review 
our history and heritage . A special moment 



in my life recently occurred when pastors 
gathered at Mohican State Park in Ohio for 
fellowship and encouragement. I encourage 
pastors in other areas of the nation to participate 
in their FOCUS retreats. 

We're discovering the glory of a heritage that 
says we have a commitment to the authority of 
the Scriptures in our lives characterized by 
personal holiness. 

The other two questions relate to our collective 
sense of vision. Proverbs 29:18 says, "Where 
there is no vision, the people cast off restraint." 
I believe our Fellowship has experienced some 
of the internal tensions in recent years because 
no one has clearly articulated where we need 
to go in the future. 

I'm convinced we now have a road map 




Robert D. Fetterhoff 

for the future of our Fellowship. It's called "The 
Masterplan." Somebody has called "The 
Masterplan" the "best kept secret in our 
Fellowship." Thisdocument, which wasapproved 
at Conference several years ago, gives us a 
clear direction for the future. 

My desire is to pull out of that Masterplan 
specific goals for our Conference in Florida 
which will give our Fellowship a clear vision for 
the future. 

You mentioned the '94 Conference in 
Florida. Tell us about your desire for that 
Conference. 

I'm asking people across this country to pray 



that God will "ignite new vision" in our 
hearts. I believe the people of the FGBC 
need a new sense of comraderie that will 
cause us to pull together with a new hope 
for what God can do through our efforts. 

I 'm praying that God will enable us to see 
the significant role we can have in the 
Church of Jesus Christ as we approach AD 
2000. Our Fellowship can contribute much 
to the cause of Christ in the coming years, 
but we must focus on the primary tasks 
before us. 

We are planning a Conference that will 
seek to ignite vision in the heart of every 
attender. We've invited speakers like R.C. 
Sproul, Knute Larsen, Jim Custer, Dan 
Allen, H.B. London, Bill Bright, and Ed 
Lewis to challenge our hearts to dream 
new dreams. We'll be hosting musicians 
like Steve Green, Christine Wyrtzen and 
Greg Buchanan, who will lift our hearts to 
worship God in a fresh way. 

My desire is that conference will be a 
source of inspiration, encouragement, and 
exhilaration for people who have come 
seeking a fresh encounter with God. The 
Conference is designed to provide vitality 
for weary pastors, encouragement for 
struggling church leaders, and spiritual 
motivation for everyone. 

I encourage every reader to consider the 
possibility of attending our 1994 National 
Conference atGrenelefe Resort in Orlando, 
FL. Registration information and reservation 
forms are available through your local 
churches. A promotional video is also 
available through our Conference 
Coordinator, Charles Ashman (219-269- 
1269). I'm looking forward to a great time 
with hundreds of Brethren from all across 
the world. 

Bob, how would you encourage 
people in our churches to pray for 
the FGBC? 

Please pray for God's spirit to give us 
new momentum for the future. Pray that 
our hearts will be bonded together, not only 
because of our unique heritage, but also 
because of the wonderful relationships we 
enjoy with each other in Christ. Pray that 
petty divisions will be healed. Pray that a 
new vibrancy spreads across our 
Fellowship like wildfire. Like one writer 
said, pray for a "Fresh wind of the Spirit." 



C HEI^LD 



CE NATIONAL 




Why Sunday Mornings 

are Great Times for Adult 

Discipleship Groups: 



1. The children can be trained at the same time through 
Sunday School. 



It's not another night out. If it's difficult getting people to 
commit to a discipleship group an hour before or after the 
worship service, it's even more difficult to get them to 
commit time outside of "normal" church hours. 



The church is given the opportunity for group discipleship 
of believers, rather than having it happen outside of the 
church. 



It's a simple way to do "shepherding" as the leaders will 
know their discipleship group members' needs. 



5. It's a simple and flexible format (topic, discusion, prayer, 
sharing, coffee). 



It develops a stronger tie between the group and the 
church. People may be more willing to participate in 
church ministries such as choir, VBS, or church visitation. 



Church communication is simplified. Church-family 
news, prayer concerns, projects, or coming events can 
be communicated through discipleship group leaders. 



A discipleship group is the logical "next step" after a 
person attends Sunday morning worship. 



Church Outreach 

Can Be Encouraged By: 

• Showing the Navigator's "Living Proof video series (1-800- 
366-7788). 

• Participating in and praying for the youth evangelistic event, 
"See You at the Party," on March 5. Contact CE National for 
more information. 

• Conducting VBS and camps aimed at non-churched children. 
Consider having camp scholarships to help those who can't 
otherwise attend. 

• Encouraging a prayer group to be praying during invitation 
times. 

• Designating an evangelism Sunday using a name such as 
"Friend Day" and having a special speaker or music. 

• Allowing for 20 minutes of sharing on occasional Sunday 
evenings related to ideas on evangelism. 

• Encouraging the congregation's families to invite non- 
churched families to their home for a Sunday dinner. 

• Using "Target Three" accountability cards. Contact CE 
National to order those cards. 

• Beginning all elders' meetings with sharing about personal 
evangelism opportunities. 

• Having a church musical and "open house." 

• Using Evangelism Explosion training. 

• Conducting community surveys. A survey form is available 
from CE National. 

• Hosting a men's outreach breakfast which will include 
testimonies and fellowship. 

• Organizing a community outreach get-together for Memorial 
Day, Labor Day, or other holiday. 

• Setting outreach goals and budgets. 

• Holding Serendipity Bible studies (which can be used either 
for outreach in special areas of need or general community 
outreach). 



A Different Perspective 

According to World Development Forum, if the world were a town of 1,000 people there would be 564 Asians, 210 
Europeans, 86 Africans, 80 South Americans, and 60 North Americans. It also states that 700 people would be 
illiterate and 500 would be hungry. 

Born Again 

The percentage of American adults who claim to be born again (by region of the country) are: 

South 44% Central 36% Northeast 24% 

Southwest 42% Mountain 34% Pacific 24% 

For more current statistical information please contact: The Barna Research Group, P.O. Box 4152, Glendale. CA 91222. Phone: (818) 241-9684. 

Up and Coming 

March 5 is "See You at the Party." It is an evangelistic event for youth. 

March 6 is National Children's Sunday. It is a day especially designated to honor children and children's ministries. 

Bulletin inserts and information have been sent to each church. 



February 15, 1994 



SPORTS 



CATCHING UP WITH... 



By Tom Felton 

When Mike Singeltary talks... 
people listen. Not because he' s going to 
offer some sage financial advice either- 
al though, as bright as he is, it' s probable 
he could. No, it's simply because he 
shares words worth hearing. One 
important topic he will discuss is the 
value of saving sex for marriage. 

There was a time before he was 
married when he cheated on his wife-to- 
be, Kim. Several years later, after truly 
committing his life to Christ, he felt the 
need to tell her what he had done. It was 
an extremely painful but necessary 
revelation for both of them-it hurt and 
humiliated Kim-but the Singletarys 
were able to turn to their single source of 
comfort and strength for restoration and 
healing: Jesus Christ. 

Mike reflects on his years of being 
a star on the field at Baylor, while playing 
the field in his person life: "I thought I 
knew everything. I wish there would 
have been someone in my life, someone 
who cared about me and would have 
pulled me aside and talked to me. Rather 
than saying, 'Mike you're great. Mike 
you're doing good at this.' But no one 
gave me any of the real good stuff that I 
needed for life. What it took was me, 
with a repentant heart, asking the 
forgiveness of a holy God and receiving 
His grace in my life." 

Singletary , with the same controlled 
intensity he possessed as middle 
linebacker for the Bears, believes that 
the Bible is the Word of God. It' s in the 
Bestseller-of -all-time that he found truth 
to claim what he perceives as the best 
way to live. 

It's easy to like Mike. But to be like 
Mike means that you can recite Bible 
verses such as 1 Corinthians 12:2, which 
says, "Do not conform any longer to the 
pattern of this world, but be transformed 




by the renewing of your mind." 

Singletary says, "That statement 
cuts against the grain of what's 
happening today. When you look at 
Hollywood and what they're trying to 
sell you, it' s a lie. Look at the magazines 
and the newspapers, they' re saying that 
' this is the 90s, you got to loosen up. Do 
your own thing. It's all right.'" But 
Singletary wishes someone had told him 
the truth and "saved me a lot of trouble. " 

Cutting to the core of the issue, 
Samurai Mike presents the following 
guidelines about finding and maintaining 
the right view of sex: 

• Wait until you 're married. 'God 
meant for sex to be within marriage. He 
meant for there to be one special night. 
Satan has taken sex and made it 
something cheap." 

'Instead of safe sex, save sex. "Even 
if someone says they love you, even if 




Collegiate numbers: 662 tackles, 351 solos, 

6 fumble recoveries 

Played 12 NFL seasons with the Chicago Bears 

Made 1,488 tackles in 191 games 

Had 20 tackles in one game (Denver Broncos, 

November 18, 1990) 



Awards/Honors: 

Two-time All-American at Baylor University 
Southwest Conference Player of the Year twice 
1990 NFL Man of the Year 
NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 1985, 1988 
Named to 10 Pro Bowl teams 



you think they mean it — hold on to what 

you have. Hold on to your virginity and 

honor God with it! " 

• If you're being pressured to have 

sex-resist. "Sex is special. If someone 
says, 'Hey, if you don't do it 
I'm leaving,' let him go. If he 
loves you, he will come back." 

• Choose carefully the 
people you spend time with. 
"First Corinthians 15:33 says, 
' Bad company corrupts good 
character.' Choose yourfriends 
very carefully. Friends that will 
not lower their standards or 
compromise the Word of God. " 

• Study the Bible to learn 
the truth about sex. "In John 
8:32 it says, 'You will know 
the truth and the truth will set 
you free.' Understand that your 
body is the temple of Jesus 
Christ. FJnderstand that you are 
loved. Understand the price that 
has been paid-Christ's blood 
that has been shed for you." 

These tough yet tender 
words come from one of the 
greatest defenders ever to play 
the game. When Number 50 played, he 
knew the appropriate time to blitz the 
quarterback. But when Mike needed to 
cover a receiver, he strove to mirror the 
opposing player's every move 
gracef ull y- wi thout laying a hand on him . 
If he blitzed when he w as supposed to be 
covering, it could mean a loss for his 
team. 

Singletary knows what it means to 
stay within the game plan. He showed 
restraint by knowing what his linebacker 
position demanded and doing only what 
would best help the team. 

He also knows that the same type of 
restraint is needed in our lives to make 
the right decisions about sex. Singletary 
tells his listeners that if they fail to wait, 
if they don't make the correct choice, 
they have taken something God considers 
beautiful and ruined it by settling for a 
cheap substitute. 

Mike says, "Sex outside of marriage 
is going to lead you down the wrong 
path." 

Listen. Those are words worth 
hearing and heeding. 

Reprinted by permission of Sports Spectrum 

For information on Sports Spectum Magazine ca« 1-800-653-8333 



"HERALD 



Coach 
Kessler 

to Hall of Fame 



HALL OF FAME — Grace College 
men' s basketball head coach Jim Kessler 
has been nominated to the National 
Christian College Athletic Association s 
Hall of Fame. He will be inducted into 
the hall of fame in March at a ceremony 
in Marion. 

Coach Kessler began coaching at 
Grace College, his alma mater, in 1975 
and has held the position of head coach 



for the past 16 years. His accomp- 
lishments include a career record of 337- 
1 92, nine Mid-Central Conference Coach 




of the Year honors, nine Mid-Central 
Conference championships, two NAIA 
District 21 championships, four NAIA 
District 21 Coach of the Year honors, 
and the 1992 NAIA Division II National 
Coach of the Year alter leading the men 
to a national title. 

Kessler has long been involved with 
and active in the NCCAA. He most 
recently served as the national 
coordinator for basketball during the 
1992-93 season. He was selected for the 
hall of fame based on his outstanding 
leadership and service. 

Coach Kessler and his wife, 
Susanne, live in Winona Lake and are 
the parents of four daughters, Kimberly, 
Sarah, Jennifer and Janelle. 



Coach Jim Kessler 



Another (Yawn) Exciting 
List of Predictions 



John Davis, professor of Old Testament 
at Grace Seminary, is also a columnist 
for his Iiome town newspaper. He obliged 
us the opportunity to reprint a portion of 
his January 15, 1994 article. 

The landscapes of our land are 
overrun with prophetic pretenders 
making outrageous statements and if the 
record is not set straight, yet more doom 
and despair will cloud the fruited plain. 

I know that my prophecy and 
fulfillment record for the past 13 years 
(0 for 398) has not exactly sparkled with 
untarnished success, but just remember 
there are Chicago Cubs batters getting 
paid big bucks for even worse averages ! 

It was under the light of a full moon 
on the west shore of Big Chapman Lake 
that I penned the following. You will 
immediately sense the profundity of the 
following powerful prognostications. 

1 . The President Clinton economic 
plan will definitely create jobs in 1994. 
Everyone will have to get a second job to 
pay off retroactive taxes. 

2. Ross Perot's political 
organization will dwindle down 



significantly this year and be renamed, 
"United 1 Stand." 

3. The New York City Marathon 
will have 1 7 false starts this year because 
of gunfire in the streets. 

4. Vice President At Gore will 
attempt to impress the environmentalist 
crowd by confiscating all the wood bats 
of major league baseball teams, taking 
them out to the forest, and setting tliem 
free. 

5. President Bill Clinton will 
attempt to destabilize Iran 's economy 
by circulating huge piles of worthless 
money in their country . Recognizing tfiat 
this is no job for amateurs, he will call in 
our nation's experts to oversee the 
project - House Democrats. 

6. Look for judges and the courts to 
get tougher with criminals. They will 
hand out much longer suspended 
sentences. 

7. Federal Courts will tighten up 
on prison release programs. This year 
no felon will be released unless there's 
an emergency or he 's up for reelection. 

8. Salmon Rushdie will appear on 



the television show "This Old House" 
showing different ways to decorate an 
attic. 

Now be honest; aren' t you glad you 
read this today? This prose production is 
not just political prattle, but poignantly 
powerful predictions producing 
perspectives of peace and prosperity for 
the new year. 

fiat your heart out. Rush Limbaugh. 




John Davis 



ebruary IS, 1994 



BODILY DISCIPLINE 

Profiteth Nothing 



I' m a marathoner. Well . . . 
that's not the complete truth. 
26.2 miles is a long way to 
run. Actually I'm an ultra- 
marathoner. Dr. Horton, of the 
Physical Education 

Department of Liberty 
University, organizes an 
annual event called "The HIIHa i^^^^i^ 
Mountain Masochist Trail 

Run 50 Miler." It goes over the Blue Ridge Mountains near 
Lynchburg, Virginia. (I'm surprised he hasn't been lynched by 
the unsuspecting runners.) I finished 22nd out of a field of 2 1 7 
starters in 9 hours 4 minutes and 7 seconds. 

So what does one do to top that? How about running 40 
miles on my 40th birthday ? O.K. It took 6 hours 34 minutes and 
25 seconds. Therefore, I wasn't surprised when several friends 
asked me if I was going to run 41 miles on my 41st birthday. 
As January 1 8th approached, I wondered. 

I also wondered what God really means in I Timothy 4:8. 
The NTV reads, "For physical training is of some value. . ." and 
the KJV translates "profiteth little." Profiteth little!?! Some 
value!?! Running is the solution to all of life's problems! All 
areas of one's life are benefited: physical, emotional, mental, 
social, economical, and even spiritual. Right? But those words 
of God kept pricking my conscience. Is it possible that I've 
overdone it? Are my priorities a bit out of balance? True, it 
takes many hours to train for such events. True, the rewards are 
few and temporal. True, I may extend both the quality and 
quantity of my earthly sojourn. But eventually I will die. 

The verse goes on to say, ", . . but godliness has value for 
all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life 
to come." The contrast is set. Physical training is good for the 
here and now. But training in godliness is better because it 
benefits the here and now and hereafter. 

So maybe I should find a nice balance between physical 
training and godliness training. After all, I am not just a runner. 
I am also a Christian, a husband of a wonderful wife, father of 
four delightful growing children who won't be children much 
longer, and a pastor of a fine flock of God's people. 

Last night, January 18th (my birthday), I lay on my couch 
and tried to relate to couch potatoes as I came to grips with the 
number 4 1 . It was different. I picked up Oswald chambers' My 
Utmost for His Highest and read these words from the January 
1 8th selection, "Beware of anything that competes with loyalty 
to Jesus Christ." Even jogging? Even jogging! A timely 
challenge from a sovereign God. I also picked up my One Year 



Physical training is good for the 

here and now. But training in 

godliness is better because it benefits 

the here and now and hereafter. 



Bible . These are two of my 

1994 spiritual growth goals. 

My 41st birthday came 

and went and I never touched 

my jogging shoes. But I did 

touch some other things on 

that day such as God, my 

children, my wife, and the 

KHaanHHnannHM lives of wonderful church 

members who phoned to say, 

"Happy Birthday." It was different. I liked it. 

My life is half over. I asked myself, "Do I want to be 
known as one who accomplishes great physical feats, or as one 
who attempts great things for personal godliness and for God?" 
As I strategize for "running" the second half of my life, the 
answer seems clear. Godliness first, jogging second. 




Dan Gillette 



Dan Gillette has pastored the Grace Brethren Church in 
Covington, Virginia for 9 years. He graduated from Grace 
Theological Seminary in 1984 with the Master ofDivinty and 
the Master of Arts in Biblical Counseling degrees. His wife, 
Lois, and children, Jessica, Joanna, Jacinda, and Jordan also 
enjoy an occasional jog and a few 5K races. 



C HE^LD 



NEWS ITEMS 



NEW PRESIDENT 

AT 

! SCHOOLS 




The Manahan Family 



The Board of Trustees of Grace College and Seminary 
is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Ronald E. 
Manahan as the fifth President of Grace College and 
Seminary. Rev. Charles Thornton, Chairman of the Board, 
made the announcement to the administration, faculty, staff, 
and students. 

Dr. Manahan has served Grace for 17 years. From 1977 
to 1986 he held the position of Professor of Biblical Studies. 
From 1 987 to 1990 he served as Vice president of College 
Academic Affairs, from 1990 to 1993 as Provost, and from 
1993 to the present as Acting President. Dr. Manahan holds 
a Diploma from Grand Rapids School of the Bible and 
Music, a B.A. from Shelton College, and an M.Div., Th.M. 
and Th.D. from Grace Theological Seminary. 

Dr. Manahan brings to the presidency a courageous 
vision for the future of Grace. "I believe that proactive 
leadership is required to transform what is good about Grace 
and make it even better — better for students and better for 
those our graduates will serve. I want Grace to contribute to 
our community and to our world. Accepting this role in the 
education of the next generations of leaders is both humbling 
and invigorating," says Manahan. 

The Presidential Inauguration in honor of Dr. Manahan 
will take place in the early fall. 

Grace College, located in Winona Lake, Indiana, is a 
four year Christian liberal arts college in its 46th year of 
educating men and women for effective lives of character, 
competence, and service. Grace Theological Seminary is in 
its 56th year of developing ministry leaders able to influence 
culture with an integrated biblical world view. 



Scott Puckett 
Resigns From 
Grace Village 

The resignation of Scott Puckett, Grace Village's CEO 
and Health Care Administrator, was announced January 
26th. Scott has accepted the CEO position at Wesley Manor 
Retirement Community in Frankfort, Indiana, and will begin 
that position toward the end of March. 

Scott came to Grace Village in August of 1991 and has 
been used by God to accomplish what seems like a miracle. 
Under his leadership. . . 

• Occupancy has grown from 79% to an amazing 98%! 

• Revenues have increased by $1.5 million. 

• Expenses have decreased by approximately $400,000. 

• In the fiscal year prior to Scott's arrival, Grace Village 
had an operating deficit of $1 million; in this current 
fiscal year they are projecting a surplus of $50,000. 

• Grace Village successfully completed a Chapter 1 1 
reorganization. Legally, Grace Village could have 
walked away from its debt. Instead, Scott and his board 
obeyed biblical mandates and developed a plan to repay 
all debt with a competitive rate of return. They have met 
and exceeded the reorganization requirements and are 
ahead of schedule. 

During Scott's tenure, staff prayer teams were formed 
to pray weekly for health care residents, touching their lives 
both physically and spiritually. Several former residents are 
now in Heaven because a staff prayer team shared the gospel . 
Also encouraging is the recent step of the Retirement 
Community to solicit prayer requests from area churches so 
the residents can serve as prayer warriors. 

The board of directors of Grace Village is moving 
quickly to establish an interim organizational structure while 
the search begins for the best leader to move the Village 
forward into an exciting future. 



QUAKE TOLL 



DEAD: 



51 



INJURED: 



4,500 



HOMELESS: 



15,000 



DAMAGE: 



Up to $30 billion 



UTILITIES: About 8,000 customers without power; 
35,000 without gas; 50,000 without water. 



February 15, 1994 



Taking Issue With 
MacArfhur 



Have you read Ashamed of the Gospel 
by Dr. John MacArthur? The following 
is a critique of the book by Dr. Elmer 
Towns. What do you think? Write us at 
the Herald and let us know. 

In this volume, MacArthur attacks the use 
of "user-friendly" strategies advocated by many 
church strategists including George Barna. 
Barna suggests that evangelistic outreach should 
be sensitive to the needs of the unsaved, and he 
provides tools to help church leaders better 
understand unsaved people in order to reach 
them with the gospel. 

The first problem I have with Mac Arthur' s 
book is that he uses an unusual and questionable 
basis for his attack on Barna. He introduces as 
the basis for his attack an obscure doctrinal 
controversy that erupted in England at the 
beginning of this century called the "Down 
Grade Controversy." 

Since almost no one knows what this 
controversy was, MacArthur tries to describe 
the term "down grade" as drawn from a picture 
of a church traveling up a mountain to reach its 
height, but liberalism has turned the church 
downward, and the church is on the "down 
grade" to destruction. 

One of the principal opponents of the 
down grade movement was Charles Spurgeon, 
pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle in 
London. Spurgeon did all he could to stop the 
down grade, even to the point of risking his own 
ministry. MacArthur sees himself as a Charles 
Spurgeon, although he denies making the 
analogy. MacArthur is risking an attack on 
brothers such as Bill Hybels (unnamed) and 
Barna (specifically targeted) because 
MacArthur feels they have put the church on 
the down grade. 

To make a comparison between Barna 
and the Down Grade Controversy suggests that 
MacArthur doesn't understand the issues. The 
Down Grade Controversy involves an attempt 
to change the content of Christian theology, i.e. 
liberalism. The user-friendly church movement 
is about methodology, not theology. 

The second problem I have is the narrow 
basis MacArthur uses to draw his mandate for 
ministry (1 and 2 Timothy). No evangelical 
would ever doubt the model for pastoral ministry 
that's based on Jesus' command to the church 
in the Great Commission. 

In the extensive and exclusive quotations 
of Paul's exhortation to Timothy lies the one- 
sidedness of MacArthur' s thesis. MacArthur 
forgets that the purpose of the church is the 
Great Commission — to make disciples of all 
nations (Matthew 28:19). Therefore, the 



church's aim is to reach out to the lost with the 
gospel. MacArthur apparently believes the church's 
aim is a single technique-tough preaching. 

A third weakness of Mac Arthur's book lies in 
his incorrect view of the church growth movement. 
He has been quick to criticize this movement, 
implying that its goal is only numerical growth. I'm 
not sure he understands the movement. 

The movement's goal has always been to 
pursue the Great Commission and to help church 
leaders reach the lost in their communities. Within 
the church growth movement there are six church 
worship models, one of which MacArthur has 
perfected: 

The Bible expositional church 
emphasizes Bible teaching, exegesis, and references 
to the Greek text. Grace Community Church and 
MacArthur's preaching are excellent examples. 

The evangelistic church could be a Southern 
gospel church or a seeker-driven church, such as 
the one pastored by Hybels, who is sensitive to 
"unchurched Harry." This church is driven by 
outreach and evangelism. 

The renewal church emphasizes excitement 
and revival, in which people sing praise choruses, 
lift hands in worship, and seek God at the altar. 

The body life church emphasizes fellowship, 
koinonia, and relationships, such as the Korean 
model of cell churches. 

The liturgical church emphasizes formal 
worship, dignity, and the reverence of the sanctuary. 

The congregational church is the church of 
the people, such as Brethren, Community, Free, or 
Baptist churches. 

When MacArthur criticizes the user-friendly 
church because it's seeker-driven in outreach, he's 
blind to his own bias and commitment to the Bible 
expositional church. MacArthur should understand 
that a church that worships differently from the 
model he practices is not wrong; it is merely 
different, and the people express their worship 
differently. This represents a difference of 
methodology. Interestingly, the New Testament 
never provides a methodological model for church 
meeting. 

Perhaps MacArthur isn't considering the 
nature of spiritual gifts. While he has the gift of 
teaching, he doesn't recognize that other pastors 
have a different gift mix, hence their ministry is 
expressed differently. Why would he want someone 
with the dominant gift of evangelism to express 
pastoral ministry as he does? Or should the minister 
who has the gift of exhortation become a teacher, 
just because MacArthur ministers from that model 
so successfully? 

A fourth problem appears in the appendix in 
which MacArthur examines Charles Finney and 
the Second Great Awakening. Perhaps because 
MacArthur is a Calvinist. he suggests that Finney 



had an aversion to orthodoxy. Obviously, Finney 
was an Arminian and held to that position. In 
the appendix, MacArthur tries to discredit 
Finney's conversion experience and his 
scholarship, and he explains away the results of 
Finney ' s crusades. He accuses Finney of having 
a pragmatic aproach to evangelism. As I 
carefully read MacArthur's attacks on Finney, 
I came to the strong assumption that MacArthur 
hasn't read Finney's Lectures on Revival. 

Finney's key statement was "the right use 
of the appropriate means," a phrase that he 
repeated many times and today is studied by 
scholars who examine revivalism. MacArthur 
wrongly suggests that the phrase means the use 
of gimmicks, advertisements, and other forms 
of outward stimuli to bring about revival. 
MacArthur seems unaware that Finney defined 
the appropiate means as prayer, fasting, 
humility, and the promises of 2 Chronicles 7:14 
that, when properly followed, would bring about 
revival. MacArthur's representation of Finney 
has no basis in historical fact or research. 

Has MacArthur read Barna's books 
carefully? The very thing MacArthur attacks 
(i.e., comprising the message) Barna clearly 
addresses. Barna says we're not to "compromise 
the gospel of the historic faith of the church just 
to make friends" with unsaved people. Barna 
reinforces this message numerous times in his 
books. 

I think MacArthur would agree with Barna 
if he understood the characteristics of a user- 
friendly church, which Barna lists as vision; 
participatory, non-ritualistic prayer; evangelism 
done by the laity and encouraged by the minister; 
dynamic youth programs that adults strongly 
support; and a flexible structure. 

Mac Arthur has judged a whole movement 
of churches (i.e., the evangelistic church model) 
by the writings of one person (i.e., George 
Barna). Is this not a narrow basis from which to 
write a book? 

I advise MacArthur, "You can't fight 
yesterday's battles to win today's victories and 
live successfully for God tomorow." We must 
learn from the past, but we can't live in the past. 
The Great Commision is a challenge to the 
church, such a great challenge that it should 
consume all of our energy. We must not waste 
our energies fighting our brothers in Chnst but 
must focus our energies on carrying out the 
mandate that has been given to all of us. 

While I appreciate MacArthur's desire to 
seek biblical truth, I believe he has gone too far 
in painting a black or white picture of the 
church growth movement. It's important that 
Christians be aware of both sides of the 
argument. 

Elmer Towns 

Vice Presiem, Dean of the School of Religion 

Liberty University 

Lynchburg, VA 

Printed by Permission 



14 



C HEF^LD 



Rojf Lowrie 

dies unexpectedly 



Professor Emeritus Roy Lowrie died 
unexpectedly of an apparent heart attack 
January 29 at his home in South Carolina. 
He was 66. 

Dr. Lowrie was a graduate of 
Philadelphia College of the Bible and 
Wheaton College. He held Master's and 
Doctorate degrees in Education from 
Temple University. 

For 28 years he was the Headmaster 
of the well known Delaware County 



Christian School in Newtown Square, 
Pennsylvania just outside Philadelphia. 
He was also a Christian camp director 
including 21 years at Camp Sankanac. 

As Executive Director of the 
National Association of Christian 
Schools, Dr. Lowrie was one of the 
leaders in the merger that created the 
Association of Christian Schools 
International (ACSI). After that merger 
he was named the President of ACSI. 

Dr. Lowrie was the Director of the 
National Institute of Christian School 
Administration from 1971 to 1993, and 
Director of Grace Seminary's MA. 
Program in Christian School 
Administration from 1986 until 1993. In 
1994 that program was relocated to 



Columbia Bible College, Columbia, 
South Carolina. 

On behalf of Christian school 
ministries, Dr. Lowrie traveled 
extensively in the United States as well 
as the Dominican Republic, Bahamas, 
Japan, Korea, Okinawa, Hong Kong, 
and the Philippines. 

He was an author, conference 
speaker, and the producer and host of a 
radio program heard on several Christian 
stations. 

A memorial service honoring Dr. 
Lowrie was held at Delaware County 
Christian School Saturday, February 5. 

Dr. Lowrie is survived by his wife 
Margaret "Peg", four daughters, and one 
son. 



J^wkfeewews 



Pastors At Risk, by H.B. London, Jr. and Neil B. 
Wiseman, Victor Books, 1993, 240 pages, $14.99. 

Two pastors (London and Wiseman) with over fifty 
years of experience in the pastorate have written this 
book because they have found so many of their colleagues 
in distress. The book is divided into three parts: 1. 
Comprehending the Risks, 2. Surviving the Storm, and 3. 
Renewing the Pastor. Three things stand out early in the 
book also. Balance between ministry and the family is 
often difficult to maintain. "Burnout" is sometimes 
experienced when pastors forget the purpose of their 
ministry. Budgeting of time and money becomes a problem 
as well. In each chapter there are risk factors noted and 
at the close of each chapter are the contemporary 
challenges. The last chapter of the book is the most 
comprehensive as the authors talk about the twelve 
steps to overcoming the risks. I have talked to one pastor 
who has read the book and said he could identify with 
many of the risks about which the authors have written. 

I would not only recommend this book to pastors but 
to lay people as well so they can better understand the full 
scope of what a pastor has to work through in these 
difficult days. Pastors At Risk candidly identifites and 
examines the multi-faceted hazards that have caused 
and multiplied the prevailing crises. 

Reviewed by Roy Snyder 



The Women of Catawba by Hilda Stahl, Thomas Nelson 
Publishers, 1993, 236 pages, $9.99. 

The saying "curl up with a good book" is just what I did 
recently during the "deep freeze" in our area of the 
country with a historical novel, The Women of Catawba, 
written by Hilda Stahl. 

It was in 1800 that a young widow with her baby 
daughter was on her way by ship from Liverpool, England 
to Virginia in America. Her husband had recently died 
and his brother was taking her to his home in Virginia. The 
widow overheard a conversation that her brother-in-law 
was planning to marry her as soon as the ship sailed. 
Being warned by a run-away slave that this was indeed 
the plan and taking the slave with her, she quickly found 
another ship that was going to Charleston, South Carolina 
and sailed on it very frightened that she might be caught 
by her brother-in-law and not knowing what she would do 
when she reached Charleston. She had some very 
interesting experiences on the ship and met new friends 
and through some good and bad experiences ended up 
at Catawba, a plantation in its beginning stages not far 
from Charleston. 

I found the book very interesting with an exciting 
story line concerning life for "the women of Catawba" 
(there were several) on a plantation that was just being 
built. There were problems of pro-slavery and anti-slavery, 
heartaches, frightening experiences, and romance. 
Throughout the book the main characters displayed a 
love for the Lord and a complete dependence on him 
through prayer for guidance in every situation. 

If you want to "curl up with a good book," try this one. 
Reviewed by Lillian Teetor 



February 15, 1994 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



Pastor and Mrs. C. Dean Risser 



Pastor C. Dean Risser was honored by Southvievv GBC, Ashland, Ohio on 
Sunday, December 26th upon his retirement from full time pastoral ministry 
at the conclusion of 1993. 

The Southview GBC presented him with a plaque and his wife, Ella Lee 
with a corsage. By unanimous vote the congregation named him Pastor 
Emeritus of Southview. 

His immediate plans are to help his son-in-law, Pastor Dave Atkins, at 
Lexington GBC in the area of discipleship. Pastor Risser had served previously 
at the Lexington GBC for 12 years. He has 
also pastored churches in Johnson City, 
Tenn.; Margate, Florida; Coraopolis, Pa.; 
as well as in Marion, Ohio for two years, 
and Delaware, Ohio, as Associate Pastor for 
three years He has been at Southview as 
Senior Pastor for two years. 

After a sabbatical from Southview, the 
plans are for him to come back as Associate 
Pastor part time to work with Senior Pastor 
Larry Edwards. 

Pastor Risser and Ella Lee live at 821 
Ohio St., Ashland, Ohio 44805. 





Bruce and Jerry Button, missionaries with the International Ministries to 
Israel in Tucson, keep up an active schedule of outreach in the Jewish 
community. 

In a recent letter to Chuck and Marilyn Winter at Harrah, WA, Jerry writes: 
"We attend Senior Exchange 4 mornings a month, Hadassah 2 days, Great 
Decisions 4 mornings, ZOA once a month, and with other various activities, 
we are hardly ever home. At these meetings are almost completely Jewish 
people and we have excellent times of witness. 

"Itis rumored that the Keren Hadassah (my group of 300) is going to crown 
me Queen Esther in March at the Purim party. If so, it will be a real honor. They 
know I am a pastor's wife and expect me to stand up for what I believe and I 
have worked very hard for Israel so they are happy about that. They are precious 
women and if only they could UNDERSTAND and receive Jesus, how they 
would work for Him! I never realized how much Jewish people just are not 
ABLE to understand. Sometimes I could cry for diem and their inability to see 
through the ' veil' over their eyes and I diink I have no longer taken my salvation 
for granted when I see what God has done for me to let me UNDERSTAND." 

Bruce is 83, and Jerry admits to being 78 years of age. 'They shall bring 
forth fruit in old age; they shall be fat and flourishing" (Psalm 92: 14). 



CORRECTIONS 

FOR THE ANNUAL: 

Add to Michigan listing: 
OZARK (Alan Meyers) 
Grace Brethren Church (41) 
Rt. 1, Box 212, Moran 49760 
(5 'fe miles and 1 mile south of 
Trout Lake on H-40) 
(906)569-3212 
Beth Funderberg 
Rt. 1 , Box 205, Moran 49760 
(906) 569-3202 

Grace Brethren Church 

980 N.W. 180th 

Beaverton, OR 97006 

(503) 645-7471 

Pastor Thomas Rowe's home address is 

3595 S.W. 170th Avenue 

Aloha, OR 97006 

(503) 649-2953 

Grace Community Church 
2800 W. Prospect Road 
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 

Third Brethren Church ( Ralph A. Robinson) 
204 E. Tioga Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19134 

Louis Huesmann (delete L) 
3510 Walnut Avenue 
Long Beach, C A 90807 

Area code for LaMirada, CA is 310 

Wooster Grace Brethren Church 
George Johnson - (216) 263-1177 
Clancy Cruise (not Clancy Cornice) 
Church Phone (216) 264-9459 
Secretary-Mrs. Glenn Moore (216) 264-3470 

Southern Ohio District Conference - change date 
to April 23, location Centerville GBC 

Dr. David R. Plaster 
800 Arbor Lane 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Roy Angle 

103 S. LakeshoreDr. 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Ron and Susan Schemmer 
561 Wisteria Street 
Chula Vista, CA 91911 
(619)421-9057 



CHEIQLD 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



highlights from the 

HERALD NEWSLINE 



Dave Guiles sends a special thanks to all those who 
prayed for and supported Saturation Saturdays in Buenos 
Aires, Argentina. An estimated 14,000 homes were impacted 
each month during the six month literature and evangelism 
blitz. All the participating Brethren churches in Buenos 
Aires report exciting results and measurable growth in 
their ministries. 

James Belton, missionary to Germany, is planning to 
translate old Accent quarterlies for children. He is in need 
of several old quarterlies. The numbers are: 

K1A God Made Families 

P1B God Wants Me to Obey 

P3B God Gives Me Salvation 

P2C Stories from God' s Son 

J1C The Early Life of Jesus 

JH 13 Miracles Science Can't Explain 

JH22 A Walk with Christ Through the Gospels 

JH24 Here's How to Really Live 
Call Oil 49 7702 3693 or you may write him. His 
address is Teresstr 39, 78176 Blumberg, Germany. 

Fifty four Grace Brethren leaders met in Columbus, 
Ohio for an all day meeting on Friday, January 7th, to 
share mutual vision and interaction about the Fellowship. 
Included were representatives from all but three of our 
districts, leaders from all but one of our National 
Organizations, and all the members of the Fellowship 
Council. 

The day began with worship and prayer led by 
Moderator Bob Fetterhoff. Discussion time was given for 
National Organizations to comment on their ministries and 
field questions from the group. The day concluded with a 
time of discussion on FGBC issues and brainstorming. A 
fresh spirit of hope and anticipation was sensed throughout 
the day by those in attendance. Praise the Lord! 

Cambodia Trip "Anywhere we went, we drew crowds 
and had unlimited chances to talk about Jesus," reports 
Tom Lynn, pastor of the River City Grace Community 
Church in Sacramento, California, about his trip to 
Cambodia in October. "We used the Four Laws tracts 
written in Khmer, the main language of the people, so that 
they were reading in Khmer, while we were reading 
English. It was great! We used these tracts to talk to 
anyone, even Buddhist monks inside of their pagodas!" 
"We saw God open doors and hearts for us, " adds 
missionary Clay Hulett. "We were able to hold five days 
of theological training in three cities with 187 leaders from 
40 of the country' s 100 house churches. We were also able 
to visit the two sites where Grace Brethren Churches are 
being built. We met the two men who will be pastoring 
these churches and had a wonderful communion service 



with the Christians in that area." 

The Waldorf, MD Church began with 7 people and 
have had 1,000 members come through their doors. Almost 
half that many have heard, received and witnessed their 
faith through water baptism. Half have moved. The other 
500 are about to embark on more construction, a thousand 
seat auditorium. Cindy Thornley, Pastor Jeffs wife, is now 
directing the school grades pre-K through 6th grade next 
year. The congregation just approved moving ahead to do 
preliminary drawings for a gym and a 3,000 seat auditorium. 
They are also looking into the acreage for sale near the 
Presbyterian church adjacent to them. With 30,000 people 
coming to the area in the next 3 years, they are trying to 
position themselves to grow, build and tell their area about 
Christ. 

The Administration of Grace College & Seminary 
announces the purchase of the Westminster I lotel from the 
Free Methodist Chuch of North America. The final closing 
for the property sale occured on January 15. 

"Our purchase of the Westminister Hotel represents 
the intention of Grace to grow and better serve the housing 
needs of students. The building is of particular significance 
to Grace because former generations of our students were 
housed there," explains Dr. Ronald Manahan, President of 
Grace College & Seminary. "This project is especially 
gratifying since we will also be able to provide space 
within the building for community use. The community 
around Grace has been very good to us and we want to be 
good to them in return. Being able to accomplish all that 
with a structure that is so important to the history of 
Winona Lake is an added benfit." 

The Westminister Hotel, located on 9th Street in Winona 
Lake, will be renovated for use as student housing and to 
accomodate corporate and community events. An Open 
House is planned for Sunday, February 6. 

Dr. Ronald Manahan has announced the receipt of a 
$225,000 gift from the Andersen Foundation ofBayport, 
Minnesota. The foundation, a long-time supporter of Grace 
College, provides support for private accredited institutions 
of higher education which build and operate without 
accepting institutional, federal, state or local government 
finds or loans, including tax funds for faculty or student 
research projects. "The Andersen Foundation continues 
to underscore its leadership in suporting private higher 
education. This sizeable gift is a great assistance in helping 
Grace students meet the cost of education. We appreciate 
the thoughtful organizations and individuals who see the 
value of supporting the education of the next generation of 
leaders, " says Dr. Ronald Manahan, new President of 
Grace Schools. 

Dick Mayhue has reported that his little book, How to 
Study the Bible has been translated and printed in Russian, 
Ukranian, and Romanian for a total of 35,000 copies. Dick 
is former pastor of Long Beach GBC and is currently Dean 
of the Master's Seminary in Sun Valley, California. 



February 15, 1994 



17 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



Highlights from the Herald Newsline 



The Saturation Saturdays evangelistic blitz in Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, ended November 20th. Dave Guiles 
reported the final statistics. Area churches now have 
over 1 00 solid contacts and new believers to follow-up 
on. Thirty-four Bible Institute students worked 29 Sat- 
urdays. 65,000 evangelistic flyers were distributed. 
Nearly 3,000 evangelistic surveys were conducted. 
The Gospel was shared with 1,400 adults. 

Hundreds of children heard the Gospel in Good 
News Clubs. Each participating Brethren Church has 
seen measurable growth. The Jose Marmol Grace 
Brethren Church has doubled in attendance as a result 
of participation in this project. 

Pastor Lee Seese of the Community GBC, Everett, PA, 

announced an upcoming outreach ministry, A Commu- 
nity Christmas. The church invited less fortunate children 
and their families from the area for an afternoon including 
decorating trees, a pizza and turkey dinner, puppet pro- 
gram, games, and a story about the true meaning of 
Christmas. Each child received a Children's Bible, toys and 
clothing. Families were given a bag of groceries and a 
Christmas tract. Nearly $1,000 has been raised for the 
project in cash, gift certificates and donations from the 
church family, local businesses and high schools. It is the 
church's prayer that this December 19 event will meet 
spiritual as well as physical needs. 

Pastor True Hunt went into the presence of the Lord 
on December 10. He died of aortic aneurysm in 
emergency surgery. His life story was in the Brethren 
Missionary Herald in October. 

On December 9-1 1 a summit of denominational lead- 
ers was organized by the movement AD 2000 and 
Beyond at Colorado Springs. This was attended by Bob 




Fetterhoff, Moderator of the Fellowship of Grace Breth- 
ren Churches; Tom Julien, Director of Grace Brethren 
Foreign Missions; Kurt Miller, Director of Church Plant- 
ing for the Home Missions Council; and Ed Trenner, 
Consultant for the National Strategy Committee. This 
movement is seeking to coordinate global efforts to 
reach the world during this final decade of the 20th 
century. Their slogan is "a church for every people and 
the gospel for every person by the year 2000." Special 
attention is given to the peoples of the world who do 
not have access to the gospel, especially to what is 
called the 1 0-40 window of the globe, comprising most 
of the Muslim countries, India and China. 

Pastors, have you discovered how much it means to your 
people when you send a birthday or anniversary card, or 
just a card to tell them you're praying for them? You might 
want to start with Dayspring greeting cards from the 
Herald Bookstore, all at 50% off. Only $2.75 a box! Thaf s 
money well spent. Your people love encouragement. 

Though the temperature lingers around zero degrees 
Farhenheit in Novosibirsk, Russia, Paul Michaels is 

finding hearts warm to the Gospel. Recently Paul 
explained Christianity to 50 parents at a school. The 
administrator was so enthusiastic that he said Paul 
could use the school as he wished. Paul has begun 
saturation evangelism in two areas of Novosibirsk. Two 
men trusted Christ in a recent encounter. 

Make plans now to attend National Conference. Did 

you see the lineup of speakers? There are Knute and 
Jeanne Larson, H. B. London, R. C. Sproul, Jim Custer, 
Dan Allen, Bill Bright, Ed Lewis, to name just a few. 
And the place? Some rooms only $59.50 in Orlando! 
Make your reservations now at 1-800-237-9549, for 
July 23-28, 1994. 




News 
Bearers 



"IF THIS REEFS UP WE'LL HAVE TO FUT ON EJCTRA 
HELP JUST TO PROCESS PAUL'S LETTERS." 



From Biblical Cartoons, Dwight Allen, Jr., cartoonist. 
George W. Knight, compiler. Baker Book House, 1993. 



We now receive over 
50,000 phone calls per year 
at the Brethren Mission- 
ary Herald Company on 
the 800 number (1-800- 
32-32-BMH). This costs over $12,000 per year. Your 
contribution of any amount will help defray costs for 
this service. One hundred percent of your gift will go 
toward maintenance costs. Your name will be listed in 
the Herald magazine after we receive your contribu- 
tion. Send your contribution to Brethren Missionary 
Herald, P.O. Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590. 



18 



HERALD 



The Brethren Adult series for 
March, April and May 

features Faith that Works 




Homer A. Kent, Jr., has for many years 
taught the Epistle of James to 
seminarians and preached on it at Bible 
conferences and in churches. 



This study in the Epistle of 
James has a concise 
commentary on each verse. 
Discussion questions after 
each of the thirteen lessons 
further enhance its usefulness 
for group study. 



$7,95 



(Shipping $2.00 single copy, 
multiple copies— actual shipping costs) 



i*- Free - 



with your Sunday School order- 
two adult study guides 
by Warren Wiersbe! 

(if order total is $100 or more) 



ORDER FORM 

Please send copies of Faith that Works at $7.95 each. 



Q My order totals $100 or more. Please send me the two adult study guides by Warren Wiersbe. 
Ship To: Bill To: 



The Brethren Missionary Herald Co. 

P.O. Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590 • Phone (219) 267-7158 

Toil-Free Number for Orders: 1-800-348-2756 




Friends and Alumni of 
Grace College 

Order a Grace College 
Sweatshirt or Jacket 



Larry Chamberlain 

Secretary & Executive 

Director — Grace Brethren 

Home Missions 



c 







Gladys Deloe 

Wife of Grace Brethren 

Home Missions Director 

of Administration 



Photos by Al Disbi 



A Sweatshirt -$32^5 29.65 
fjffl B Sweatshirt U^9^4f_35 



C Sweatshirt ££S5 23.35 
D Jacket $4^95-^,95 



E Sweatshirt $&rtt 31.45 
F Jacket S4&35 '44.05 



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College Jacket or Sweatshirt 

for Christmas! 



BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

P.O. Box 544 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Address Correction Requested 



Nonprofit Org. 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Winona Lake, IN 
Permit No. 13 



Volume 56, No. 2 



February 15, 1994 
$2.00 



<# 



v earthquakes, and i n 




'fM Jj •••• u3 M33q 



Although I'm 76 years old, God has been 

gracious, and I still enjoy the privilege of 

taking people to visit the land of the Savior. 

Wouldn't you like to join me on one 
of the following trips? 

May 21-June 1 ISRAEL with an 
overnight in Istanbul. 

May 31 -June 12 TURKEY 

including the Seven Churches of Asia, 
Troy, Cappadocia and Istanbul. 

October 3-14 (17) ISRAEL and 
ATHENS with an optional GREEK 
ISLAND CRUISE. 

In addition to traveling with me, my daughter Joan is extending 
my ministry by leading many other groups. Contact her if you 
would prefer a different date. She also has some outstanding 
opportunities available for pastors to earn a free trip. 




For information contact: 



Joan Meyer Keane 

McMurray Travel Service 

787 S. State St., Suite C 

Westerville, Ohio 43081 

1-800-783-2359 



WORTH TAX & 
FINANCIAL SERVICE 

I 3201 E. Center St. • Warsaw, IN 
j^ Professional... but affordable 

• Specializes in tax preparation: ministers 
& payroll reports (by mail or in person) 

• Seminars for ministers & not-for-profit 

Organizations (Attend one by us or sponsor one 
for us) 

• Publishes "Income Tax Law For 
Ministers & Religious Workers" & 
"Professional Tax Record Book" 

(Also church payroll sheets & other business forms) 

• Phone consultation or by appointment 

(Consultation fee based on length of time) 
SEND FOR INFORMATIONAL PACKETS 



Idccxk Tu Guide 

IkwTu Guide 


,,i Minuter i 


Incnne Tit Guide 


VMm 


[ocomc In Guide 


=T=="-~ 


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bcow Tu Guide 


— -■ 


[occch Tu Guide 


wa±= 




« w sr L 



P.O. Box 725, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Telephone: 219-267-4687 

FAX: 219-267-2870 



In the 
center of 
Pennsylvania 
lies Lion 
country 
among the 
beautiful 
mountains 

and farm lands of the area. The 
home of the Penn State Nittany 
Lions is a thriving community 
with all the culture and 
educational advantage of a 
larger metropolitan area. 



Here a 

committed 

core of 

believers seek 

a senior 

pastor with a 

vision to 

reach the 

community and ultimately the 

world. If you would desire to 

learn more about this challenging 

opportunity, contact Jim Morton, 

P.O. Box 498, State College, PA 

16804 (814) 237-9724. 




C HEI^LD 



EDITORIAL 



TWENTY-NINE! 



by Jeff Carroll 



I 



.t was a warm spring night when I first met Tony 
and Debbie Romero. I had recently received Evangelism 
Explosion training and had been certified, so I took my 
team out and went looking for a victim. We decided to go 
visit Tony and Debbie. Debbie had come to our services 
through her best friend, a neighbor, who was a member 
of our church, but Tony had not yet sensed his need. We 
did share the gospel that night, and before we were done 
Debbie embraced Christ as her Savior. Tony told us that 
he'd certainly think over our conversation, but in his 
words, "Sundays are made for softball," so he wouldn't 
be seeing us at church. There was a time when I would 
have launched into a verbal battle, but I guess I've 
learned over time to wait until the Spirit prepares a 

person' s heart. 

Four years went by before I saw Tony again. One 
Sunday morning he and Debbie and their two boys came 
to church. After the service he came up to me and shared 
how much he liked being there. I could sense that the 
Holy Spirit had now prepared his heart. Two days later I 
received a call from Tony's neighbor asking me if I'd 
heard that Tony was in the hospital. As he related the 
story to me, it seems that one of Tony' s sons had come 
home from school with chicken pox and given the disease 
to Tony. Now chicken pox is not very pleasant when 
you're a little boy, but it is survivable. When you're a 
Dad, however, and get it, the consequences can be 
disastrous. The neighbor called once again; Tony was in 
intensive care. 

I knew that I should have gone up to the hospital 
sooner, but somehow the days got away from me. When 



I did arrive at the hospital, I found Tony covered from 
head to toe with chicken pox and in a coma. As a pastor, 
I was so burdened by the turn of events. I felt that the 
Spirit of God was moving in his life and here I was two 
days late. The gospel is only good news if it gets there in 
time. I talked to the nurses and they said to go ahead and 
read to him and pray with him, and that there was a good 
chance that he could hear. So I read and prayed and 
witnessed to Tony that day and two more consecutive 
days. 

On the fourth day I met the nurses and doctor in the 
hallway along with Debbie, Tony's wife. There they 
informed me that they were going to decrease Tony' s 
sedative and try to bring him up out of the coma. Debbie 
and I entered the room, she on one side of the bed and I 
on the other. Tony' s eyes began to flicker and we felt him 
grab each of our hands. He wanted to sit up. He couldn't 

speak because of 
the tubes down his 
nose and throat. In 
the process of 
helping him sit up, 
I said, "Tony, you 
are very, very 
sick. I just want to 
know. Have you 
asked Jesus to 
come into your 
life to be your 
Savior 9 " I will 
never forget 
Tony's response. 
With all of his 
remaining strength, he nodded in the affirmative, that 
indeed he had! 

A few moments later, Tony' s two little boys were 
brought into the room. As I realized later, the purpose was 
to say goodbye to their father. Later that evening I 
received a call informing me that Tony had died at age 29 
of complications from chicken pox. 

February 14th is Valentine's Day, one of my wife's 
favorite holidays. We are always kind and considerate of 
each other on that day. But sometimes, throughout the 
year, there is friction and each time that I am tempted to 
lash out and demand my own selfish agenda, my mind 
drifts back to the little scene at the hospital room. It is there 
that I see what is really important in this life and how short 
that life really is. 

How, then, can I be mad, or hold a grudge, or be short 
with anyone? 




February 15, 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Brethren Missionary 



G HEm iD 

Volume 56 No. 2 ^^ February 1 5. 1 994 





February 15, 1994 

3 Editorial 
Twenty Nine! 

5 Church Focus 
Growing by Discipling 

6 Pastor of the Month 
An Evangelical Voice in the Inner City 

7 Women's Missionary Council 
Missionary of the Year 
Amy Volovski 

8 Interview with Robert Fetterhoff 

9 CE National 
Why Sunday Mornings Are 
Great for Adult Discipleship Groups. . . 

1 Catching Up With . . . Mike Singletary 

1 1 Coach Kessler to Hall of Fame 
Another (Yawn) Exciting 
List of Predictions 

12 Bodily Discipline Profiteth Little 

1 3 New President at Grace Schools 
Scott Puckett Resigns from Grace Village 

14 Taking Issue With MacArthur 

15 Article on Roy Lowrie 

16 Fellowship News 

8 17 Highlights from the Herald Newsline 



Would you have an opinion on anything you would like to share 

with the other readers of this magazine? If so. write to 

Brethren Missionary Herald Magazine 

P.O. Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

(100 words or less) 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Ed Lewis 
Foreign Missions 
Tom Julien 
Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 
Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 
Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 
Nora Macon 
Cover Art by Jim Serra 
Herald News Service: 
1-800-32-32-BMH 
(including Indiana) 

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1-800-348-2756. 8-5, EST. 



C HE^\LD 



CHURCH FOCUS 



Growing 

By 
Discipling 

by John P. Burke, Pastor 

Waterloo, Iowa Grace Brethren Church 



A n exciting formula for reaching 
/^k the world for Christ goes some- 
A^^ thing like this: Set aside all 
JL, JL distractions and devote your- 
self to the singular activity of introducing 
one person to Christ. Then, for the next 
six months, you intensively disciple that 
one individual to a point where he can 
join you in repeating the process, both of 
you, in turn, introduce two more people 
to Christ and pour your lives into them 
for the next six months. The four then 
reach four more. The eight reach eight, 
and so on. 

On paper it looks great. In fact, if 
this same process would be earned out 
to the 32nd generation , or 16 years, the 
entire world could be won to Christ. By 
then you would have made 
4,290,000,000 disciples! 

Thrilling to think about, isn't it? 
But the facts are that this concept breaks 
down in practical experience. You see, 
the formula contains a basic flaw. To be 
sure, the first step is great. My, what a 
joy to introduce someone else to Jesus 
Christ! But the flaw follows. The one 
who wins another person may notpossess 
or utilize the spiritual gifts that are 
necessary to minister to the many , varied 
needs of new believers. Consequendy, 
the process of reproduction breaks down. 

Thankfully, there is a happy solution 
to the problem - the church! According 
to Scripture, God Himself established 
the church (Matthew 16:18). 
Furthermore, the Bible says that He 
designed it in such a way that each local 
church has in operation those gifts of the 
Spirit that minister best to a new 
believer's life (Romans 12; I Corinthians 
12: Ephesians 4). When these gifts are 



exercised, a new believer is established in 
the faith, rooted deeply in Christ, built up, 
and equipped for ministry. In short, the 
local church is God's plan for reaching the 
world. 

Nearly a year ago, the leaders of our 
church met together for a day of prayer and 
planning. We asked ourselves three very 
candid questions: What is the purpose of 
our church? What is the primary goal to 
which our church is committed? What plan 
are we following to reach our goal? We 
were convinced that if we did not understand 
and agree in our answers on these three vital 
issues, for all practical purposes, our church 
growth feet were planted firmly in mid air! 
There was no way we could possibly develop 
a solid, Biblical discipling ministry from 
that position. 

The answer to the first of these 
questions was fairly easy. The primary 
purpose of our church is to glorify God 
(Ephesians 3:14-21). After 52 weeks of 
conducting meetings, spending huge sums 
of money, using facilities, and investing 
countless leadership hours, the bottom line 
question is not, "Did we fill the calendar?" 
or, "Did we have a good attendance?" 
Rather, the bottom line is, "Did it glorify 
God?" 

Likewise, it wasn't all that hard to 
answer question two. We concluded that 
the primary goal of our church was to make 
disciples (Matthew 28:19, 20). Making 
disciples glorifies God. In fact, nothing 
glorifies Him any more than demonstrating 
that a typical church member, under the 
control of the Holy Spirit, can become 
increasingly more Christ-like. 

The answer to question three, however, 



was a litde more difficul t. Yet our leaders 
were convinced that any local church, 
even our church, possesses the resources 
necessary to meet needs. More 
specifically, we concluded that an 
effective discipling emphasis must meet 
two critical needs: 

•Short term follow up to ground new 
believers in Christ. 

• Long term follow up to equip believers 
for ministry. 
At present, our "Growing By 
Discipling" strategy is just getting 
underway. However, we are pleased with 
what we have seen so far. A series of 
Discovery Classes are provided for new 
believers, or for those enjoying a recent 
spiritual awakening. Approximately 8- 
12 people comprise a Discovery Class. 
Generally, the groups meet one hour 
weekly during the Sunday School period. 
Added to the above, a small group 
discipling approach which we call 
"Growth Groups" is also in place. The 
group meeting breaks down into four 
basic parts: Bible discussion, sharing 
time, outreach planning, and prayer. 
Approximately 12-14 people compose 
a Growth Group. They meet weekly in a 
home. 

We've learned so far that before 
you can enjoy a large operation you have 
to be content to start out small. Before 
you build a tower, you have to count the 
cost. Yet we have recognized the 
potential of a solid beginning, even 
though it is small. We're satisfied that 
such tilings will provide the essential 
foundation for a continuing, healthy 
growth pattern during the years ahead. 



America, 
Weep for your Children 



23 Million 

Are 
No More 




ebruary 15, 1994 



PASTOR OF THE MONTH 



An Evangelical Voice 
In The Inner City 



XV, 



ilbert Ray Miller did not come 
to be the pastor of Toledo Grace Brethren 
Church in the usual way. That is - he is 
not the son of a Grace Brethren pastor; 
he did not come to know Christ in his 
youth; and he did not go to seminary. 

Ray, as he prefers to be called, grew 
up in an inner city neighborhood in 
Akron^Ohio. His mother was a devout 
Christian, but his father was not. His 
mother did as every 
Christian mother, 
saw to it that her 
child went to church. 
Therefore, Ray grew 
up in the church, but 
Christ and the church 
did not grow up in 
him. 

When he was 25 
years old, his mother 
suddenly and un- 
expectedly died of 
cancer. His mother 
was very special to 
him. Ray, like so 
many others, was 
driven to seek Christ 
honestly. He knew that his mother was 
going to Heaven and at that time he was 
not. 

Some peers at work introduced him 
to the gospel and the Grace Brethren 
Church. Ray and his wife, his high school 
sweetheart, felt that the Lord had some 
special task for them. However, the 
pastorate was far from their thoughts. 

Desiring to learn all that he could 
about the scriptures, Ray and his family 
regularly attended every Bible study that 
their church, Calvary GBC of Walbridge, 
Ohio, offered. It was not enough. 

Already having a wife and three 
children, it was not feasible for him to go 
away for further training. Oh, but the 




Pastor Wilbert Ray Miller 



Lord answered his prayers! His prayer 
for further training was answered by the 
formation of the Grace Brethren Church 
Theological Practorium. In June of 1985, 
he received his diploma in Theology 
from the Practorium. All of the classroom 
instruction had been completed well over 
a year before. 

His experience of growing up in the 
inner city of Akron, Ohio, had made him 
keenly aware of the 
problems of urban 
life, and he 
desperately wanted 
to reach out. 

Four years 
after his con- 
version, Ray and 
Betty were in- 
troduced to an 
older Christian 
couple who also 
wanted to see an 
evangelical work 
started in the inner 
city. At the time 
this Christian 
couple belonged to 
an Alliance church. 

Believing that this meeting was of 
God, the two couples decided to start a 
Bible study at the home of the older 
couple, Gene and Clemmie Bourn, who 
actually lived in the inner city. On the 
recommendation of Ray's pastor, this 
study was initially taught by Jim Sisi, 
who was pursuing the pastorate. In 1 982, 
Ray, so he thought, was not considering 
the pastorate. He just wanted to be 
instrumental in bringing an evangelical 
church to the African-Americans who 
resided in Toledo. 

About two months after the study 
started, it was without a teacher. It seemed 
as though their infant idea of starting a 



church had been snuffed out. With many 
prayers for direction, Ray became the 
leader of the study. The study had 
overcome its first crisis, only to be faced 
with another one. This time, the home 
itself where the study was being held 
was in question. Therefore, in March of 
1982, Ray moved the study to his own 
home where it continued for the next 
three years. 

A three-fold communion service 
was the turning point for this Bible study 
group. In the late fall of 1984 the group 
members decided to officially seek 
recognition as a Grace Brethren Church. 
By the first of the year the newly formed 
church had been incorporated in the 
state of Ohio. By mid-year they had 
received district and national recognition 
as a Grace Brethren Church operating in 
Toledo. 

In the meantime, their future pas- 
tor was sacrificially preparing for the 
ministry as well as working full-time 
and raising a family. Things were hap- 
pening fast for the newly formed 
church. By the end of January 1985, 
Ray was a licensed pastor of the North 
Central Ohio District and the group was 
in the process of purchasing a church 
building. 

By March of 1985, Toledo Grace 
Brethren Church officially opened its 
doors and has been diligently carrying 
out the task of being an evangelical 
voice in the inner city of Toledo for 
Christ. 

Pastor Wilbert Ray Miller is the 
proud father of three children: Ray 
Maurice, his eldest, recently wedded 
Kimberlie Stovall; Shalon, his eldest 
daughter, is a junior in high school; and 
Felicia is an eighth grader. Betty is his 
wife of twenty some years. God has 
been good! 



c HEr^4ID 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



AMY 
VOLOVSKI 

WMC Missionary of theYeai 



xVrny Bracker was born in Berne, Indiana. When she 
was three years old, her family moved to Wilmore, Kentucky, 
where her father, Gordon Bracker, began his studies to become 
a pastor. Whe she was five, and with her father explaining the 
way, Amy received the Lord Jesus as her Savior. 

The Bracker family moved again when Amy was in 
second grade, this time to Winona Lake, Indiana, where her 
fadier entered Grace Seminary. From then on she was labeled 
a P.K. Her dad pastored in Cleveland, Ohio; Kittanning, 
Pennsylvania; and Fremont, Ohio while she still lived "under 
his roof. " 

As a young person, Amy was very involved in SMM, and 
even served as national Vice President for several years. She 
says that the SMM program made her very aware of our Grace 
Brethren missionaries and where they served. 

Amy attended Grace College, where she received a degree 
in Elementary Education. While there, she began dating Mike 
Volovski, and they were married between her junior and senior 
years of college. (By the time Amy graduated from college, 
there were five children in the Bracker family, the youngest 
one, a girl, being born a few weeks before Amy's college 
graduation. This sister, Rachel Jackson is a missionary in 
Germany. Rachel was a WMC Missionary of the Year a few 
years ago.) 

Amy and Mike have two children. Their son Jon and his 
wife live in Fayetteville, North Carolina, where he is stationed 
with the Air Force. Daughter Rebecca and her husband and 
children live in Altoona, Pennsylvania, where her husband is 
a light and sound technician. The ages of Amy and Mike's 
grandchildren (two girls and a boy) range from three to seven 
years of age. Amy says that one of the hardest things about 
missionary service is having to leave children and grandchildren. 

Amy's hobbies are reading, sewing, and home decorating. 
She especially likes reading historical novels. She makes 
almost all of her own clothes in Africa. She has enjoyed 
decorating their home in each place where they've lived, as 
well as decorating guest houses on Bata station in the C.A.R. 
She says it is a challenge to decorate on a "shoestring," and it 
is very satisfying to see the outcome. Their home at Bata is 
much nicer than they ever dreamed it would be. They have 
running water and an inside bathroom. There are two bedrooms, 
so they use one as a study. They have electricity 2V2 hours each 
night, and for two hours two mornings a week to use their 
washing machines. They have a 12-volt battery system so they 
can still have a light in every room when there is no electricity. 

Bata station (where the missionaries live) is surrounded by 
three villages - one Africian student village and two villages of 
other Africians. There are usually six or seven family units or 




single missionaries living 
on the station. The 
Missionary Children's 
School and the Bible 
Institute and Seminary are 
all located at Bata. 

Amy shared the 
following about why they 
are missionaries today: 

"When our children 
were young we began 
thinking about going to 
Africa as missionaries. I 
should clarify that - it was 
my husband who thought 
about it. I never gave him 

negative feedback, but in my heart I did not really want to go. 
Several circumstances prevented our going at that time but as 
the years went by, my husband would say he would still like to 
go to Africa when our children were raised. Again, in my heart, 
I was hoping it would never happen. 

"However, in the spring of 1983, God changed my heart. 
Mike was teaching full time at a Christian college and I was 
teaching full time at a Christian school. The college was going 
through a leadership change and there were financial problems. 
Mike was told he would have to go on part-time salary. We both 
knew we were going to have to make a change because we were 
barely making it financially on our two full-time salaries. 

"I found myself suggesting [that he] call Grace Brethren 
Foreign Missions to see what needs thay had in the C.A.R. He 
was told that there was an immediate need for a Greek and 
Hebrew teacher in the seminary at Bata. Since those were the 
subjects he had been teaching, we both immediately felt this 
was an indication that God wanted us in Africa. I.ater (after we 
had made our decision to go) we found out there was a need 
for a teacher for the MK's. That doubly confirmed our call 
since I had been an elementary teacher for many years. 

"After studying French for a school year in Albertville, 
France, we were on our way to the C.A.R. to be involved in 
teaching ministries there. Both of us have been teaching there 
since 1984. Our first two years were on a short-term basis under 
the auspices of CE National in the TIME program. We became 
career missionaries under GBFM the summer of 1985." 

Amy teaches grades 1-6 in the Missionary Children's 
School at Bata. She says that is her main area of ministry, and 
is very time consuming. One year she had five different grade 
levels to teach. She also gets involved in other ministries such 
as station hostessing and bookkeeping, teaching African ladies 
to sew, and helping them with reading. 

Amy was asked, "Is there anything else you want to share 
with WMC - or any challenge you want to give?" She replied, 
"From my experience of thinking I could not be happy in 
foreign land and culture, I have learned that if I am where God 
wants me I can be happy. Don't be afraid to say yes to the 
leading of the Lord. He will supply all your needs - even the 
need for happiness." 



February 15, 1994 



NATIONAL CONFERENCE 



INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT D. FETTERHOFF, 

MODERATOR, FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES 



What do you believe to be the spirit 
throughout the FGBC today? 

I believe the prevailing attitude in most of 
our churches is cautious optimism. We 
gained new momentum at our recent 
Conference in Billings, Montana that is 
building. We have spent too long spinning 
our wheels. There is a new desire building 
to move ahead for the glory of Christ and 
His Kingdom. 

For the past ten years, our Fellowship 
has been caught in a theological quagmire. 
We have evaluated and re-evaluated, 
defined and re-defined what we believe. 
Some of that may have been necessary, 
but the prevailing spirit among our people 
is to "get on" with what God has for us. 

Many churches are using creative and 
innovative methods to impact the world 
with the Gospel. I'm meeting pastors who 
have a great vision for what God can do 
with their churches. It's wonderful to talk 
with people who have a sense of excite- 
ment about the future. 

But all of that is flavored with a sense of 
caution because of the struggles we have 
experienced in recent years. I believe 
Satan "has taken advantage of us. 
" We've taken a heavy blow from him... 
because he has caused us to spend 
countless hours focused on issues other 
than how to reach as many people for 
Christ as we can in as many ways as we 
can for as long as we can! Sincere issues 
have been discussed, but Satan has 
laughed all the way to the bank. Many of us 
believe that God is now giving us new life, 
new hope, new enthusiasm, and new vision. 

What do you believe are the critical 
issues facing the FGBC today? 

Several months ago, someone shared 
with me three important questions that we 
need to consider as a Fellowship: 
1) Who are we? 2) How can we pull 
together? 3) Where are we going? 

The first question is being answered 
through FOCUS retreats held across the 
country this year. Leaders of our churches 
are coming together to discuss and review 
our history and heritage. A special moment 



in my life recently occurred when pastors 
gathered at Mohican State Park in Ohio for 
fellowship and encouragement. I encourage 
pastors in other areas of the nation to participate 
in their FOCUS retreats. 

We're discovering the glory of a heritage that 
says we have a commitment to the authority of 
the Scriptures in our lives characterized by 
personal holiness. 

The other two questions relate to our collective 
sense of vision. Proverbs 29:18 says, "Where 
there is no vision, the people cast off restraint." 
I believe our Fellowship has experienced some 
of the internal tensions in recent years because 
no one has clearly articulated where we need 
to go in the future. 

I'm convinced we now have a road map 




Robert D. Fetterhoff 

for the future of our Fellowship. It's called "The 
Masterplan." Somebody has called "The 
Masterplan" the "best kept secret in our 
Fellowship." Thisdocument, which was approved 
at Conference several years ago, gives us a 
clear direction for the future. 

My desire is to pull out of that Masterplan 
specific goals for our Conference in Florida 
which will give our Fellowship a clear vision for 
the future. 

You mentioned the '94 Conference in 
Florida. Tell usabout your desire for that 
Conference. 

I'm asking people across this country to pray 



that God will "ignite new vision" in our 
hearts. I believe the people of the FGBC 
need a new sense of comraderie that will 
cause us to pull together with a new hope 
for what God can do through our efforts. 

I 'm praying that God will enable us to see 
the significant role we can have in the 
Church of Jesus Christ as we approach AD 
2000. Our Fellowship can contribute much 
to the cause of Christ in the coming years, 
but we must focus on the primary tasks 
before us. 

We are planning a Conference that will 
seek to ignite vision in the heart of every 
attender. We've invited speakers like R.C. 
Sproul, Knute Larsen, Jim Custer, Dan 
Allen, H.B. London, Bill Bright, and Ed 
Lewis to challenge our hearts to dream 
new dreams. We'll be hosting musicians 
like Steve Green, Christine Wyrtzen and 
Greg Buchanan, who will lift our hearts to 
worship God in a fresh way. 

My desire is that conference will be a 
source of inspiration, encouragement, and 
exhilaration for people who have come 
seeking a fresh encounter with God. The 
Conference is designed to provide vitality 
for weary pastors, encouragement for 
struggling church leaders, and spiritual 
motivation for everyone. 

I encourage every reader to consider the 
possibility of attending our 1994 National 
Conference at Grenelefe Resort in Orlando, 
FL. Registration information and reservation 
forms are available through your local 
churches. A promotional video is also 
available through our Conference 
Coordinator, Charles Ashman (219-269- 
1269). I'm looking forward to a great time 
with hundreds of Brethren from all across 
the world. 

Bob, how would you encourage 
people in our churches to pray for 
the FGBC? 

Please pray for God's spirit to give us 
new momentum for the future. Pray that 
our hearts will be bonded together, not only 
because of our unique heritage, but also 
because of the wonderful relationships we 
enjoy with each other in Christ. Pray that 
petty divisions will be healed. Pray that a 
new vibrancy spreads across our 
Fellowship like wildfire. Like one writer 
said, pray for a "Fresh wind of the Spirit." 



C HEI^LD 



CE NATIONAL 




Why Sunday Mornings 

are Great Times for Adult 

Discipleship Groups: 



1. The children can be trained at the same time through 
Sunday School. 



It's not another night out. If it's difficult getting people to 
commit to a discipleship group an hour before or after the 
worship service, it's even more difficult to get them to 
commit time outside of "normal" church hours. 



The church is given the opportunity for group discipleship 
of believers, rather than having it happen outside of the 
church. 



It's a simple way to do "shepherding" as the leaders will 
know their discipleship group members' needs. 



5. It's a simple and flexible format (topic, discusion, prayer, 
sharing, coffee). 



It develops a stronger tie between the group and the 
church. People may be more willing to participate in 
church ministries such as choir, VBS, or church visitation. 



Church communication is simplified. Church-family 
news, prayer concerns, projects, or coming events can 
be communicated through discipleship group leaders. 



A discipleship group is the logical "next step" after a 
person attends Sunday morning worship. 



Church Outreach 

Can Be Encouraged By: 

'Showing the Navigator's "Living Proof video series (1-800- 
366-7788). 

• Participating in and praying for the youth evangelistic event, 
"See You at the Party," on March 5. Contact CE National for 
more information. 

• Conducting VBS and camps aimed at non-churched children. 
Consider having camp scholarships to help those who can't 
otherwise attend. 

• Encouraging a prayer group to be praying during invitation 
times. 

• Designating an evangelism Sunday using a name such as 
"Friend Day" and having a special speaker or music. 

• Allowing for 20 minutes of sharing on occasional Sunday 
evenings related to ideas on evangelism. 

• Encouraging the congregation's families to invite non- 
churched families to their home for a Sunday dinner. 

• Using "Target Three" accountability cards. Contact CE 
National to order those cards. 

• Beginning all elders' meetings with sharing about personal 
evangelism opportunities. 

• Having a church musical and "open house." 

• Using Evangelism Explosion training. 

• Conducting community surveys. A survey form is available 
from CE National. 

• Hosting a men's outreach breakfast which will include 
testimonies and fellowship. 

• Organizing a community outreach get-together for Memorial 
Day, Labor Day, or other holiday. 

• Setting outreach goals and budgets. 

• Holding Serendipity Bible studies (which can be used either 
for outreach in special areas of need or general community 
outreach). 



A Different Perspective 

According to World Development Forum, if the world were a town of 1,000 people there would be 564 Asians, 210 
Europeans, 86 Africans, 80 South Americans, and 60 North Americans. It also states that 700 people would be 
illiterate and 500 would be hungry. 

Born Again 

The percentage of American adults who claim to be born again (by region of the country) are: 

South 44% Central 36% Northeast 24% 

Southwest 42% Mountain 34% Pacific 24% 

For more current statistical information please contact: The Barna Research Group, P.O. Box 4152, Glendale, CA 91222. Phone: (818) 241-9684. 

Up and Coming 

March 5 is "See You at the Party." It is an evangelistic event for youth. 

March 6 is National Children's Sunday. It is a day especially designated to honor children and children's ministries. 

Bulletin inserts and information have been sent to each church. 



February 15, 1994 



SPORTS 



CATCHING UP WITH... 



By Tom Felton 

When Mike Singeltary talks... 
people listen. Not because he' s going to 
offer some sage financial advice either- 
al though, as bright as he is, it' s probable 
he could. No, it's simply because he 
shares words worth hearing. One 
important topic he will discuss is the 
value of saving sex for marriage. 

There was a time before he was 
married when he cheated on his wife to- 
be, Kim. Several years later, after truly 
committing his life to Christ, he felt the 
need to tell her what he had done. It was 
an extremely painful but necessary 
revelation for both of them-it hurt and 
humiliated Kim-but the Singletarys 
were able to turn to their single source of 
comfort and strength for restoration and 
healing: Jesus Christ. 

Mike reflects on his years of being 
a star on the field at Baylor, while playing 
the field in his person life: "I thought I 
knew everything. I wish there would 
have been someone in my life, someone 
who cared about me and would have 
pulled me aside and talked to me. Rather 
than saying, 'Mike you're great. Mike 
you're doing good at this.' But no one 
gave me any of the real good stuff that I 
needed for life. What it took was me, 
with a repentant heart, asking the 
forgiveness of a holy God and receiving 
His grace in my life." 

Singletary, with the same controlled 
intensity he possessed as middle 
linebacker for the Bears, believes that 
the Bible is the Word of God. If s in the 
Bestseller-of-all-time that he found truth 
to claim what he perceives as the best 
way to live. 

If s easy to like Mike. But to be like 
Mike means that you can recite Bible 
verses such as 1 Corinthians 12:2, which 
says, "Do not conform any longer to the 
pattern of this world, but be transformed 




by the renewing of your mind." 

Singletary says, "That statement 
cuts against the grain of what's 
happening today. When you look at 
Hollywood and what they're trying to 
sell you, if s a lie. Look at the magazines 
and the newspapers, they're saying that 
' this is the 90s, you got to loosen up. Do 
your own thing. It's all right.'" But 
Singletary wishes someone had told him 
the truth and "saved me a lot of trouble." 
Cutting to the core of the issue, 
Samurai Mike presents the following 
guidelines about finding andmaintaining 
the right view of sex: 

• Wait until you 're married. 'God 
meant for sex to be within marriage. He 
meant for there to be one special night. 
Satan has taken sex and made it 
something cheap. " 

• Instead oj safe sex, save sex. "Even 
if someone says they love you, even if 



VM.W, CI I nag© 

Collegiate numbers: 662 tackles, 351 solos, 

6 fumble recoveries 

Played 12 NFL seasons with the Chicago Bears 

Made 1,488 tackles in 191 games 

Had 20 tackles in one game (Denver Broncos, 

November 18, 1990) 



Awards/Honors: 

• Two-time Ail-American at Baylor University 

• Southwest Conference Player of the Year twice 

• 1990 NFL Man of the Year 

• NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 1 985, 1 988 

• Named to 1 Pro Bowl teams 



you think they mean it — hold on to what 

you have. Hold on to your virginity and 

honor God with it!" 

• If you 're being pressured to have 

sex-resist. "Sex is special. If someone 
says, 'Hey, if you don't do it 
I'm leaving,' let him go. If he 
loves you, he will come back." 

• Choose carefully the 
people you spend time with. 
"First Corinthians 15:33 says, 
' Bad company corrupts good 
character.' Choose your friends 
very carefully . Friends that will 
not lower their standards or 
compromise the Word of God. " 

• Study the Bible to learn 
the truth about sex. "In John 
8:32 it says, 'You will know 
the truth and the truth will set 
you free.' Understand that your 
body is the temple of Jesus 
Christ. Understand that you are 
loved. Understand the price that 
has been paid-Christ's blood 
that has been shed for you." 

These tough yet tender 
words come from one of the 
greatest defenders ever to play 
the game. When Number 50 played, he 
knew die appropriate time to blitz the 
quarterback. But when Mike needed to 
cover a receiver, he strove to mirror die 
opposing player's every move 
gracefully-wi thout laying a hand on him . 
If he blitzed when he was supposed to be 
covering, it could mean a loss for his 
team. 

Singletary knows what it means to 
stay within the game plan. He showed 
restraint by knowing what his linebacker 
position demanded and doing only what 
would best help the team. 

He also knows that the same type of 
restraint is needed in our lives to make 
the right decisions about sex. Singletary 
tells his listeners that if they fail to wait, 
if they don't make the correct choice, 
they have taken something God considers 
beautiful and ruined it by setUing for a 
cheap substitute. 

Mike says, "Sex outside of marriage 
is going to lead you down the wrong 
path." 

Listen. Those are words worth 
hearing and heeding. 

Reprinted by permission of Sports Spectrum 

F« inlomiation on Sports Spectum Magazine cal 1 -800-663-8333 



C HEF^LD 



Coach 
Messier 

to Hall of Fame 



HALL OF FAME — Grace College 
men's basketball head coach Jim Kessler 
has been nominated to the National 
Christian College Athletic Association' s 
Hall of Fame. He will be inducted into 
the hall of fame in March at a ceremony 
in Marion. 

Coach Kessler began coaching at 
Grace College, his alma mater, in 1975 
and has held the position of head coach 



for the past 16 years. His accomp- 
lishments include a career record of 337- 
192, nine Mid-Central Conference Coach 




of the Year honors, nine Mid-Central 
Conference championships, two NAIA 
District 21 championships, four NAIA 
District 21 Coach of the Year honors, 
and the 1992 NAIA Division II National 
Coach of the Year after leading the men 
to a national title. 

Kessler has long been involved with 
and active in the NCCAA. He most 
recently served as the national 
coordinator for basketball during the 
1992-93 season. He was selected for the 
hall of fame based on his outstanding 
leadership and service. 

Coach Kessler and his wife, 
Susanne, live in Winona Lake and are 
the parents of four daughters, Kimberly , 
Sarah, Jennifer and Janelle. 



Coach Jim Kessler 



Another (Yawn) Exciting 
List of Predictions 



John Davis, professor of Old Testament 
at Grace Seminary, is also a columnist 
for his liome town newspaper. He obliged 
us the opportunity to reprint a portion of 
his January 15, 1994 article. 

The landscapes of our land are 
overrun with prophetic pretenders 
making outrageous statements and if the 
record is not set straight, yet more doom 
and despair will cloud the fruited plain. 

I know that my prophecy and 
fulfillment record for the past 13 years 
(0 for 398) has not exactly sparkled with 
untarnished success, but just remember 
there are Chicago Cubs batters getting 
paid big bucks for even worse averages ! 

It was under the light of a full moon 
on the west shore of Big Chapman Lake 
that I penned the following. You will 
immediately sense the profundity of the 
following powerful prognostications. 

1 . The President Clinton economic 
plan will definitely create jobs in 1994. 
Everyone will have to get a second job to 
pay off retroactive taxes. 

2. Ross Perot's political 
organization will dwindle down 



significantly this vear and be renamed, 
"United 1 Stand." 

3. The New York City Marathon 
will have 1 7 false starts this year because 
of gunfire in the streets. 

4. Vice President Al Gore will 
attempt to impress the environmentalist 
crowd by confiscating all the wood bats 
of major league baseball teams, taking 
them out to the forest, and setting them 
free. 

5. President Bill Clinton will 
attempt to destabilize Iran 's economy 
by circulating huge piles of worthless 
money in their country. Recognizing that 
this is no job for amateurs, he will call in 
our nation's experts to oversee the 
project - House Democrats. 

6. Look for judges and the courts to 
get tougher with criminals. They will 
hand out much longer suspended 
sentences. 

7. Federal Courts will tighten up 
on prison release programs. This year 
no felon will be released unless there's 
an emergency or he 's up for reelection. 

8. Salmon Rushdie will appear on 



the television show "This Old House" 
showing different ways to decorate an 
attic. 

Now be honest; areri t you glad you 
read this today? This prose production is 
not just political prattle, but poignantly 
powerful predictions producing 
perspectives of peace and prosperity for 
the new year. 

Eat your heart out, Rush Limbaugh. 




John Davis 



February 15, 1994 



11 



BODILY DISCIPLINE 

Profiteth Nothing 



Fmamarathoner. Well. . . 
that's not the complete truth. 
26.2 miles is a long way to 
run. Actually I'm an ultra- 
marathoner. Dr. Horton, of the 
Physical Education 

Department of Liberty 
University, organizes an 
annual event called "The ^m^mmmm^mm^^^^^m^ 
Mountain Masochist Trail 

Run 50 Miler." It goes over the Blue Ridge Mountains near 
Lynchburg, Virginia. (I'm surprised he hasn't been lynched by 
the unsuspecting runners.) I finished 22nd out of a field of 2 1 7 
starters in 9 hours 4 minutes and 7 seconds. 

So what does one do to top that? How about running 40 
miles on my 40th birthday ? O.K. It took 6 hours 34 minutes and 
25 seconds. Therefore, I wasn't surprised when several friends 
asked me if I was going to run 41 miles on my 41st birthday. 
As January 18th approached, I wondered. 

I also wondered what God really means in I Timothy 4:8. 
The NIV reads, "For physical training is of some value. . ." and 
the KJV translates "profiteth little." Profiteth little!?! Some 
value!?! Running is the solution to all of life's problems! All 
areas of one's life are benefited: physical, emotional, mental, 
social, economical, and even spiritual. Right? But those words 
of God kept pricking my conscience. Is it possible that I've 
overdone it? Are my priorities a bit out of balance? True, it 
takes many hours to train for such events. True, the rewards are 
few and temporal. True, I may extend both the quality and 
quantity of my earthly sojourn. But eventually I will die. 

The verse goes on to say, "... but godliness has value for 
all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life 
to come." The contrast is set. Physical training is good for the 
here and now. But training in godliness is better because it 
benefits the here and now and hereafter. 

So maybe I should find a nice balance between physical 
training and godliness training. After all, I am not just a runner. 
I am also a Christian, a husband of a wonderful wife, father of 
four delightful growing children who won't be children much 
longer, and a pastor of a fine flock of God's people. 

Last night, January 1 8th (my birthday), I lay on my couch 
and tried to relate to couch potatoes as I came to grips with the 
number 4 1 . It was different. I picked up Oswald chambers' My 
Utmost for His Highest and read these words from the January 
1 8th selection, "Beware of anything that competes with loyalty 
to Jesus Christ." Even jogging? Even jogging! A timely 
challenge from a sovereign God. I also picked up my One Year 



Physical training is good for the 

here and now. But training in 

godliness is better because it benefits 

the here and now and hereafter. 



Bible . These are two of my 

1994 spiritual growth goals. 

My 41st birthday came 

and went and I never touched 

my jogging shoes. But I did 

touch some other things on 

that day such as God, my 

children, my wife, and the 

BBBHBHH^HHaHBai lives of wonderful church 

members who phoned to say, 

"Happy Birthday." It was different. I liked it. 

My life is half over. I asked myself, "Do I want to be 
known as one who accomplishes great physical feats, or as one 
who attempts great things for personal godliness and for God?" 
As I strategize for "running" the second half of my life, the 
answer seems clear. Godliness first, jogging second. 




Dan Gillette 



Dan Gillette has pastored the Grace Brethren Church in 
Covington, Virginia for 9 years. He graduated from Grace 
Theological Seminary in 1984 with the Master ofDivinty and 
the Master of Arts in Biblical Counseling degrees. His wife, 
Lois, and children, Jessica, Joanna, Jacinda, and Jordan also 
enjoy an occasional jog and a few 5K races. 



C HEF^LD 



NEWS ITEMS 



NEW PRESIBEN1 

AT 

GRACE SCHOOL! 




The Manahan Family 



The Board of Trustees of Grace College and Seminary 
is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Ronald E. 
Manahan as the fifth President of Grace College and 
Seminary. Rev. Charles Thornton, Chairman of the Board, 
made the announcement to the administration, faculty, staff, 
and students. 

Dr. Manahan has served Grace for 17 years. From 1977 
to 1986 he held the position of Professor of Biblical Studies. 
From 1987 to 1990 he served as Vice president of College 
Academic Affairs, from 1990 to 1993 as Provost, and from 
1993 to the present as Acting President. Dr. Manahan holds 
a Diploma from Grand Rapids School of the Bible and 
Music, a B.A. from Shelton College, and an M.Div., Th.M. 
and Th.D. from Grace Theological Seminary. 

Dr. Manahan brings to the presidency a courageous 
vision for the future of Grace. "I believe that proactive 
leadership is required to transform what is good about Grace 
and make it even better — better for students and better for 
those our graduates will serve. I want Grace to contribute to 
our community and to our world. Accepting this role in the 
education of the next generations of leaders is both humbling 
and invigorating," says Manahan. 

The Presidential Inauguration in honor of Dr. Manahan 
will take place in the early fall. 

Grace College, located in Winona Lake, Indiana, is a 
four year Christian liberal arts college in its 46th year of 
educating men and women for effective lives of character, 
competence, and service. Grace Theological Seminary is in 
its 56th year of developing ministry leaders able to influence 
culture with an integrated biblical world view. 



Scott Puckett 
Resigns From 
Grace Village 



The resignation of Scott Puckett, Grace Village's CEO 
and Health Care Administrator, was announced January 
26th. Scott has accepted the CEO position at Wesley Manor 
Retirement Community in Frankfort, Indiana, and will begin 
that position toward the end of March. 

Scott came to Grace Village in August of 1991 and has 
been used by God to accomplish what seems like a miracle. 
Under his leadership. . . 

• Occupancy has grown from 79% to an amazing 98%! 

• Revenues have increased by $1.5 million. 

• Expenses have decreased by approximately $400,000. 

• In the fiscal year prior to Scott's arrival, Grace Village 
had an operating deficit of $1 million; in this current 
fiscal year they are projecting a surplus of $50,000. 

• Grace Village successfully completed a Chapter 1 1 
reorganization. Legally, Grace Village could have 
walked away from its debt. Instead, Scott and his board 
obeyed biblical mandates and developed a plan to repay 
all debt with a competitive rate of return. They have met 
and exceeded the reorganization requirements and are 
ahead of schedule. 

During Scott's tenure, staff prayer teams were formed 
to pray weekly for health care residents, touching their lives 
both physically and spiritually. Several former residents are 
now in Heaven because a staff prayer team shared the gospel . 
Also encouraging is the recent step of the Retirement 
Community to solicit prayer requests from area churches so 
the residents can serve as prayer warriors. 

The board of directors of Grace Village is moving 
quickly to establish an interim organizational structure while 
the search begins for the best leader to move the Village 
forward into an exciting future. 



QUAKE TOLL 



DEAD: 



51 



INJURED: 



4,500 



HOMELESS: 



15,000 



DAMAGE: 



Up to $30 billion 



UTILITIES: About 8,000 customers without power; 
35,000 without gas; 50,000 without water. 



February 15, 1994 



13 



Taking Issue With 
MacArthur 



Have you read Ashamed of the Gospel 
by Dr. John MacArthur? The following 
is a critique of the book by Dr. Elmer 
Towns. What do you think? Write us at 
the Herald and let us know. 

In this volume, MacArthur attacks the use 
of "user-friendly" strategies advocated by many 
church strategists including George Barna. 
Barna suggests that evangelistic outreach should 
be sensitive to the needs of the unsaved, and he 
provides tools to help church leaders better 
understand unsaved people in order to reach 
them with the gospel. 

The first problem I have with MacArthur' s 
book is that he uses an unusual and questionable 
basis for his attack on Barna. He introduces as 
the basis for his attack an obscure doctrinal 
controversy that erupted in England at the 
beginning of this century called the "Down 
Grade Controversy." 

Since almost no one knows what this 
controversy was, MacArthur tries to describe 
the term "down grade" as drawn from a picture 
of a church traveling up a mountain to reach its 
height, but liberalism has turned the church 
downward, and the church is on the "down 
grade" to destruction. 

One of the principal opponents of the 
down grade movement was Charles Spurgeon, 
pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle in 
London. Spurgeon did all he could to stop the 
down grade, even to the point of risking his own 
ministry. MacArthur sees himself as a Charles 
Spurgeon, although he denies making the 
analogy. MacArthur is risking an attack on 
brothers such as Bill Hybels (unnamed) and 
Barna (specifically targeted) because 
MacArthur feels they have put the church on 
the down grade. 

To make a comparison between Barna 
and the Down Grade Controversy suggests that 
MacArthur doesn't understand the issues. The 
Down Grade Controversy involves an attempt 
to change the content of Christian theology, i.e. 
liberalism. The user-friendly church movement 
is about methodology, not theology. 

The second problem 1 have is the narrow 
basis MacArthur uses to draw his mandate for 
ministry (1 and 2 Timothy). No evangelical 
would ever doubt the model for pastoral ministry 
that's based on Jesus' command to the church 
in the Great Commission. 

In the extensive and exclusive quotations 
of Paul's exhortation to Timothy lies the one- 
sidedness of MacArthur's thesis. MacArthur 
forgets that the purpose of the church is the 
Great Commission — to make disciples of all 
nations (Matthew 28:19). Therefore, the 



church's aim is to reach out to the lost with the 
gospel. MacArthur apparently believes the church's 
aim is a single technique-tough preaching. 

A third weakness of MacArthur' s book lies in 
his incorrect view of the church growth movement. 
He has been quick to criticize this movement, 
implying that its goal is only numerical growth. I'm 
not sure he understands the movement. 

The movement's goal has always been to 
pursue the Great Commission and to help church 
leaders reach the lost in their communities. Within 
the church growth movement there are six church 
worship models, one of which MacArthur has 
perfected: 

The Bible expositional church 
emphasizes Bible teaching, exegesis, andreferences 
to the Greek text. Grace Community Church and 
MacArthur's preaching are excellent examples. 

The evangelistic church could be a Southern 
gospel church or a seeker-driven church, such as 
the one pastored by Hybels, who is sensitive to 
"unchurched Harry." This church is driven by 
outreach and evangelism. 

The renewal church emphasizes excitement 
and revival, in which people sing praise choruses, 
lift hands in worship, and seek God at the altar. 

The body life church emphasizes fellowship, 
koinonia, and relationships, such as the Korean 
model of cell churches. 

The liturgical church emphasizes formal 
worship, dignity, and the reverence of the sanctuary. 

The congregational church is the church of 
the people, such as Brethren, Community, Free, or 
Baptist churches. 

When MacArthur criticizes the user-friendly 
church because it's seeker-driven in outreach, he's 
blind to his own bias and commitment to the Bible 
expositional church. MacArthur should understand 
that a church that worships differently from the 
model he practices is not wrong; it is merely 
different, and the people express their worship 
differently. This represents a difference of 
methodology. Interestingly, the New Testament 
never provides a methodological model for church 
meeting. 

Perhaps MacArthur isn't considering the 
nature of spiritual gifts. While he has the gift of 
teaching, he doesn't recognize that other pastors 
have a different gift mix, hence their ministry is 
expressed differently. Why would he want someone 
with the dominant gift of evangelism to express 
pastoral ministry as he does?Or should the minister 
who has the gift of exhortation become a teacher, 
just because MacArthur ministers from that model 
so successfully? 

A fourth problem appears in the appendix in 
which MacArthur examines Charles Finney and 
the Second Great Awakening. Perhaps because 
MacArthur is a Calvinist, he suggests that Finney 



had an aversion to orthodoxy. Obviously, Finney 
was an Arminian and held to that position. In 
the appendix, MacArthur tries to discredit 
Finney's conversion experience and his 
scholarship, and he explains away the results of 
Finney 's crusades. He accuses Finney of having 
a pragmatic aproach to evangelism. As I 
carefully read MacArthur's attacks on Finney, 
I came to the strong assumption that MacArthur 
hasn't read Finney's Lectures on Revival. 

Finney's key statement was "the right use 
of the appropriate means," a phrase that he 
repeated many times and today is studied by 
scholars who examine revivalism. MacArthur 
wrongly suggests that the phrase means the use 
of gimmicks, advertisements, and other forms 
of outward stimuli to bring about revival. 
MacArthur seems unaware that Finney defined 
the appropiate means as prayer, fasting, 
humility, and the promises of 2 Chronicles 7:14 
that, when properly followed, would bring about 
revival. MacArthur's representation of Finney 
has no basis in historical fact or research. 

Has MacArthur read Barna's books 
carefully? The very thing MacArthur attacks 
(i.e., comprising the message) Barna clearly 
addresses. Barna says we're not to "compromise 
the gospel of the historic faith of the church just 
to make friends" with unsaved people. Barna 
reinforces this message numerous times in his 
books. 

I think MacArthur would agree with Barna 
if he understood the characteristics of a user- 
friendly church, which Barna lists as vision; 
participatory, non-ritualistic prayer; evangelism 
done by the laity and encouraged by the minister; 
dynamic youth programs that adults strongly 
support; and a flexible structure. 

MacArthur has judged a whole movement 
of churches (i.e., the evangelistic church model) 
by the writings of one person (i.e., George 
Barna). Is this not a narrow basis from which to 
write a book? 

I advise MacArthur, "You can't fight 
yesterday's battles to win today's victories and 
live successfully for God tomorow." We must 
learn from the past, but we can' t live in the past. 
The Great Commision is a challenge to the 
church, such a great challenge that it should 
consume all of our energy. We must not waste 
our energies fighting our brothers in Christ but 
must focus our energies on carrying out the 
mandate that has been given to all of us. 

While I appreciate MacArthur's desire to 
seek biblical truth, I believe he has gone too far 
in painting a black or white picture of the 
church growth movement. It's important that 
Christians be aware of both sides of the 
argument. 

Elmer Towns 

Vice Presient, Dean of the School of Religion 

Liberty University 

Lynchburg, VA 

Printed by Permission 



14 



C HEF^LD 



Rojf Lowrie 

dies unexpectedly 



Professor Emeritus Roy Lowriedied 
unexpectedly of an apparent heart attack 
January 29 at his home in South Carolina. 
He was 66. 

Dr. Lowrie was a graduate of 
Philadelphia College of the Bible and 
Wheaton College. He held Master's and 
Doctorate degrees in Education from 
Temple University. 

For 28 years he was the Headmaster 
of the well known Delaware County 



Christian School in Newtown Square, 
Pennsylvania just outside Philadelphia. 
He was also a Christian camp director 
including 2 1 years at Camp Sankanac. 

As Executive Director of the 
National Association of Christian 
Schools, Dr. Lowrie was one of the 
leaders in the merger that created the 
Association of Christian Schools 
International (ACSI). After that merger 
he was named the President of ACSI. 

Dr. Lowrie was the Director of die 
National Institute of Christian School 
Administration from 1971 to 1993, and 
Director of Grace Seminary's MA. 
Program in Christian School 
Administration from 1986 until 1993. In 
1994 that program was relocated to 



Columbia Bible College, Columbia, 
South Carolina. 

On behalf of Christian school 
ministries, Dr. Lowrie traveled 
extensively in the United States as well 
as the Dominican Republic, Bahamas, 
Japan, Korea, Okinawa, Hong Kong, 
and the Philippines. 

He was an author, conference 
speaker, and the producer and host of a 
radio program heard on several Christian 
stations. 

A memorial service honoring Dr. 
Lowrie was held at Delaware County 
Christian School Saturday, February 5. 

Dr. Lowrie is survived by his wife 
Margaret "Peg", four daughters, and one 
son. 



~£>pfik^evhivs 



Pastors At Risk, by H.B. London, Jr. and Neil B. 
Wiseman, Victor Books, 1993, 240 pages, $14.99. 

Two pastors (London and Wiseman) with over fifty 
years of experience in the pastorate have written this 
book because they have found so many of their colleagues 
in distress. The book is divided into three parts: 1. 
Comprehending the Risks, 2. Surviving the Storm, and 3. 
Renewing the Pastor. Three things stand out early in the 
book also. Balance between ministry and the family is 
often difficult to maintain. "Burnout" is sometimes 
experienced when pastors forget the purpose of their 
ministry. Budgeting of time and money becomes a problem 
as well. In each chapter there are risk factors noted and 
at the close of each chapter are the contemporary 
challenges. The last chapter of the book is the most 
comprehensive as the authors talk about the twelve 
steps to overcoming the risks. I have talked to one pastor 
who has read the book and said he could identify with 
many of the risks about which the authors have written. 

I would not only recommend this book to pastors but 
to lay people as well so they can better understand the full 
scope of what a pastor has to work through in these 
difficult days. Pastors At Risk candidly identifites and 
examines the multi-faceted hazards that have caused 
and multiplied the prevailing crises. 

Reviewed by Roy Snyder 



The Women of Catawba by Hilda Stahl, Thomas Nelson 
Publishers, 1993, 236 pages, $9.99. 

The saying "curl up with a good book" is just what I did 
recently during the "deep freeze" in our area of the 
country with a historical novel, The Women of Catawba, 
written by Hilda Stahl. 

It was in 1800 that a young widow with her baby 
daughter was on her way by ship from Liverpool, England 
to Virginia in America. Her husband had recently died 
and his brother was taking her to his home in Virginia. The 
widow overheard a conversation that her brother-in-law 
was planning to marry her as soon as the ship sailed. 
Being warned by a run-away slave that this was indeed 
the plan and taking the slave with her, she quickly found 
another ship that was going to Charleston, South Carolina 
and sailed on it very frightened that she might be caught 
by her brother-in-law and not knowing what she would do 
when she reached Charleston. She had some very 
interesting experiences on the ship and met new friends 
and through some good and bad experiences ended up 
at Catawba, a plantation in its beginning stages not far 
from Charleston. 

I found the book very interesting with an exciting 
story line concerning life for "the women of Catawba" 
(there were several) on a plantation that was just being 
built. There were problems of pro-slavery and anti-slavery, 
heartaches, frightening experiences, and romance. 
Throughout the book the main characters displayed a 
love for the Lord and a complete dependence on him 
through prayer for guidance in every situation. 

If you want to "curl up with a good book," try this one. 

Reviewed by Lillian Teetor 



February 15, 1994 



15 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



l 



Pastor C. Dean Risser was honored by South view GBC, Ashland, Ohio on 
Sunday, December 26th upon his retirement from full time pastoral ministry 
at the conclusion of 1993. 

The Southview GBC presented him with a plaque and his wife, Ella Lee 
with a corsage. By unanimous vote the congregation named him Pastor 
Emeritus of Southview. 

His immediate plans are to help his son-in-law, Pastor Dave Atkins, at 
Lexington GBC in the area of discipleship. Pastor Risser had served previously 
at the Lexington GBC for 12 years. He has 
also pastored churches in Johnson City, 
Tenn.; Margate, Florida; Coraopolis, Pa.; 
as well as in Marion, Ohio for two years, 
and Delaware, Ohio, as Associate Pastor for 
three years. He has been at Southview as 
Senior Pastor for two years. 

After a sabbatical from Southview, the 
plans are for him to come back as Associate 
Pastor part time to work with Senior Pastor 
Larry Edwards. 

Pastor Risser and Ella Lee live at 821 
Ohio St., Ashland, Ohio +4805. 





Bruce and Jerry Button, missionaries with the International Ministries to 
Israel in Tucson, keep up an active schedule of outreach in the Jewish 
community. 

In a recent letter to Chuck and Marilyn Winter at Harrah, WA, Jerry writes: 
"We attend Senior Exchange 4 mornings a month, Hadassah 2 days, Great 
Decisions 4 mornings, ZOA once a month, and with other various activities, 
we are hardly ever home. At these meetings are almost completely Jewish 
people and we have excellent times of witness. 

"It is rumored that the Keren Hadassah (my group of 300) is going to crown 
me Queen Esther in March at the Purim party. If so, it will be a real honor. They 
know I am a pastor's wife and expect me to stand up for what I believe and I 
have worked very hard for Israel so they are happy about that. They are precious 
women and if only they could UNDERSTAND and receive Jesus, how they 
would work for Him! I never realized how much Jewish people just are not 
ABLE to understand. Sometimes I could cry for them and their inability to see 
through the ' veil' over their eyes and I think I have no longer taken my salvation 
for granted when I see what God has done for me to let me UNDERSTAND." 

Bruce is 83, and Jerry admits to being 78 years of age. 'They shall bring 
forth fruit in old age; they shall be fat and flourishing" (Psalm 92: 14). 



CORRECTIONS 

FOR THE ANNUAL: 

Add to Michigan listing: 
OZARK (Alan Meyers) 
Grace Brethren Church (41) 
Rt. 1, Box 212, Moran 49760 
(5 ] k miles and 1 mile south of 
Trout Lake on H-40) 
(906)569-3212 
Beth Funderberg 
Rt. 1 , Box 205, Moran 49760 
(906) 569-3202 

Grace Brethren Church 

980 N.W. 180th 

Beaverton, OR 97006 

(503) 645-7471 

Pastor Thomas Rowe's home address is 

3595 S.W. 170th Avenue 

Aloha, OR 97006 

(503) 649-2953 

Grace Community Church 
2800 W. Prospect Road 
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 

Third Brethren Church ( Ralph A. Robinson) 
204 E. Tioga Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19134 

Louis Huesmann (delete L) 
3510 Walnut Avenue 
Long Beach, C A 90807 

Area code tor LaMirada, CA is 310 

Wooster Grace Brethren Church 
George Johnson - (216) 263-1177 
Clancy Cruise (not Clancy Cornice) 
Church Phone (216) 264-9459 
Secretary-Mrs. Glenn Moore (216) 264-3470 

Southern Ohio District Conference - change date 
to April 23, location Centerville GBC 

Dr. David R. Plaster 
800 Arbor Lane 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Roy Angle 

103S. LakeshoreDr. 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Ron and Susan Schemmer 
561 Wisteria Street 
Chula Vista, CA 91911 
(619)421-9057 



C HEI^ID 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



highlights from the 

HERALD NEWSLINE 



Dave Guiles sends a special thanks to all those who 
prayed for and supported Saturation Saturdays in Buenos 
Aires, Argentina. An estimated 1 4,000 homes were impacted 
each month during the six month literature and evangelism 
blitz. All the participating Brethren churches in Buenos 
Aires report exciting results and measurable growth in 
their ministries. 

James Belton, missionary to Germany, is planning to 
translate old Accent quarterlies for children. He is in need 
of several old quarterlies. The numbers are: 

K 1 A God Made Families 

P1B God Wants Me to Obey 

P3B God Gives Me Salvation 

P2C Stories from God' s Son 

J1C The Early Life of Jesus 

JH 13 Miracles Science Can't Explain 

JH22 A Walk with Christ Through the Gospels 

JH24 Here's How to Really Live 
Call Oil 49 7702 3693 or you may write him. His 
address is Teresstr 39, 78176 Blumberg, Germany. 

Fifty four Grace Brethren leaders met in Columbus, 
Ohio for an all day meeting on Friday, January 7th, to 
share mutual vision and interaction about the Fellowship. 
Included were representatives from all but three of our 
districts, leaders from all but one of our National 
Organizations, and all the members of the Fellowship 
Council. 

The day began with worship and prayer led by 
Moderator Bob Fetterhoff. Discussion time was given for 
National Organizations to comment on their ministries and 
field questions from the group. The day concluded with a 
time of discussion on FGBC issues and brainstorming. A 
fresh spirit of hope and anticipation was sensed throughout 
the day by those in attendance. Praise the Lord! 

Cambodia Trip "Anywhere we went, we drew crowds 
and had unlimited chances to talk about Jesus," reports 
Tom Lynn, pastor of the River City Grace Community 
Church in Sacramento, California, about his trip to 
Cambodia in October. "We used the Four Laws tracts 
written in Khmer, the main language of the people, so that 
they were reading in Khmer, while we were reading 
English. It was great! We used these tracts to talk to 
anyone, even Buddhist monks inside of their pagodas!" 
"We saw God open doors and hearts for us, " adds 
missionary Clay Hulett. "We were able to hold five days 
of theological training in three cities with 187 leaders from 
40 of the country' s 100 house churches. We were also able 
to visit the two sites where Grace Brethren Churches are 
being built. We met the two men who will be pastoring 
these churches and had a wonderful communion service 



with the Christians in that area." 

The Waldorf, MD Church began with 7 people and 
have had 1,000 members come through their doors. Almost 
half that many have heard, received and witnessed their 
faith through water baptism. Half have moved. The other 
500 are about to embark on more construction, a thousand 
seat auditorium. Cindy Thornley, Pastor Jeff s wife, is now 
directing the school grades pre-K through 6th grade next 
year. The congregation just approved moving ahead to do 
preliminary drawings for a gymanda3,000 seat auditorium. 
They are also looking into the acreage for sale near the 
Presbyterian church adjacent to them. With 30,000 people 
coming to the area in the next 3 years, they are trying to 
position themselves to grow, build and tell their area about 
Christ. 

The Administration of Grace College & Seminary 
announces the purchase of the Westminster I lotel from the 
Free Methodist Chuch of North America. The final closing 
for the property sale occured on January 15. 

"Our purchase of the Westminister Hotel represents 
the intention of Grace to grow and better serve the housing 
needs of students. The building is of particular significance 
to Grace because former generations of our students were 
housed there," explains Dr. Ronald Manahan, President of 
Grace College & Seminary. "This project is especially 
gratifying since we will also be able to provide space 
within the building for community use. The community 
around Grace has been very good to us and we want to be 
good to them in return. Being able to accomplish all that 
with a structure that is so important to the history of 
Winona Lake is an added benfit." 

The Westminister Hotel, located on 9th Street in Winona 
Lake, will be renovated for use as student housing and to 
accomodate corporate and community events. An Open 
House is planned for Sunday, February 6. 

Dr. Ronald Manahan has announced the receipt of a 
$225,000 gift from the Andersen Foundation of Bay port, 
Minnesota. The foundation, a long-time supporter of Grace 
College, provides support for private accredited institutions 
of higher education which build and operate without 
accepting institutional, federal, state or local government 
funds or loans, including tax funds for faculty or student 
research projects. "The Andersen Foundation continues 
to underscore its leadership in suporting private higher 
education. This sizeable gift is a great assistance in helping 
Grace students meet the cost of education. We appreciate 
the thoughtfiil organizations and individuals who see the 
value of supporting the education of the next generation of 
leaders, " says Dr. Ronald Manahan, new President of 
Grace Schools. 

Dick Mayhue has reported that his little book, How to 
Study the Bible has been translated and printed in Russian, 
Ukranian, and Romanian for a total of 35,000 copies. Dick 
is former pastor of Long Beach GBC and is currently Dean 
of the Master' s Seminary in Sun Valley, California. 



February 15, 1994 



17 



EARTHQUAKE 



This report just in from Simi Valley, 
California, a town of about 100,000, 15 miles 
NWof Northridge (the Epicenter). 

According to Pastor John Mcintosh, the 
church received no structural damage - the 
offices, classrooms and libraries are in a 
shambles as everything on the walls and 
shelves is now on the floor. 

As far as he knows, no one in the church 
was injured. However, many church families 
received major damage to their homes. Those 
who have no damage are calling in to help 
those who have. Electricity and water were off 
yesterday, but have been restored today. 

Grocery stores and service stations have 
long lines. The stores allow only a few people 
in at a time due to heavy vandalism. 




Photos by Dominic Tondino, Simi Valley, CA 







m& 




wfam mzs. 




BWfr»S;^~"^^X 




^^^ 


ft 1 





The world's deadliest 

QUAKES 

The top 10 major quakes in the world since the first 
was recorded in 526: 



Date 


Location 


Deaths 


Jan. 24, 1556 


Shaanxi, China 


830,000 


Oct. 11, 1737 


Calcutta, India 


300,000 


May 20, 526 


Antioch, Syria 


250,000 


July 2, 1976 


Tangshan, China 


242,000 


Sept. 1,1923 


Yokohama, Japan 


200,000 


May 22, 1927 


Nan-Shun, China 


200,000 


Dec 30, 1730 


Hokkaido, Japan 


137,000 


Dec. 16, 1920 


Gansu, China 


100,000 


Sept. 27, 1290 


Chihli, China 


100,000 


Dec. 28, 1908 


Messina, Italy 


83,000 



USA's worst: 

April 18, 1906 San Francisco 

Source: The 1993 World Almanac and Book of Facts 



503 



C HEI^LD 



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James has a concise 
commentary on each verse. 
Discussion questions after 
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for group study. 



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c HEf^LD 



EDITORIAL 



Tie Secret 



By Jeff Carroll 



I'll never forget the joy that I felt as a 
young pyromaniac when I discovered 
the powers of a magnifying glass in direct 
sunlight. I started with gum wrappers and quickly 
moved through every conceivable combustible 
material in our back yard. It almost seemed 
magical how you could cast sunlight through the 
glass and as you moved it around, begin to see 
smoke and then fire. In all of my "experiments" I 
quickly found out that rapid combustion only 
occured at one point: when the magnifying glass 
was focused on the object of incineration. 
Focusing the glass was the sure fire method. If 
the glass was not focused, there would be no fire 
- as simple as that. 

Think with me about our Fellowship. If we 
were a business, what would our core product 
be? Before we come up with a list of several 
answers, remember to have more than one runs 
the risk of leaving us unfocused. Perhaps we 
have forgotten what our product is. We are a 
fellowship of churches. So it follows that our 
primary product is the planting of new churches. 
After all, each of our local churches began 
because someone cared enough to see the need 
of a new Grace Brethren Church. Think of it: Alva 
J. McClain heard Louis S. Bauman in 1912 
preach on prophecy at Sunnyside Brethren 
Church. Later that evening, Alva McClain walked 
the aisle and gave his life to Christ. Now, look 
down the pike and see all the by-products of that 
local church's ministry, that week of meetings! 

Focusing on our core "business" is the key. 
Let me suggest that we, as a fellowship, focus on 
one and only one thing: church planting. This 
method of evangelism must become our passion 
if we are to thrive. I heard of a seminary in India 
where you do not graduate until you have planted 



a church. Now, 

that's focus. 

Brethren, let's stop 

talking and as the 

NIKE slogan puts it: 

JUST DO IT! We 

must do it on the 

National level as 

well as the local 

church level. Our 

seminary must 

capture this passion 

as well as every person in our church. We exist 

to start new churches! No other reason! Every 

dollar spent must be evaluated on this basis. We 

at the Herald want to be the cheerleaders for 

those who will go do it! May this tribe increase! 




So you have a minute to spend? 

Well here's what a minute will buy- 

A word to let someone know you care, 

A smile to a passerby, 

A bit of communion with God and His Word 

A "(hank you" dial's maybe long due, 

A deep look inward to change your sights 

And broaden your point of view. 

If you have all of a minute to spend, 

How very blest you are! 

For a minute will buy a sincere cry in prayer, 

And bring Gods answer from afar. 






March 15, 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Brethren Missionary 




Volume 56 No. 3 




' A 






March 15, 1994 



3 Editorial 
The Secret 

5 Church Focus 

Greatland Grace Brethren Get 
Serious About Prayer 

6 CE National 

Ideas and Information 

7 Interview with Knute Larson 

9 CE National 

Why Brethren National Youth 
Conference Is For Your Youth 

13 Women's Missionary Council 
Missionary of the Year 
Kristen Kirnbauer 

14 CE National 
Operation Restore Iowa 

16 Sports 

The Motivators 

17 Home Missions 

A Soldier Goes Home. . . 
His Work Lives On 

18 Herald Newsline/ Fellowship News 

19 Grace Village 

Are You Brightening Someone's Day? 



Would you have an opinion on anything you would like to share 

with the other readers of this magazine? If so, write to 

Brethren Missionary Herald Magazine 

P.O. Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

(100 words or less) 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Ed Lewis 
Foreign Missions 

Tom Julien 

Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 

Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 

Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 

Nora Macon 

Herald News Service: 
1 -800-3 2-32-BMH 
(including Indiana) 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is a publication of the Fellowship 
of Grace Brethren Churches, published monthly by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., P.O. Box 5-14, 1104 Kings Highway, 
Winona Lake, IN 46590. Telephone (219) 267-7158 

FAX Number: 219-267-4745 

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News and Advertising Policy 

The Herald magazine offers space for promotional material to the 
boards, churches and members of the NFGBC This includes 
publicizing special events, seminars, programs, or advertising for 
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C HEKAW 



CHURCH FOCUS 



Greatland Grace Brethren 



Abont Prayer! 



In the fall of 1987, Anchorage Grace 
Brethren Church had a vision of 
starting a sister church on the other 
side of town. Pastor E. John Gillis was 
asked by the Anchorage Grace elders 
to pioneer this work. A core group of 
thirteen believers (one couple from 
Eagle River Grace Brethren and the 
rest from Anchorage Grace Brethren) 
joined Pastor Gillis in the work. A TV 




studio was rented, and the first service 
was held on the Sunday before 
Thanksgiving, followed by a 
Thanksgiving poduck ( now an annual 
event). 

As the church grew, a real family 
spirit developed, and to this day 
continues to be a very cohesive force 
in the congregation. After a year or so, 
the Alaska "oil spill" happened, and 
due to some unfortunate (for us) events 
caused by it, we had to move. The 
Lord provided another building to rent 
across the street and down a block. 
We were located between another 
church and a funeral home, and to top 
it off, we had a very steep flight of 
stairs to climb to reach the sanctuary. 
This presented a real problem to some 
of our older members, and also to 
some younger ones who were on 
crutches due to skiing accidents, etc. 



The church continued 
meeting on this upper level for 
approximately four years. We 
grew, but not as fast as we 
would have liked. In August 
of 1993 the congregation 
decided that if we were ever to 
have our own building, we had 
better start doing some serious 
praying. Now, it's not as 
though we hadn' t been praying 
all along, but we felt that God 
wanted us to be specific, so we 
decided to stay after the evening 
service for what we called "Stay and 
Pray", a concentrated effort on the 
part of the congregation to beseech 
our Lord for His will in our midst 
concerning a more suitable meeting 
place. 

Before a month had passed, a 
realtor who attends Anchorage Grace 
was approached about our need by 
Pastor John Gillis at the Monday night 
church bowling league. She replied 
that there was a church building 
belonging to the Assemblies of God 
Foundation that might be suitable, and 
that it would be for sale soon. Two 
days later (Wednesday) we looked at 
the building, and became so excited 
that we took the entire congregation 
over to see it during prayer meeting 
that evening. After everyone had 
toured the facilities and gathered in 
the sanctuary, an impromptu business 
meeting was held, and the 
congregation enthusiastically voted, 
"YES, YES, YES! Let's buy it!" 

The details were all quickly 
worked out, and with the help of the 
Grace Brethren Investment 
Foundation, we were able to move in 
on the first Sunday in October, 1993. 
The facilities came with all the 
furniture, pews, piano, organ, sound 
system, telephone system, 
kitchen, and fenced 
playground for children. We 
spent a month painting, 
wallpapering, and getting the 
building ready for our 
dedication service, which was 
held on the first Sunday in 
November. The pictures you 
see were taken on that day. 

Since moving into our 
new building, we have seen 
growth in many ways. New 




folks from the community are coming, 
several babies are on the way, and 
we've seen quite a few decisions for 
salvation, followed by baptism. A new 
excitement is in the air! We have two 
adult Sunday School classes, one 
taught by Pastor Gillis for new 
believers, and another currently 
studying the Book of Joshua, taught 
by Associate Pastor Lou Amundson, 
who also is our worship leader and 
leader of the Pioneer Clubs for 
children. Wednesday night is Family 
Night, with an adult Bible study 
upstairs and the children downstairs. 
Sunday evenings during the preaching 
time there is also practice time for a 
singing group called "Young 
Inspiration" led by our pianist, 
Margaret Kirkland. The kids range in 
age from 3 years to 6th grade. 
The believers who make up the 
congregation of Greatland Grace 
Brethren Church are excited about 
what the Lord is doing in our midst It 
was clearly a direct answer to prayer 
that we are in our new building, and 
God has been blessing us abundantly 
every week. We are loking forward to 
the time when we outgrow our present 
facilities and will have to start another 
"Stay and Pray" effort for an even 
larger building! 




March 15, 1994 



CE NATIONAL 



National Day of Prayer 

Thursday, May 5, is our country's National Day of 
Prayer. It's a wonderful day to pray for the lost, your church, 
our FGBC ministries and personal needs. 

Neighborhood Bible Clubs 

Neighborhood Bible Clubs (NBC's) are great! NBC's 
are a type of backyard, five-day children's club that are 
more effective than many traditional VBS programs. NBC's 
come with music cassette tapes, props and notebook 
materials which can be duplicated. NBC's don't require 
advanced training classes and are low cost, simple, effective 
and flexible. They reach non-churched children and are 
programmed for 75 minutes. For more information, contact 
the Worthington GBC. 



Ideas for YOUR Church: 

1. Conduct a prayer meeting before Sunday morning 
church where church leaders pray with the pastor, 
dedicating him and the message to the Lord. 

2. Tom Julien recently challenged all Focus Retreat 
attenders to end each conversation with prayer. What a 
difference it made in attitudes and perspective! Try it at 
church. 

3. Give a break to Sunday School teachers (ideally in 
the summer or around Christmas) by providing a two to four 
week video series for the entire family in place of the normal 
Sunday School classes and ABF's. Contact CE National for 
their video loan catalogue. 

4. Use married couples to teach children's or adult's 
classes. Using couples encourages them to study the Bible 
together and also promotes informality and interaction in 
the classroom. 



Youth Ministry Ideas: 

Develop and promote a Bible quiz team to 

encourage your youth to memorize Scripture. 
Contact CE National for more information. 

Prepare your youth group for college by 

leading a series on living with roommates, 
budgeting, finding the right friends, church 
involvement, para-church organizations on a 
secular campus, study habits, accountability, 
devotions and other college-related topics. 

Encourage youth leadership by using 
youth to lead their youth meetings. Let them 
introduce games, pray, read Scripture, lead or 
help with music or give testimonies and 
interviews. The more they grow spiritually, the 
more they need to lead. 

Sponsor a "Girls Only" meeting at least 
once every two months with topics such as 
dating, ministry as a girl, missions, etc. Contact 
Chery Otermat at CE National for more topics 
and ideas. A parallel "Guys Only" meeting 
can be sponsored too. 

Get excited about Brethren National 
Youth Conference! It's motivating, provides 
quality teaching and training, is a lot of fun and 
is well worth the investment. Contact CE 
National for more information. 




Senior Statistics 



- Since 1 985 there have been more Americans over age 65 than under age 18. 

- There are more Americans over age 65 than the entire population of Canada. 

- There are approximately 40,000 Americans over 100 years old. 

- Over one-fourth of all men over age 55 and one half of men over age 62 are retired. 

- The vast majority of retirees do not move when they retire. 

- Over 60% of all single adults are older people. 

- By 2040, the average life expectancy for men will be 87 years and 92 years for women. 



C HE^LD 



INTERVIEW 



INTERVIEW WITH 



Knute Larson 



K„ 



^nute Larson is the pastor of 
The Chapel, Akron, Ohio. The 
Chapel averages about 6000 people 
in attendance on a Sunday morning. 
Probably 9000 people claim the 
church as "their church." There 
are four Morning Worship 
services, and approximately 38 
adult Bible fellowships which are 
organized for care, outreach and 
growth of the attenders. In addition 
to this, there is a Sunday evening 
service and over 200 home groups 
or small groups. 

"Knute, we're really 
interested in what God has 
been doing in your ministry 
since you arrived at The 
Chapel over ten years ago. 
Has it been ten years?" 

"Well, one of the challenges 
was to become a leader of people 
who didn't know me very well and 
to learn to love and pastor and 
serve people whom I didn't know 
very well. I think it was because so 
many people prayed, both in 
Ashland and Akron, that it was a 
very good beginning. They 
received me well, and I turned my 
heart toward them, and that was a 
wonderful beginning. 

The challenge was following 
a long-term pastor who had done a 
wonderful job. Pastoring a church 
that was grieving because he left 
was handled with prayer which 
resulted in very good transitions 
for which I am very grateful. 

Related to that, every church 
has to learn to focus on Christ, a 



very difficult focus because He's 
invisible. That was one of the 
challenges in my life, too. The 
strength of the church then and 
now, is that it doen focus on 
Christ. It has continued to work at 
how to worship as a group and 
individually. 

Another challenge is how to 
adapt to the culture and how this 
church should change. Indeed, any 
growing or successful church must 
be changing constantly in its 
methods. One of my challenges as 
one of the leaders was 'Where do 
we go from here?' 

One of the things we 
needed to do was provide 
community and congrega- 
tional life in addition to the 
wonderful morning worship 
services. That has come and 
now there are support groups 
for all kinds of needs, as well 
as medium-size adult Bible 
fellowships and small 
groups. That has been a 
growing strength of the 
church the last ten years. 

I felt, too, that the church 
must consider the fine line of 
involvement with the 
community without be- 
coming political or taking sides on 
issues that are not clearly moral or 
spiritual . We have tried to do that. " 

"We've asked you to speak 
at Conference on 'A Vision 
for the Church in a Changing 
Culture.' Would you describe 
for us the changes you 



observe in our culture that 
would concern or even alarm 
you?" 

'There are many books written 
today about the changing culture, 
most of which say that evangelical 
theology is dying, or dead, and that 
we have traded everything for a 
bowl of oatmeal. In part, that's 
true. But in part, it is false. I want to 
speak to both those issues. Clearly 
the issue of watering down 
theology, or no longer portraying 
God as a God of holiness and 
judgement, as well as a God of 
love, has taken over many policy 
books in churches or in personal 
hearts. But many people have 
stayed with good theology and not 
changed that. The second major 
area of change in the country has 




Knute Larson 

been in how people perceive the 
church or respond to our message 
That part of culture we must study 
and recognize and adapt to or we ' re 
dead ducks. 

We must not change our 
theology, but change our methods. 
People do not respond to messages 
or signals that used to entice them, 



March 15, 1994 



INTERVIEW 



partly because of their exposure in 
the media to so many ways of the 
church and so many spectacular 
events and programs. 

For instance, it used to be a big 
thing that we could say we have 
answers to life. Now they've heard 
that so many times that they don't 
believe it. Many people have tried 
just about everything, including 
church, and given up on it. I think, 
too, the things that interest us at 
church do not interest the secular 
man - how to learn to pray or to 
have a warm Sunday evening 
service, or that we have drama in 
our worship. They've seen all the 
drama they want on TV and are not 
moved by any of that. 

One of the wonderful 
awakenings that is happening in 
churches is that we realize that our 
best advertisement is still the 
individual Christian who through 
his contacts shows the life of 
integrity and fulfillment and is the 
bridge to another life. I think being 
forced back to that is one of the 
best things that could ever happen 
to the church. 

Nobody argues that having an 
evangelistic service - unless you 
have Billy Graham as a speaker - is 
not going to bring in people to hear 
the Word of God, as was once true 
in New England and once in 
Wooster when I lived there. So the 
church must walk the delicate line 
and learn to adapt to its culture in 
method but keep its message 
straight. To do that, we must learn 
what is our message. 

Most of us won't split the 
message and method and so we 
can't make the difference and 
therefore we are becoming 
antiquated. 



That leads me to ask how the 
church needs to change or 
adjust in order to meet the 
needs of a changing culture? 

You know, one way that I've 
had to change is to study the culture 
more and know where people are 
and get with them, because in 
reading The Herald or Moody or 
other magazines I won't really 
learn where the people are who 
live in Akron. That change in itself 
is a big one, a good one. 

If you read the New Testament, 
you know that when Paul or Peter 
spoke, they seemed to know where 
the people were and they started 
there. When I was in seminary or 
college I learned from someone a 
little cliche about teaching: 'Boy, 
book, boy' which means you start 
with the boy and then show him 
the book and then go back to his 
life to apply what's in the book. I 
think sermons have to do that but 
also the church. 

We need to change also from 
being simply a public worship 
service oriented place to a bit of a 
'shopping mall' where people can 
choose because they hurt in specific 
areas these days. The church can 
minister to that. 

I also think we must learn to 
communiate in a common 
language and with real feelings 
and speak to the issue of pain. The 
church for years had its own 
language and its own way of 
avoiding pain, or pretending that 
every day with Jesus was sweeter 
than the day before, and we all 
knew it wasn't. 

Perhaps one of the harder ways 
to adjust today is to find workers 
among younger adults who do not 
like to make long-term 
commitments or who will not go to 



the same bank just because their 
father did. That's a very difficult 
one and we must learn how to 
challenge people and help them 
see that their lives can have impact 
by serving. 

A pastor in New York told me 
recently he can't even get teachers 
to serve more than a three-month 
commitment at a time, and this 
was at a very good church. We all 
find that the volunteer crew is 
smaller and more selective, so we 
have to challenge people to 
meaningful work that affects lives 
rather than just busy work. We 
must find a way to get to their 
hearts. 

Anything that you want to 
say that you haven't said? 

I think it's important that we 
know you can change a lot of 
methods. We all do it personally 
without changing any of our 
theology. We evaluate how we say 
what we believe and how we 
describe it so that it's very biblical 
and very relevant to today's world, 
because God is always the same 
today as well as yesterday and He 
wants us to communicate in today' s 
world. If Jesus came today, He 
would be born in a garage and not 
a stable, and He would wear the 
clothes of a common man and not 
a robe, and He would be in our 
marketplaces, not in Jerusalem. 

I do want to say that many 
churches are doing this in small 
towns in Pennsylvania as well as 
California and the picture can be 
bright if we're willing to look out 
to where the people are and see 
them with love. 



C HEI^LD 



CE NATIONAL 



Why Brethren National 
Youth Conference 
Is For Your Youth 



Brethren National Youth Conference (BNYC) is one of 
the great events going for our Fellowship. However, mavbe 
you as a pastor, youth leader, or parent, have wondered 
about the cost, the distance, or the benefits of sending your 
youth to BNYC. With so many options vying for the same 
dollar, we recently held a round-table discussion related to 
the benefits of BNYC. This round-table discussion will give 
you the evidence you 're looking for that BNYC is indeed an 
event that your young people, as well as your church, 
cannot afford to miss! Involved in the CE National discussion 
were: 

- Bruce Barlow, BNYC's Director of Deans and Associate 
Pastor at Winona Lake Grace Brethren Church, who has 
been involved with BNYC for more than 20 years. 




Round-table participants Bruce Barlow, 
Ed Lewis, and Angie Fagner discuss BNYC. 



- Ed Lewis, who has been director of Brethren National Youth Conference for 20 wars and is CE National 's Executive 
Director. 

- Angie Fagner, who was last year 's BNYC coordinator and is currently coordinating BNYC '94 for CE National. 



CE National: To start off, could each of you tell me 
what are the strengths of BNYC? 

Ed: I would have to say the commitments the young 
people make to Christ and the local church. 

Angie: BNYC has cutting edge spiritual challenges, 
leadership training, and ministry experience, all in a 
fun atmosphere. Youth take what they see and learn at 
BNYC and live it out at home, school, and in their 
churches. 

Ed: BNYC also has the absolute best youth 
communicators available. Although it's a Grace 
Brethren conference , we' re exposing our young people 
to the country's best evangelical communicators and 



music groups who can really hit where kids are at 
spiritually. 

Angie: Parents typically comment how they can see 
a change and growth in their young people, not just 
the week after BNYC, but throughout the year. Many 
parents want to make sure their kids return just for that 
reason. 

Bruce: Youth leaders often mention to me how they 
appreciate the program's dynamics. BNYC enables 
their youth groups to experience the kind of speakers, 
music, and overall activities which couldn't be 
experienced using only a local church's resources. 

CE National: How is BNYC different from a local 



March 15, 1994 



church retreat or district camp? 

Bruce: It all comes down to philosophy. In the local 
church you're trying to create unity and oneness only 
within the youth group itself. On the district level, the 
philosophy is to develop unity with churches close to 
yours. BNYC is different in that it encourages national 
interaction which creates national unity. At BNYC, 
each young person is given the opportunity of being 
impacted, not only by his own youth group and 
leaders, but by the best young people and youth 
leaders across our Fellowship. Although BNYC 
encourages time to be spent between just a church's 
youth leaders and their youth group, BNYC is much 
bigger than that. I want youth leaders to encourage 
their youth to build ties with other young people 



Young people are coming to 

BNYC with an expectation 

that they're there to do 

spiritual business. 

- Bruce Barlow 



around the nation. I want other sharp youth leaders 
impacting them for the week. After a local church 
youth retreat, young people return saying, "Boy, I'm 
glad I'm a part of this youth group." After BNYC, 
though, they say, "I'm glad I'm a part of this 
Fellowship." I think that's what makes BNYC so 
unique and special compared to a camp or retreat. 

Ed: Tony Campolo believes that when young people 
go to a big event, such as a national conference, and 
are exposed to key speakers, they often go expecting 
to make solid commitments to Christ and actually 
make those commitments. At BNYC '93 we had the 
Call on the Wall poster. I still see those posters in 
churches across our Fellowship where young people 
are continuing to uphold the commitments that they 
made at BNYC. 

Bruce: Young people are coming to BNYC with an 
expectation that they're there to do spiritual business. 
When our youth walk into youth group or church, they 
don't walk in week by week with a sense of, "I expect 



to make a commitment," or, "I expect to change 
because of what I'm going to hear from the Word 
today." But they do at BNYC. And they don't wait 
until the fifth or sixth night . Our largest invitations 
typically happen the first couple of nights. That is 
because the young people come with a sense of focus 
and wanting God to work in their lives from the very 
beginning of the week. 

CE National: In addition to commitments made for 
Christ at BNYC, how does BNYC really help the 
local church? 



Angie: One way 
BNYC helps the local 
church is through the 
Blueprints program, 
which is geared for 
youth leaders and lay 
people in the local 
church. It provides 
solid youth worker 
training, through the 
Sonlife Foundations 
Program, for those in 
churches either with or 
without a strong youth 
program in place. 




Bruce Barlow 



Bruce: BNY C also provides the opportunity to develop 
unity and depth in each youth group. Immediately 
after each evening's main sesion, each youth group 
gathers together with its youth leaders. It allows the 
youth leaders to harvest information on what the Lord 
is doing in each young person's life. Also at those 
meetings, a young person's peers will hear him state, 
"I made a commitment at the main session tonight." 
Three months down the road those peers will be able 
to hold that young person accountable to follow- 
through on the commitment. 

Angie: I think another important area in which 
BNYC benefits the local church is through the 
outreach training and experience provided by the 
BLITZ. I've seen a number of our local youth groups 
use BNYC's BLITZ as a model to create a presence in 
their communities by doing everything from picking 
up trash to passing out tracts. 

Ed: BNYC provides the setting for local churches' 



10 



C HE^LD 



CE NATIONAL 



youth leaders to network as they work together as 
BNYC staff. NAC and Bible quizzing, since it takes 
place on the district level at BNYC, also encourages 
youth leaders to network with their district's youth 
leaders. 

Bruce: Speaking of NAC, that is another way BNYC 
helps the local church. NAC lights a fire under young 
people to nurture their abilities for Christ. BNYC 
plants the seed of thought in the minds of youth to 
develop their abilities when they see others 
participating at BNYC in Bible quizzing, youth choirs, 
mime teams, piano solos, and vocal solos. They then 
will use and develop those abilities in the local church 
before participating in NAC at BNYC. 

Angie: BNYC also has the Twenties Program which 
has been exciting to watch grow over the past several 
years. This program is for singles past high school age 
who want to enjoy BNYC and receive training. 
Although the Twenties Program is fun and provides 
for networking amongst our Fellowship's singles, it 
also can be used by participants to develop or improve 
a singles' ministry in the local church. 

CE National: Although youth groups meet together 
daily as a youth group, go on options as a group, and 
have communion and the concert of prayer together, 
why are they not housed together? 

Bruce: The answer goes back to our comparison 
between BNYC and a camp or retreat. At a camp or 
retreat one stays with the youth leaders from one's 
church, but at BNYC we want the young 
people to be impacted by other adults and 
youth from the Fellowship. Although the 
young people can choose their roommates, 
we want them on a hall in a dorm with a 



Youth are going to be 

impacted by other young people 

and youth leaders from 

across the country. 

- Angie Fagner 



mixture of kids from all over the country because we 
want to create that interactive dynamic. 

Angie: Because some youth leaders would rather be 
with just their young people, they prefer not to be 
housed with other young people outside of their youth 
group. Some churches feel that pressure of, "If we're 
going to invest all this money, we want our youth 
leaders working with our young people for that week " 
We understand and are sensitive to that pressure by 
encouraging youth group time throughout the week. 
However, although it is good for youth groups to be 
with their youth leaders, we think we've got a better 
idea for BNYC in that youth are going to be impacted 
by other young people and youth leaders from across 
the country. The byproduct of this mixing is that our 
Fellowship's youth will feel a part of the Fellowship 
as a whole. 

Ed: Dan Spader, director of Sonlife Ministries said of 
BNYC, "You have something that is extremely unique 
in denominational groups because you are allowing 
the youth group in the local church to be strong and yet 
you're allowing the networking with other Grace 
Brethren Churches. The kids obviously come to BNYC 
because they enjoy being together with other young 
people that they've met from across the country " 

CE National: What makes BNYC unique from other 
national conferences? 

Bruce: Our conference is unique in providing not just 
speakers and activities, but also the m-dorm counselor 




March 15, 1994 



11 




Ed Lewis 



dynamic and a nighttime devotional time where 
relationships can be made with kids from around the 
country. DC '94 and LA '94 are getting a lot of 
publicity and they have a great program, but they have 
not put as much effort into the in-dorm dynamics of 
the week. They say, "We'll offer you the program, but 

you' re on your own 
to find housing and 
meals!" We've 
taken all aspects of 
the week, woven 
them together, and 
created the whole 
BNYC experience. 

Angie: And I think 

that goes back to our 

purpose. We're 

here to help the 

local church, and 

that can't be done 

by promoting just a 

programand saying, 

"Here it is." As we stated earlier, BNYC helps the 

local church in more ways than just providing a 

program for the youth group to attend. 

Ed: At BNYC we want to develop a "family" feel. 
Within the Fellowship family we think the same, we 
dream the same. We may have differences from one 
church to the other, but we are still the same family. 
And I think we need to see that. One can attend various 
conferences like DC '94orthe Young Life conferences, 
but it's not your conference. There is nothing like a 
conference with your own Grace Brethren people. 
That is what makes BNYC so special and unique from 
other national conferences. We would like to increase 
the "family" feel of BNYC even more by having all 
youth pastors and leaders more involved in its 
leadership and planning. 

CE National: What is happening at BNYC '94? 

Angie: We're excited! BNYC '94 will be held at 
Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia from July 
30 to August 5. Jim Custer, Greg Speck, Al Menconi, 
Sammy Tippet, and Barry St. Clair will be our speakers. 
Our music will include 4 Him and Al Denson. There 
will be the BLITZ, Awesome Olympics, Communion, 
Concert of Prayer, O-C-O's (off-campus options), 



and many other activities. The theme this year is 
"Leading the Way" based on I Timothy 4: 12. We have 
some of the most exciting plans that we ha ve ever had ! 

Bruce: From the supervision side, BNYC '94 will 
include some changes. We are funneling the adult 
guests into ministry opportunities at BNYC, into the 



We have strong loyalty, great 

young people and leaders, and 

solid commitments to Christ. 

- Ed Lewis 



Blueprints program, and into counselor positions in 
order to reduce the ratio of young people per counselor. 

CE National: How would you sum up BNYC? 

Ed: I think God has blessed BNYC as it has so 
positively affected thousands of lives. BNYC is unique 
in that we have strong loyalty, great young people and 
leaders, and solid commitments to Christ. Every year 
we have speakers come back and say that this is one 
of the finest groups of young people to which they 
have ever spoken. I hope this year's theme will really 
make a difference in our young people's lives as we 
want to see them "Leading the Way" through their 
example and making a difference in their churches, 
homes, and schools. 




Dan McMaster, editor of this article, is 
Director of Church Relations at CE National 



12 



C HH^LD 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



Missionary of the Year 



JCristen JCirnbauer 



Jxristen was born August 14, 1958, in Moscow, Idalio. At the time, her father 
was a Baptist college pastor at Washington State University in Pullman, 
Washington. Her family later moved to Southern California where her younger 
brother, Evan, was born. Kristen 's father changed professions and became a 
college professor, but her family remained actively involved in church work. 
Kristen received Christ as her Savior at a summer church camp when she was in 
the 4th grade. She shares this personal testimony: 



"Even in my early years I 
remember believing in God. I can 
remember bringing my thanks and 
burdens to Him and experiencing His 
marvelous answers to prayer. Here are 
a few memorable answers to prayer: 

1) Grandmother's surgery with 
little hope that she would make it 
through - 1 cried and prayed that God 
would not let her die, and suddenly I 
was filled with peace. She lived, and 
the doctor said it was a miracle. 

2) My cat ran away when we took 
her to our cabin in the mountains. After 
searching everywhere on the various 
paths, I began to despair. Then I 
remembered to pray. As I finished, I 
heard a 'meow' behind me. I turned 
around and there she was! 

3) When I was old enough to watch 
my brother when my parents were out, 
I sometimes feared that a burglar was 
about the house. When I prayed and put 
my trust in God, my fear subsided and 
many times my parents returned at that 
moment." 

It was while she was in college 
that Kristen really understood how 
relevant God's word is for everyday 
life. She says, "I went to public schools 
all my life until college. I wanted to go 
to a Christian college and selected a 
Lutheran college because of its small 
and friendly atmosphere. That was a 
big mistake. I was not fed spiritually 
and was encouraged by my peers to 
enjoy worldly pleasures instead. I grew 
more and more distant from God and 
my previous close walk with Him . After 
my junior year of college, I went to 
Long Beach to work during the summer 



break. I really had a desire to find a 
good church and Christian fellowship. 
Through several circumstances, the 
Lord directed me to the Grace Brethren 
Church of Long Beach. I immediately 
knew it was God's leading. I got 
plugged into a discipleship group and 
began to grow. It was the first time I 
really understood how relevant God' s 
word is for everyday life and that He 
had a special plan for my life." 

Kristen became acquainted with 
Ted a year later in the college 
department at the Long Beach Grace 
Brethren Church. They began dating 
and were married 2 Va 
years later. 

Kristen' s children, 
Daniel who is 10 
months and Carrie, 3, 
fill her life right now. 

The Kirnbauers 
live in Niiza City, about 
30 minutes by train from 
downtown Tokyo. They 
live in a mansion, which 
is a nice apartment 
building. Their home is 
comfortable, but small 
and crowded campared 
to American homes. Refrigerators and 
washing machines are smaller, so 
Kristen does laundry every day and 
hangs it outside, since a dryer is too 
expensive to run and too small to be 
worth its while. Shops, schools, the 
post office, most doctors, and church 
are all conveniently close by bicycle. 
Daniel rides on the front and Carrie on 
the back when Kristen runs errands. 
Streets are narrow and busy with cars, 



buses, and motorcycles, so she must be 
careful. Pedestrians are also in the 
streets as there are very few sidewalks 
where they live. Carrie will be attending 
Japanese preschool next year, and she 
will be the only foreigner in the school. 
All the teachers have given her a big 
welcome and seem to be looking 
forward to her coming. Ted Kirnbauer 
is involved in church planting and 
evangelism. He is presently helping to 
start a church in dieir area. 

When asked about her goals as an 
individual and a missionary, Kristen 
listed first a desire to have a closer 
walk with God, to know Him more 
intimately, and to always be aware of 
His presence in her life. She went on to 
say, "I want to be godly and to be a real 
person at the same time. That is, to be 
more Christ-like (compassionate, 
loving, honest, and with honest 
motives). I'd like to have more time to 
study and memorize God' s word." She 
also would like to perfect her Japanese 
so she can share the gospel more clearly 
and accurately. And she'd like to be a 
good example to the other women in 
their church, one who lives what she- 
teaches and who is able to help them 
grow in their faith. 

Because she has 
two small children at 
home, Kristen's 
ministry has been 
limited. Right now she 
is involved in the 
following areas: 

1) Evangelistic 
English classes with 
Bible study in her 
home. She is currently 
meeting with nine 
people weekly 
(children and 
mothers). 

2) Discipleship with a new 
Christian mother. 

3) Life style evangelism - outreach 
to neighbors and the community - going 
to parks, inviting people over, etc. 

4) Helping in Sunday School, 
overseeing and teaching when 
necessary. 

5) Encouragement of believers in 
the church through phone calls, letters, 
and meeting together. 




March 15, 1994 



13 



CE NATIONAL 




CE National Executive Director Ed Lewis presents a check to 
Operation Restore Iowa Committee Chairman Pastor Gary 
Kochhieser of the Cedar Rapids GBC. Mick Wenger and 
Ralph Gradey also served on the committee. 



Early in the summer of 1993, disaster struck Iowa. 
Torrential rains caused massive rivers to swell 
above their banks. Thousands tried to stop the floodwaters. 
Despite their best efforts, the rivers could not be contained, 
and the landscape was quickly flooded. Nothing escaped. 
Homes, farms and businesses were all covered by the murky 
water. Thousands were driven from their homes, only to 
return and find most of their possessions damaged or 
destroyed. For some, however, there was a ray of hope. 

Shordy after the flooding began, CE National became 
a clearinghouse for donations and support. Operation Restore 
Iowa was established. A committee was formed to assess the 
flood victim' s need based on three criteria: ( 1 ) the person or 
family had to have some connection to a Grace Brethren 
Church; (2) government relief was not available; and (3) 
each individual's gift would not exceed $1,000. God's 
people across our Fellowship then rose to the challenge to 
fund Operation Restore 
Iowa. To date, more than 
ten thousand dollars have 
been raised to help those 
hardest bit. And while many 
physical needs were met, 
the greatest part of the story 
is in the lives that were 
touched. 



Operation 



Roger and Susan Phillips moved their family of six 
to Iowa from Alabama early in the summer of 
1993. They bought a house and were told, "it doesn't get 
water in the basement." Accepting this statement, they 
remodeled the room for use as a bedroom for two of their 
children. As the flooding began, water seeped into the 
basement, damaging the newly renovated room. The Phillips 
were forced to exhaust much of their savings to install 
waterproofing systems to keep the room dry. Through 
Operation restore Iowa, they were reimbursed for some of 
the waterproofing cost, and their children now have a dry 
place to sleep. Because of Operation Restore Iowa, the 
Phillips began attending the Dallas Center GBC, and are 
now active in the ministry there. 





NATIONAL 



"I want to express my heartfelt thanks to you for remembering me 
in my time of need. The way people have responded has almost 
overwhelmed me. I guess the Lord knows what my needs are and 
is taking care of them. Again, thank you for your concern, love and 
kindness. God bless." 

Marge Shadle 



While there is often government aid in a disaster 
like this, sometimes the requirements for 
assistance are difficult, if not impossible, to meet. Such was 
the case for Marge Shadle of the Cedar Rapids GBC. When 
her basement flooded, her clothes dryer was ruined. The 
government told her it would replace the dryer only if she 
would set it on a two foot high concrete slab. However, at 
that height, she would not be able to reach the new dryer! 
Because of the generosity of Grace Brethren people, a new 
dryer was purchased and placed where Marge can use it. 



14 



C HEI^\LD 



Restore Iowa 



Operation Restore Iowa also touched people outside 
the Grace Brethren Fellowship. That was good 
news for one woman, a co-worker of a man in the Dallas 
Center GBC. Her house suffered considerable structural 
damage during the floods . The hot water heater was damaged 
along with the roof, foundation and furnace. As a single 
parent, she could not afford a new water heater. For several 
months she and her daughter took cold showers and heated 
water on the stove for bathing and washing dishes. Through 
Operation Restore Iowa, they now have a hot water heater 
and hot water. They have seen first hand the love of Christ 
in action, and are now open to hearing more. 

The Patterson family, whose son is active in the 
Waterloo GBC youth group, also experienced the 
love of Christ in action. They live very close to one of the 
rivers that flooded. As the river rose, it literally began to 
flow through their house! Many of their possessions were 
badly damaged and their furnace was ruined. Operation 
Restore Iowa helped the Pattersons buy a new furnace. The 
church continues to have contact with this family. 
"Sometimes you can get [people' s] attention by meeting 
physical needs," said Associate Pastor Ron Weimer. "You 
just never know what the Lord will do down the road." 





The Restore Iowa Fund assisted Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Patterson 
and family in replacing a furnace that was damaged by the 
flooding. 






"I can't tell you how much I appreciate the assistance in paying 
for the mattresses. The kids had been sleeping on the floor for a 
couple of months after their mattresses were damaged by trie 
water. I'm a single parent so this really helped relieve the burden. 
God bless you all and thank you so much." 

Jeanne Latting and family 



Pastor Ron and his family were also impacted by the 
flood. His son, Jason, a junior this year at Grace 
College, was driving near his parent's home last sumer 
when he suddenly found himself caught in a flash flood. He 
was able to get the truck out of the water, but when the family 
went to get it the next day, it wouldn' t start. Further inspection 
showed the engine was ruined and needed to be replaced. 
The insurance company purchased a rebuilt engine for them, 
but would not pay to install it. Operation Restore Iowa paid 
for the installation, and Jason is now on the road again at 
Grace. 

Each of these stories is evidence that people 
inside and outside the family of God have been 
touched by your thoughtful and generous support. We 
would like to take this oppormnity to thank all of you who 
gave to this fund. 

Please continue to pray for the people of the Midwest. 
With heavy winter snow beginning to melt on top of already 
saturated ground, forecasters are predicting more flooding 
this spring. 

Paul wrote, "At the present time, your plenty will 
supply what they need, so in turn their plenty will supply 
what you need" (2 Corinthians 8: 14). Thank you for supplying 
the need. 



March 15, 1994 



15 



SPORTS 



f he Motivators 

The fires within that motivate the great ones 

I By David Egner 



Everyone who attended or viewed the 1981 playoff 
game between the San Diego Chargers and the 
Miami Dolphins surely remembers the awesome 
courage of Kellen Winslow, the veteran tight end 
of the Chargers. Along with perennail All-Pro Charile 
Joiner and quarterback Dan Fouts, he had carried coach 
Don "Air" Coryell' s team through the long season and into 
the playoffs. 

Playing hurt and nearing exhaustion, Winslow was 
catching pass after pass as the high-scoring, seesaw game 
went into one overtime, then another. It took him longer and 
longer to get back on his feet after each reception and 
subsequent tackle. By the time Rolf Benirschke kicked the 
game-winning field goal for the Chargers, Kellen Winslow 
had 13 punishing catches for 166 yards, a touchdown, and 
victory over Bob Griese and the Dolphins. 

What drives a man like Kellen Winslow to keep going'? 
What motivates the great players to compete game in and 
game out at their very best? What straps a race driver like 
Dale Jarrett, who has won NASCAR' s "big one," the 
Daytona 500, and has nothing left to prove, back into the 
cockpit of his car? What brings veteran performers like 
Moses Yl alone and Wayne Gretzky and John Elway and 
Arnold Palmer back into the arena of competition long 
after they've reached the top? What drives them? 

The answer to tliis questions can tell us some important 
things about life. It can motivate us to reach and even surpass 
our own personal goals. 

One thing is certain: It's not money. When a person's 
been at the top of his or her professional sport in these days 
of multi-million dollar contracts, it's not the drive to 
accumulate even more. A big paycheck may be a motivator 
to an athlete on the way up, and a pride factor after he' s 
there, but in his heart he's out there for deeper, more 
complex reasons. 

O ThC ego One reason an athlete will keep playing 
after he' s made a lot of money and achieved greatness is that 
he has a strong desire for continued recognition. He puts 
himself through the yearly grind of conditioning, training 
camp, a long season, and grueling playoffs because it 
presents him with the ongoing opportunity to demonstrate 
that he' s still the best. It makes him feel good for his skills 
to be recognized by the media and the world. 

@TI|© Vision* Athletes are also motivated to keep 
competing after great achievements because they are striving 
to become what they see themselves to be. They see 
themselves as excelling and constantly improving. They 
thrive on opportunities to demonstrate new skills. They love 
the challenge to reach new levels of creativity. 



Eric Liddel , whose story was immortalized in the film 
Chariots of Fire, was a man with a vision. His victory for 
the British Empire in the 1924 Olympic Games was 
enormous. But the drive to lead through example was his 
way of life. Few remember that after the games he went to 
China as a missionary Even fewer know that he died 
ministering in China to prisoners of war who w ere trying to 
survive in deplorable conditions. 

A Way Of Li#C Joe Carter, whose ninth-inning 
home run won the World Series for the Blue Jays last 
October, is motivated to be accepted by his peers. He said 
in an interview, "Unfortunately, T ve played in towns where 
the media is not as prominent as Chicago or New York. But 
publicity is not why I'm in the ball game. I've earned the 
respect of my teammates and peers. That's all that matters " 

On and off the field, Joe Carter has a vision to be the 
kind of husband, father, and Christian who brings credit to 
his family and to the Lord. His life is styled around a 
passage from the Bible that has alot to say about motivation. 

But you are a chosen people, a royal priestliood, a lioly 
nation, a people belonging to God, that you may declare the 
praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His 
marvelous light. Once you were not a people but now you 
are the people of God; once you liad not received mercy, but 
now you have received mercy. 

Dear friends, I urge you, as aliens and strangers in the 
world, to abstain from sinful desires, which war against 
vour soul. Live such good lives among the pagans that, 
though tliex accuse you of doing wrong, they may see your 
good deeds and glorify God (I Peter 2:9-12). 

These verses set a goal for a select group of people- 
those who are believers in Christ. The passage spells out 
some distinctives-some motivators for people like that. 
They can be motivated in knowing that they are: 
I a people chosen by God 
| a royal nation following Christ the King 
| a people who belong to God and they have a task to do 
| to declare the praises of God 

t to live so that others will see their good works and glorify 
God 

More and more athletes can identify with that because 
they are believers in Jesus. 

What is driving you? What is your vision? Does it 
include a desire to excel in sports ? In music? In a career? In 
every aspect of life? 

Is obeying Christ part of your goal? Do you try to 
glorify God? When those two factors come together in your 
way of life, you'll be on the way to becoming a hall-of- 
famer, even if you don' t play any sport at all! 

Used by permission 
Sports Spectrum • Grand Rapids. Mlchgan 



16 



CHHQLD 



HOME MISSIONS 



A SOLDIER GOES HOME... HIS WORK LIVE! 

A Tribute To Colonel Donald F. Carter 

Chaplain (Retired) 

SEPTEMBER 19, 1908 - OCTOBER 3, 1993 
by Larry N. Chamberlain 



J. first met Don Carter in La Mirada, California, 
in 1979," recalls Army Chaplain Chuck Card. 'The 
purpose of our meeting was to talk about the Arm) 
chaplaincy, and he encouraged me in my endeavor 
to pursue God's will for my life. When I finally 
graduated from Talbot Theological Seminary and 
met the requirements to become a chaplain, Don 
was at my graduation with a big smile congratulating 
me. I am an Army Chaplain today because of his 
gentle encouragement and influence. 

That was Don Carter. . . gentle, compassionate, 
available, encouraging. Yet beneath that kind and 
gentle exterior was a soldier' s heart of determination, 
strength, and courage. Following his own graduation 
from Seminary in 1934, 
Don pastored several 
churches in southern 
California until 1943 when 
he received his commission 
as a Chaplain in the U.S. 
Army. During World War 
II, Don ministered to 
servicemen in the combat 
areas of Germany, France, 
and Czechoslovakia, 
followed from 1950 to 1952 
by a combat tour in Korea. 

Don (with his lovely wife, Dorothy) served in eight 
installations stateside, as well as overseas tours in 
Germany and Japan. 

Chaplain Carter attended the Harvard Chaplain 
School and was the recipient of the Army 
Achievement and Commendation Medals, as well 
as the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Clusters and the 
Silver Star. Following his retirement from the U.S. 
Army in 1965, Don served several pastorates in 



California as well as a lengthy term as Endorsing 
Agent for the Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches. In the latter role, Don was instrumental 
in encouraging and strengthening Grace Brethren 
Chaplains as they served around the world, including 
Vietnam. 

And his ministry lives on. During a recent Billy 
Graham Crusade in Japan, where 14,000 people 
responded to the Gospel of Christ, a welFknown 
Japanese evangelical by the name of Pastor Furiyama 
served as the translator for Dr. Graham for each of 
the four nights of the crusade. When Pastor Furiyama 
was a young high school student in the earl}' 1950' s, 
he attended a Bible study where he accepted the 
Lord as his personal 
Savior. The class was led 
by Chaplain Don Carter. 
In a letter dated 
November 1 , 1993, nearly 
one month after Don's 
homegoing, Dorothy 
wrote: 

"lam writing to thank 
you for the beautiful 
flowers Home Missions 
sent for Don 's funeral. 
They were red, white, and 
blue and had an American flag in the arrangement. 
I shall not forget your concern for Don these past 
few years. He is with our Lord whom he loved and 
longed to be with. He went quietly just as he did 
all things. His life shall always be a testimony to 
me." 

Indeed, as his life shall always be for all of us 
who knew and loved him. We honor you, Don, and 
salute you. 




March 15, 1994 



17 



HERALD NEWSLINE/FELLOWSHIP NEWS 




The Ministry 2000 Award was given to 
Larry and Sandra Olguin during Pastor 
Richard'sannual State of the Church Address 
on January 23. The award is given annually 
by Pastor Rick Todd in special recognition of 
a ministry a person, couple, or family are 
doing in the church that is reaching out and 
touching lives for eternity. Larry and Sandra 
received the award this year for their 
leadership of the small group study with 
young people that started in the church's 
neighborhood when they got involved with a 
family that had just lost their son. 
Congratulations, Larry and Sandra! 



Pat Phillips reports that a tremendous youth retreat over 
the weekend resulted in five first time decisions and fifteen 
teens baptized in the Sunday evening service at the Columbus, 
Ohio Eastside GBC. 

William H. Schaffer, or "Pastor Bill" as he is affectionately 
called in Kenai, Alaska, is recovering from surgery behind his 
right ear for possible cancer, in an Anchorage Hospital. He was 
the guest of Attorney Roger Noll with Pastor Luke Kauffman of 
the Grace Brethren Church, who offered spiritual comfort while 
the Brethren in Kenai prayed. Schaffer is still writing Daily 
Devotions, of which he has written over 600 and two books, 
although he is legally blind. He is nearing his 90th birthday. 

Howard Immel has accepted the call of the Singer Hill 
Grace Brethren Church in Johnstown, PA. The Immels will 
begin their ministry at the church on Sunday, April 10th. Prayer 
is requested for a smooth transition into the work there and for 
a quick sale of their home in London, Ohio. 

Bob Nicholson, youth pastor at GBC, Lexington, Ohio, 
reports a great children's retreat was held the week of February 
5-6. Three area churches, Delaware GBC, Woodville GBC, 
and Lexington GBC, combined in the retreat event. 140 
children were in attendance with Connie McNeal, children's 
co-ordinator at Delaware, serving as featured speaker. Positive 
results were very evident with four children responding to 
salvation decisions and 60 children expressing a desire for 
baptism or rededication of desire to live for God. 

Where will Steve Green, R.C. Sproul, H.B. London, Bill 
Bright, Knute and Jeannie Larson, Christine Wyrtzen, Greg 
Buchanan, and Dan Allan be during FGBC National 



Conference? With us! Join us July 
23-28 at the lovely Grenelefe Resort 
near Orlando, Florida, for a National 
Conference designed in every aspect 
to serve and encourage you and to 
"Ignite New Vision" for yourself, your 
family, and your church. To make 
your reservation call 1 -800-237-9549. 
Identify yourself as part of Grace 
Brethren. 



From CE National: Anyone 
seeking church staff may send 
resumes to CE National at P.O. Box 
365, Winona Lake, IN 46590 or call 219-267-6622. Also 
churches needing youth pastors and other staff members may 
call or write CE National to request resumes of available 
people. 




Larry and Sandra Olguin 




CORRECTIONS FOR THE ANNUAL 

The following churches listed in the 1994 Grace Brethren 
Annual are no longer member churches of the Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches: Findlay, Ohio; Galion, Ohio; 
Somerset, Pennsylvania; and Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Corrections on page 3 of the Annual: Membership 
Committee - Terrance Taylor ('96), Richard Todd ('96). 

Regional Representatives add: Robert Divine ('96), Central. 

New phone number for Doug and Jacquie Jensen, Norton, 
Ohio is (216) 825-9737. 

James Elwell, 101 Accomac Turning, Yorktown, VA 23693 

Richard DeArmey, 1357 Meadowbank Drive, Worthington, 
OH 43085 

Dale Jenks, 168 B Gailor Road, Gansevoort, NY 12831 , 
phone (518) 587-3654 

Fort Wayne First GBC - phone (219) 447-2414 

Ralph and Elizabeth Hall, 5708 34th Court West, 
Bradenton, FL 3421 - phone (81 3) 751 -5261 



18 



C HEI^LD 



GRACE VILLAGE 







^Are \you Jjriahfenina 
o^o/neone's Day? 



by Fran Bancroft Warner 



My Grandfather Bancroft used to say 
to me, "Frannie girl, cast your bread 
upon the water; and it will come back 
buttered and jammed." What a delicious visual 
for a youngster! 

Now that I am older, I realize this wonderfully 
simple phrase holds much wisdom and insight 
into the principle of being a Good Samaritan. 

Each resident of Grace Village Retirement 
Community has a story to tell. Among these 
special people are retired missionaries, pastors, 
farmers, housewives, teachers, professional sales 
representatives, and bankers. These individuals 
have accumulated a lifetime of beliefs and 
experiences. 

Several retired missionaries including Rosella 
Cochran and Mabel Hamilton continue to serve a 
MISSION right here at Grace Village. They, 
along with others, meet regularly to pray for 
fellow missionaries currently in the field. Other 
Bible study and prayer groups meet within the 
Village, providing exciting opportunities for both 
residents and employees to strengthen their 
Christian life. 

Many of our employees 
have reported that until they 
began work at the Village, 
they had never been exposed 
to a company where daily 
prayer for others was the 
"norm." 

Giving of one's time is 
contagious at our retirement 
community. A visitor might 
be surprised to find how 
actively involved many of 



the residents are. They volunteer to help deliver 
mail, lead Chapel services, play the piano and 
organ, serve as receptionists and escorts, process 
menus, tend rose and vegetable gardens, type, 
sew and repair, help in the maintenance 
department and assist in feeding Health Care 
residents. 

We are blessed to have community volunteers 
who bring a little of the outside into the Village. 
Community volunteers like John Crum, Pacida 
Franada, Elaine Brenneman and Susan Stephens, 
spend many hours visiting on a one-to-one basis 
with residents, baking cookies, and folding 
laundry. These volunteers have expressed through 
their actions their support in the mission of Grace 
Village. 



The mission of Grace Village 
Retirement Community is to enrich 
the lives of our older adult residents 

in the safety and security of a 
Christian en vironment. 



r 



I would like 
information about: 

□ Grace Village Retirement 
Comunity 



□ 



□ 



L. 



Volunteer Opportunities at 
the Village 

Charitable Gifts to the 
Village 

Receiving the Quarterly 
Newsletter 



PLEASE FILL OUT AND SEND TO 

Grace Village Retirement Community 

Box 337 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 



~l 



_ZIP 



J 



March 15, 1994 



19 



Community 
volunteer John 
Crum assists Bea 
Crum (John's wife 
& staff member) 
at the Village. 




Raymond and 
Edith Gingrich 
receive mail from 
Al Miller, resident 
volunteer. 



Frances Ogden, resident, visits with 
community volunteer - Susan Stephens 



Uhe S^ifi of Snaring 

a/ c?race Uillaoe J\efirement KJommunifu 

is Qjoniaoious ! 



We invite your inquiries about 

how you can participate with 

your time, prayers, & gifts 

. . Even long distance. . .. 

GRACE VILLAGE 
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 

P.O. BOX 337 

WINONA LAKE, IN 46590 

(219) 372-6200 



BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

P.O. Box 544 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Address Correction Requested 



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U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Winona Lake. IN 
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BRETHREN MISSIONARY 



C HERMD 


Volume 56, No. 4 April, 1 994 


~90jF%' *«™, 


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TTi€ light of the morning 


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The night is ended, 


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3rom jloom, from sorrow, 




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The ford is risen, 


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I 

c HEl^LD 



EDITORIAL 



WHY DO I 
WATCH THE NEWS? 

by Jeff Carroll 



Why do I watch the news? Because I really 
enjoy knowing what's going on. I love my TV. It 
informs me about so many different events that 
affect my life. 

For example, Consider Crime: I learn that 

without a doubt, I'll be abducted, dragged 

off in a wooded area, chopped up and left 

for dead. 

Or on Health care: I learn that I'm a sneeze 

away from disaster. 
Or on the Economy: I'm a paycheck away 

from bankruptcy. 
Taxes: There's an important topic for this 
time of year. April 15th is upon us. It's 
scary that I may only be an audit away 
from prison, or so it seems. 
I also learn that gays want to be in the military 
and also march in the St. Patrick's Day parade. 
Why can't they choose another time like Ground 
Hog Day? North Korea wants to develop the A 
bomb and long range missiles so that they can 
blow up their region. One wonders why they 
would want to do that. 

And in case you don't have enough to worry 
about! Don't forget Bosnia. News reporters are 
telling us that the conflict in this region could 
escalate into World War III. 

Were you also aware that your congressman 
is a crook? I'm sure glad that mine is not, though 
he's still un-indicted. And he'll make ends meet 
on just $133,600 per year. 

Trouble, Trouble, Trouble, we do have Trouble 
with a capital "T." So much trouble that a secular 
anthropologist might be tempted to conclude that 
our evolutionary progress has reached a genetic 
dead-end. Death, disaster, and destruction - this 
steady diet of hopelessness leads me to turn off 
my TV in despair. 



There was one story, however, that caught 
my attention. In Artesia, New Mexico, Mary 
Bratcher accidentally ran over her own pet dog 
Browny. The family tearfully buried the mixed- 
breed dog in a field near their ranch home. The 
family's young son, Toby, age 3, refused to 
accept that his pet was dead. Browny's mother 
refused to accept it also. The mother dog dug 
Browny out of the ground and the following 
day the family returned from a trip to discover 
Browny caked with mud and dried blood on 
their porch. Browny, 
barely breathing, 
was rushed to a vet- 
erinarian. Browny will 
recover. Browny has 
lost an eye, has a 
broken shoulder and 
has a new name: 
Lazarus. 

What a resurrec- 
tion story! But we all 
know about the 
mother of all resur- 
rection accounts; the 

resurrection of Jesus. When I think about His 
resurrection, I think about Heaven. And when I 
think about Heaven, I get excited because in 
heaven there will be no more crime, no more 
death, no more economic worries, no more taxes, 
tears, or trouble, and praise God, no more TV to 
bring us the bad news. 

Yes, Jesus is alive and today when my gov- 
ernment desires to become my god, I hope to 
say, "Thanks, but no thanks. I'm already commit- 
ted to a perfect living Savior who has a wonderful 
plan and purpose for my life." And folks, that's 
good news! 




April, 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



BRETHREN 



MISSIONARY 




Volume 56, No. 4 






April, 1994 



3 EDITORIAL 

Why Do I Watch The News? 

5 WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 
Tom and Sharon Stalker Report 

From the Republic of Chad 

6 CHURCH FOCUS 

What Makes Grace Church Tick? 

7 CE NATIONAL 
Ideas Page 

8 Following in the First 
Christians Footsteps 

9 The Master' s Art Work 

10 SPORTS 
Pele: A Tribute 

1 1 What' s Cooking at GBC, 
Longview, Texas? 

The Story About Traveler, 
and How He Kept Traveling 

12 WOMEN'S MINISTRIES 
A Faithful Woman 

13 Internationals U.S.A. - Training a 
New Type of Missionary 

14 School Prayer and the Decline 
of America 

15 Grace Community Church 
Celebrates "50th" 

16 His Eye is On the Sparrow 

17 HERALD NEWSLINE 

18 FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



Would you have an opinion on anything you would like to share 

with the other readers of this magazine? If so, write to 

Brethren Missionary Herald Magazine 

P.O. Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

(100 words or less) 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Dan McMaster 
Foreign Missions 

Tom Julien 

Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 

Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 

Jesse B Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 

Nora Macon 
Herald News Service: 
1-800-32-32-BMH 
(including Indiana) 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is a publication of the Fellowship 
of Grace Brethren Churches, published monthly by the Brethren 
Missionary Herald Co., P.O. Box 544, 1104 Kings Highway. 
Winona Lake, IN 46590. Telephone (219) 267-7158 

FAX Number: 219-267-4745 

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Please include payment with order. Prices include postage. 
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News items contained in each issue are presented for 
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Please allow four weeks for the change to become effective. 



Herald Magazine Policy 
News and Advertising Policy 

The Herald magazine offers space for promotional material to the 
boards, churches and members of the NFGBC. This includes 
publicizing special events, seminars, programs, or advertising for 
an organization. Items that are news oriented will be pnnted at no 
charge. Beginning with the April 1992 issue, to distinguish 
between paid advertising and free news material, all purchased ad 
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cHEfyLD 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



Tom and Sharon Stallter 

Report From the Republic of Chad 

Tom and Sharon Stallter are missionaries serving in the Republic of Chad. Linked with Frank and Karin Puhl sent 
out by the German Grace Brethren Churches for ministry to Muslims in Chad, the Stallters ' ministry emplwsis is on the 
black African population in tlxe South. They are the only GBFM missionaries working with the Grace Brethren Churches 
there in local church development, lay-leadership training, outreach ministries, and church planting. 

Along with this ministry among tlie 80 Grace Brethren churches in Southern Chad, the Stallters are also involved with 
the Bible Institute, medical evangelism, Summer Institute of Evangelism, leadership training seminars, and the Missionary 
Society of the Grace Brethren Churches in Chad. 

Only 60 of some 180 ethnic tribes have been reached with the 
Gospel in Chad, leaving 120 outside Christ and enslaved to tradi- 
tional tribal animism. The number of unreached villages is much 
greater. We want to see other villages and peoples reached with the 
Gospel We want to see the churches that exist strengthened to minister 
in their communities, to provide pastoral training for new churches, 
and to send missionaries to unreached villages. In all of this, of course, 
we struggle in the context of a country racked with poverty and the 
sickness and famine that accompany it. It is a context torn by civil strife 
as well, where political, religious, and tribal divisions are never at 
rest. It is a situation wliere only the peace of God can bring hope to the 
heart and the help of God's people in other lands can thrust the 
ministry of the Gospel ahead. 




The Stallter family 



Dear Friends in the National WMC, 

We trust you had a very meaningful Christmas season 
and that the new year will bring even more blessings from 
God in every way. We enjoyed our Christmas in Chad this 
year and participated in the special services at the GBC here 
in Moundou with over 600 in attendance. This is a new 
record for attendance and everyone was encouraged. The 
new GBC on the edge of town also had good attendance. 
There are now 40 members there. 

We want to thank you for your involvement in the 
ministry project for Bicycles for Evangelism. Notice of 
your generous gift arrived here two weeks ago. It is an 
encouragement to us and to the ministry here to know of 
your concern, prayer, and sacrifice to see the Gospel 
continue to go out in this desolate place. The pastors here 
join us in our gratefulness to you. 

The kids had vacation from school for two weeks over 
Christmas and Sharon started with them again on Monday 
the 10th. School is going well for them. It takes a lot of 
Sharon's time but she enjoys it. We are concerned about 
next year now for Nathan. He will begin high school 
correspondence courses and will need some supervision 
the first year. We are praying that God will supply someone 
qualified to help oversee this program. Costs are much too 
high to sent him to Zaire or Kenya for high school. 

Everyone is real positive about the way the ministry is 
developing here in spite of the unsettled situation in the 



country and the poverty brought on by it. Others in the U.S. 
have taken interest in the ministry projects too and this is an 
encouragement. As soon as the funds arrive here I will be 
purchasing four bicycles for youth outreach among the 
churches. This involves evangelism and the setting up of an 
organized youth program in each area. Three of these will 
be purchased with your gift. Another will be purchased for 
a pastor who is overseeing the beginning of four new 
churches while pastoring his own. This will give him the 
possibility of getting to these new points more often since 
walking takes so much time. 

We have been having trouble receiving funds from the 
states here so pray that this will be cleared up soon. The 
Central African States are struggling through a devaluation 
of their currency and this is probably the reason for the 
delay of transfer through France. We would prefer not go 
get funds until the devaluation is finished, but we need that 
to happen soon. We have interested all the cash we have on 
hand in supplies for the ministry so as not to lose too much 
through the devaluation. 

Thank you again for your involvement with us here. 
Your prayer and help are a real encouragement. 
Yours In His Work, 
Tom and Sliaron Stallter 



Note: A gift of $932.00 was given by the Northern 
AUantic District for the Bicycles for Evangelism project. 



April, 1994 



CHURCH FOCUS 



What Makes 

Grace Church 

Tick? 



Last Sunday, I sat in the evening 
session of our periodic "Newcomer's 
Orientation" class. It involves a I'M hour 
morning session, and a 2 hour evening 
session. Although if is required of new 
members, one does not need to be a 
membership candidate to attend. There 
were 55 interested, and for the most part 
excited people present. They had been 
attending Grace Church for a few weeks to 
a few months Some were brand new be- 
lievers, some were mature Christians, per- 
haps new to our area, and at least to our 
church. What brought them here? What 
was making them come back week after 
week? 

Grace Church resulted from the 
merger of two good-sized, healthy 
churches, over four years ago: Grace 
Community Church of Rossmoor, which 
met in a former school, and was begun by 
Grace Brethren of Long Beach with 150 
people or so, in 1 981 ; and Grace Fellowship 
Church (formerly North Long Beach 
Brethren) of Long Beach which had been in 
existence for over 60 years. In December 
of 1992 we finally moved into our own new 
buildings, four of them, on 12 acres of land 
costing $6 million, and the buildings cost 
another $6 million We have a current debt 
of only $1 .9 million. 

Immediately upon moving into our new 
facilities, attendance jumped 300-400 per 
week, averaging 1238 in two morning 
church services alone, at 8:30 am and 
10:15 am. Now in our second year here, we 
are averaging another 150 more per week, 




Senior Pastor, Dr. 
family: Michelle, 



900 seat Chuch Auditorium clothe left, Church ottos building 
wilt nurseries on frsttbor Is title nght, and 2 story school and 
educational txildng s behm, nousng a X0 student Crnstan 
School, K thru 69i grade, as mil as prowling taaimes tor Sunday 
School and youth actMtos. 



and are being forced to consider starting a 
third service, Saturday night or Sunday 
morning. What is causing this steady, almost 
spectacular growth? 

We have an excellent senior pastor, 
who preaches Biblical, application-oriented 
sermons. He's a graduate of Dallas 
Seminary, with about 15 years of ministry 
experience behind 
him, and getting better 
all the time! Lots of 
churches have good 
preaching, but don't 
always grow. 

We have a 
wonderful music and 
worship ministry, 
balancing worship 
choruses with old 
hymns in singing, and 
with a variety of 
instrumental and 
vocal groups of top quality. Worship style 
leans to the contemporary side, but is 
balanced. Still, we don't please everybody 
with this, and as good as it is, it doesn't 
guarantee growth. 

We have a strong pastoral staff of 
specialists; currently nine pastors, six of 
whom are full-time and three part-time, 
with well-balanced and well-managed 
responsibilities. That helps. 

We have beautiful new buildings in an 
easy-to-find location (we're on a race track !) 
And certainly that has attracted some. 

We have an involved membership. 
There are at least 60 ministry teams 
currently in our church led mostly by lay 
people, representing all sorts of ministries 
in our church and in our community. This is 
very important, and growing constantly. 

But all these good things would not 
begin to explain our growth, without an 
overall strategy: a strategy that has become 
real to the pastoral staff, the elder board, 
and to the congregation as a whole We 
have such a strategy, and an easy way to 
present it and remember it - a baseball 
diamond! The purpose of a baseball game 
is to get your players around the bases, to 
home plate. That's the only way you score! 
The church is a community, and is in a 
much larger community, at home plate. We 
like to think of first base as a milestone for 
the curious : who by coming to church are 
saying, "I'm exposing my life to Christianity." 
And we are saying to them, "we are an 
accepting church." So we stay away from 
traditional churchianity terms and baggage. 
We don't have a "sanctuary", but an 
attractive auditorium We don't have 
hymnbooks, but the words of all our songs 
are published (with permission) in our 
weekly bulletin. We don't have a "dress 
code." We try to be totally "user friendly" to 
the unchurched At offering time, we remind 
them that their presence is the only gift we 
expect from them, and our church is happily 
supported by those who are members and 




Mick Ukteja and his 
Louise and Mark 



regulars. And part of our "Newcomer's Ori- 
entation" is when Pastor Mick introduces 
himself, and explains the Grace Church 
strategy to them, visually and verbally. 

Now our goal is to get them to second 
base, as the " convinced ." As they make this 
step, they are saying, "I am accepting Christ 
as my personal Savior." And we are saying 
to them, "we are a 
disciplining church," 
offering many 
things to help you 
grow in Him; 
Sunday School and 
Adult Bible 
Fellowship classes, 
small groups, our 
weekly Worship 
Celebrations (of 
course!), and many 
other things, 
including our 3- 
session "Growing in Christ" seminar. 

Then we want to get them to third 
base, the place of the " committed: " by 
which they are saying, "I'm developing my 
spiritual maturity, growing in grace." And 
we're saying, "we are an equipping church " 
We have a special seminar "Discovering 
my gifts and talents" that we offer 
periodically, and we are welcoming them 
into ministries in the church and the com- 
munity. 

Now we are heading for home plate, 
the " community ." As they take this step, 
they are saying, "I want to do my mission in 
the world, I want to be what God wants me 
to be." And we are saying, "We are an 
expanding church." We offer skills and ex- 
periences in learning to share their faith 
effectively, and being with others who are 
doing this. 

Some Christians have been stuck on 
second base all of their lives, while others 
have never gotten past third! We'd like to 
get a much larger percentage scoring for 
Him! 

And that really fulfills our Mission 
Statement: "To glorify God by moving 
people toward maturity in Christ - helping 
them to grow in their relationship with God, 
other Christians and to the world." 




Grace Church office buiding is central, with ottices and 

conference room on the second floor Entrance to the 900 

seat auditorium e on the left, and tie two story Chnstan 

School and Education bJIding is behind 



C HEI^LD 



CE NATIONAL 



ABF Evaluation Form 

Try using this evaluation form to determine the heartbeat of your ABF: 

A. What I like about the class is. . . 

B. I'd say the purpose of the class is to... 

C. Three personal needs I face weekly are. . . 

D. Please circle the best response (5 being "always" and 1 being "never"): 

1 . I feel a part of this class : 

2. The teaching is practical and challenging: 

3. Everyone here knows my name: 

E. Please give a letter grade to the following in your ABF: 

1. Relationship/Fellowship: 

2. Prayer/Concern/Care: 

3. Spiritual growth in my life: 

4. Feeling accountable to the group (discipleship): 

5. Outreach/Evangelism: 

6. Teaching methods that stimulate thinking/discussion: 








NATIONAL 




5 4 3 2 
5 4 3 2 
5 4 3 2 


1 
1 

1 


A B C D 
A B C D 
A B C D 
A B C D 
A B C D 
A B C D 


F 

F 
F 
F 
F 

F 



Good Resource for Parents 

Classes, notebooks, and cassettes are 
available for parents from Growing 
Families International, a ministry of John 
MacArthur's church. The Growing Kids 
God's Way series includes: 

Preparation for Parenting (birth 
to 12 months) 

Preparing for the Toddler Years 
(6 months to 1 8 months) 
Growing Kids God's Way (18 
months and older) 
Contact Growing Families International 
at: P.O. Box 8073, Northridge, CA 
91327. Tel: (818) 772-6264. 



Children's Ministry Ideas 

ENCOURAGE all children to bring a Bible to 

class and use it. For pre-schoolers, even holding 

their Bible is important. 

TEACH from an open Bible, not a curriculum 

manual. 

USE time-lines depicting Bible events as helpful 

tools for establishing chronology. 

CONDUCT "Bible drills" to help children learn 

the books of the Bible. 

INTRODUCE curriculum by the time a child is 

one year old. Teaching begins in the nursery. 

HAVE a special Children's Sunday in your 

church. CE National has bulletin insert masters, a 

slide-tape, and ideas for that special day. 



Does Your Teaching Lead to a Decision? 

Teach your Sunday School class/ABF with a goal to change attenders, not merely to impart 
knowledge. Giving specific applications to the lesson should lead to some kind of decision on 
the part of the listener. Also, give the opportunity for accountability through an invitation 
which encourages each listener to: 

1 . Write how he'll change this week and then turn in the card ; 

2. Look up until you see him; 

3. Pray in a small group at the conclusion of the class; 

4. Pray at the front and then return to his seat; 

5. Raise his hand; 

6. See the teacher (or pastor) in a special room after church; 

7. Write on paper (minus the name) an area of his life he'll give to God and place the paper 
at the foot of a wooden cross or in an offering basket; or 

8. Make a commitment in a variety of areas (ie: Christian career, family devotions, sharing 
his faith this week, membership, giving up a stubborn habit, etc.) 

Are you prepared with materials for follow-up on rededication decisions? 



April, 1994 



FOLLOWING IN THE 

FIRST CHRISTIANS' 

FOOTSTEPS 

How much should we imitate the worship practices of the early church? 

RALPH P. MARTIN 



Many worship prac- 
tices that meet us 
in the pages of the 
New Testament 
and early Christianity are tantalizingly 
obscure: Why were Christians being 
baptized for the dead? Why were 
women required to wear coverings on 
their heads? Why did believers wash 
one another' s feet? 

What do we make today of these 
and other practices? Should we con- 
tinue them? 

Many are clearly mandated, or 
fully described and valued, in the New 
Testament. Yet we find many of them 
difficult to fit into our contemporary 
worship. 

Sometimes our problem is lack of 
knowledge. Much description of wor- 
ship in the New Testament gives the 
impression that worship practices were 
developed ad /joc-occasioned by the 
needs of the hour. Sometimes we do 
not know the intended significance of 
various worship settings and occa- 
sions. 

But often we can read the texts 
only too clearly. The question is, what 
principle is being illustrated and en- 
forced? So we continue genuinely to 
puzzle over why early Christians prac- 
ticed certain rites-and whether and 
how we should follow their lead. 

Washing feet 

We might take as a helpful case 



study the practice of foot washing. 
The practice is prescribed in the new 
Testament and was observed in the 
early Christian communities. Yet it 
has been both practiced and neglected 
by churches in our day. Should foot 
washing be part of our worship? 

The New Testament support for 
foot washing is found in John 13:4-5, 
12-15: [Jesus] got up from the meal, 
took off his outer clothing, and 
wrapped a towel around his waist. 
After that, he poured water into a 
basin and began to wash his disciples ' 
feet, drying them with the towel that 
was wrapped around him. . . 

When he had finished washing 
their feet, he put on his clothes and 
returned to his place. "Do you under- 
stand what I have done for you? " he 
asked them. "You call me 'Teacher' 
and 'Lord, ' and rightly so, for that is 
what I am. Now that I, your Lord and 
Teacher, have washed your feet, you 
also should wash one another 'sfeet. 1 
have set you an example that you 
should do as I have done for you. " 

Washing the disciples' feet re- 
flects a civilization that knew only 
unpaved roads, open-toed sandals or 
bare feet, and a hot climate to tax the 
weary traveler. Bathing feet was a 
mark of hospitality for visitors in both 
Israel and Greco-Roman society (Luke 
7:44; I Tim 5: 10). 

Early Christians preserved die 
practice as part of baptism or even as 



the manner of baptism itself . Ambrose, 
bishop of Milan (about a.d. 380), 
taught that just as a person' s sins were 
washed away in baptism, so foot wash- 
ing removed the hereditary sins from 
Adam. The Roman Catholic church 
(with other liturgical churches) has 
preserved foot washing, with modi- 
fied meaning, in its observance of 
Maundy Thursday. 

Though Protestants reject a sac- 
ramental reasoning, foot washing has 
continued among German Pietist 
groups and Anabaptist denominations 
like the Church of the Brethren, as 
well as some Adventist, Holiness, and 
Pentecostal churches. These take their 
stand on the plain directive of the 
Lord: "I have given you an example, 
that you also should do as I have done 
to you." Foot washing to them is both 
obedience and a lesson in humility. 

What is puzzling, diough, is not 
that many Christians continue this 
practice but that it has never become 
as prominent in the church as has 
Communion. Foot washing is com- 
manded by the Lord, perhaps even 
more strongly than is Communion. 
On grounds of logic and clarity the 
case is apparenUy irrefutable. Why 
then do die majority of Christians 
observe the command to break bread 
and take die cup in die Supper, yet 
regard die foot-washing directive as 
nonbinding? 

cntimied on page 9 



cHEfiALD 



Cultural background 

First, there is a unique cultural 
setting to the foot-washing ceremony- 
our feet do not get soiled and stained 
in modern road conditions. The same 
does not hold for Eucharist, since tak- 
ing bread and wine, or eating and 
drinking, are universal across cultures . 
For some , the bread and cup are dubbed 
"elements" because they are elemen- 
tal to all life. 

Second, many believe that what 
Jesus intended by "example" signi- 
fies for later disciples more than water 
ablutions in a church service. He was 
dramatically symbolizing the spirit 
that prompted such an act, namely a 
disposition to serve those who need 
assistance. They would equate Jesus' 
command to wash one another's feet 
with Paul ' s words about showing kind- 
ness to others with cheerfulness (Rom. 
12:8) and performing "humble duties 
for fellow Christians" (I Tim. 5: 10, 
gnb). 

We may cull from the New Tes- 
tament various puzzling practices. 
Many carry an element of prescrip- 
tion; New Testament texts indicate 
they should or must be done. And in 
each one there are vital issues at stake. 

At the same time, for each prac- 
tice there is a cultural background that 
needs to be respected. The directives 
were particularly necessary and intel- 
ligible in that age when the church 
was launched. 

Today , churches will debate when 
and how such practices should be ob- 
served. Some Christians will follow 
the form of early worship practices; 
others will seek a universal underly- 
ing meaning. In either approach, the 
principles remain and are as valid and 
obligatory as ever. 



Dr. Ralph P. Martin is professor of bibli- 
cal studies at the University of Sheffield in 
England and author of Worship in the 
Early Church (Eerdmans, 1974). 

Reprinted by permission 
Dr. Ralph P. Martin 



The Master's 
Art Work 

By Davy Troxel 



The year is 1492. As Columbus lands in the West Indies and thinks 
he's in Bombay, a little part-time painter climbs up and down 
on a scaffold in Milan, Italy, dabbling here and there on a 
church wall with artist's brushes and paint made with egg tempera and 
mastic. His work is part of an urban renew a] project ordered by the Duke 
of Milan. But no sooner does the painter finish his work than the Duke' s 
wife dies, and the church is closed to be turned into a mausoleum for his 
wife and later, a child. 

Some years later, the building is reopened to the church, only to be 
used as a torture chamber by Catholic priests, trying to extract confes- 
sions out of their Protestant victims. 

As the Inquisition came to an end, the blood stains were washed 
away and the building was turned into a school. The room with the 
wonderfully painted wall became a dining room, and a door was 
smashed through that wall into the kitchen. 

The invasion of Napoleon in the 1790's turned that room into a 
stable for the general's horses, and the 300 year old painting was soon 
stained by the sweat, dung, and mildew of animals. 

In 1834, someone gave the entire room a facelift, and painted over 
the old wall. They did it again in 1836. Finally, in 1935, a third layer of 
paint was sloshed over the old picture, and every trace of the original 
decorating job was obliterated. 

War came again in 1943, and although allied bombers did what 
they could to spare civilians, still the little church took a direct hit, and 
was reduced to a pile of rubble. Only the cross protruded from tire mess 
of timbers and brick. 

But as the congregation came to their little church and began to 
rebuild, they found that the debris has fallen in so as to protect one wall: 
the only wall left standing. And more than just the wall was left. You 
see, the war that brought the A-bomb also gave us the electronic 
microscope, and the ability to see what's under layers of paint. Before 
long, after months of work with razor blades and solvent, the original 
artwork of 500 years before was uncovered and restored once more for 
generations to enjoy. 

What is that painting that lasted through 500 years of blood stains, 
kitchen grease, animal desecration, war, and careless attempts to cover 
up the beautiful work? What is on that wall that had the door smashed 
through it, and every other wall brought down around it? Well, that 
painting is none other than the picture that has been reproduced more 
than any other in the world: Leonardo da Vinci's famous work - The 
Last Supper! 



April, 1994 



SPORTS 



Pele: A Tribute 

Years after he retired from the game, Pele continues to be the sport's top spokesperson 
By Dave Branon 




FOCUS ON SPORTS 



▲ Here to help When Pele came to the United States to play soccer in 
the 70s, money was not his motivating force "People think I cam to 
America for the money," he says. "But I was aware that every place in 
the world except America plays soccer Maybe I can help " 



he protested 
that the Bra- 
zilian fed- 
eration and 
R i c a r d o 
Teixeira(the 
federation's 
president) 
were guilty 
of corrup- 
tion. Pele 
felt that he 
was not 
given the 
rights be- 
cause he re- 
fused to of- 
fer bribes. 

Here's 
where the 
plot thick- 
ens Teixeira 
istheson-in- 



The man who almost single-handedly 
attracted sports fans in the United States to 
soccer two decades ago is still recognized 
around the world as the greatest to ever 
play the game. Yet on the day of final 
selections for World Cup play in the sum- 
mer of 1994, the great Pele was persona 
non grata. 

Last December, when FIFA con- 
vened in Las Vegas to conduct the draw 
for the World Cup, the most popular soc- 
cer player in the world was sit- 
ting in the audience, not stand- 
ing on the platform. While 
Robin Williams entertained and 
Faye Dunaway added her 
charm, the person who should 
have been basking in the spot- 
light at Caesar's Palace was just 
another spectator. 

Sadly, the reasons have 
nothing to do with soccer and 
everything to do with politics. 
It seems that Pele's sports mar- 
keting company had bid for tele- 
vision rights to air Brazil 's na- 
tional championships. When 
Pele failed to win those rights. 



law of Jose Havelange, the president of 
FIFA, the group putting together the World 
Cup and its draw. When Pele was denied 
a role in the draw, it was thought by many 
that there was only one reason: the Brazil- 
ian TV rights problem. 

What FIFA missed by shunning Pele 
was the opportunity to recapture some of 
the excitement of the early seventies when 
Pele came to the United States and helped 
popularize soccer. As a member of the 



Peerless Pele 



♦ Born October 23, 1 940, in Tres CoracOes, Brazil ♦ Given name: 
Edson Arantes do Nascimento (The name Pele came when he was 9, 
playing in the streets, when another boy started yelling, "Pele! Pele!" "I 
asked him what it meant," Pele recalls, "but he didn't know") ♦ Height: 
5'8" ♦ Weight: 1 60 pounds ♦ First professional soccer: At age 1 5, 
Pele played lor Santos in Brazil's Division I ♦ World Cup Wins: In 
1958, 1962, and 1970, Brazil won the World Cup with Pele on the team 

♦ Goafe scred: 1 ,281 in 1 ,363 games ♦ 1000th goal: November 20, 
1 969 in his 909th first-class match ♦ United States experience: Played 
lor 272 years for New York cosmos (1975-1978); his contract called lor 
him to receive $7 million ^Awards: 1 978: International Peace Award; 
1 980: athlete of the Century ♦ Other interest: Composed the entire 
soundtrack for the film Pele, which was released in 1977. 



Cosmos in the North American Soccer 
League, Pele created unprecedented ex- 
citement for the game. Somewhat like 
Michael Jordan did in basketball, Pele 
brought people to the game, caused them 
to talk about it, and left them shaking their 
heads in amazement 

Beyond that, Pele has become, since 
his retirement, an admirable goodwill 
ambassador for soccer. In an age when 
many athletes are afraid of the role model 
label, Pele wears it with pride. He doesn't 
dnnk. He doesn't smoke. He doesn't do 
drugs. As a kid who rose from poverty in 
Brazil to the top of his profession, he helps 
kids see that they too can succeed. 

Part of what makes Pele great is his 
attitude. Unlike so many athletes whose 
joy in victory can be made less enjoyable 
from the fan's point of view because of 
arrogance and braggadocio, Pele exuded a 
confidence tempered by humility. You 
can see it in this quote from the book 
Soccer, The World Game, which was writ- 
ten at the end of Pele's career 

"I feel the greatest skill I have on the 
field is the ability to make something out 
of nothing. Of course, you need balance 
and speed of body and mind, and strength. 
But there is something else, something 
God has given me, maybe some extra 
instinct for the game. Sometimes I take the 
ball and no one can foresee any danger, 
and then in 2 or 3 seconds there's a goal 
This does not make me proud. 
It makes me humble because 
this is talent God gave me. All 
I can do is work to use it well, 
to make a good life for my 
family, and to give pleasure to 
the people. Aside from any- 
thing I do, there is always the 
Finger of God. He made me a 
soccer player. " 

The world of soccer needs 
more men of courage and clear 
thinking like Pele, who turned 
out to be not just a great soccer 
player but also a gentleman. 



Reprinted by permission ol Sports Spectrum 
For information on Sports Spectrum Magazine call 1 -800-653-8333 



10 



cHEtyLD 




What's Cookin' at 
GBC Longview, Texas? 

Dr. John Mayes, Pastor 

What's cooking at the Grace Brethren Church of Longview, Texas? Could be 
any number of things. From oven-baked chicken to Mexican Casserole, the 

youth of the church have done it all while working their way to Brethren National 

Youth Conference. About every six weeks for the past three years, the young people 

of the church have transformed Sunday School rooms into the "All Saint's Cafe" 

immediately following the Sunday morning worship service. This full service restaurant was appropriately named by the young people 

for all the "saints" who faithfully support this youth fund raiser. The youth take turns 
filling many jobs-from Maitre D' to waiting tables and serving coffee. One thing is for 
sure, there are always plenty of dishes to wash. The support of the church family has 
been tremendous. Not only has this been a successful method for defraying the cost 
of youth and the adults of the church to become better acquainted! Youth Pastor 
Richard Mayes feels that in addition to the money raised, it has given another 
opportunity for church-wide fellowship. This year the church will send approximately 
20 young people to the conference in Lynchburg, but the kids aren't worried-Brethren 
like to eat. And, after all, where else can you get good food, great service, Christian 
fellowship, and an eternal investment in the lives of young people-all for only $5.00? 




The story about Traveler 
and how he kept traveling 

by Dr. Donald E. Wildmon 

Let me tell you a story. Once upon a time there was a 
traveler who had a map. It was a good map. He could use 
that map to get where he wanted to go even in territory not 
familiar to him. In any kind of weather, in any kind of 
conditions, that map would never change. It could always 
be trusted to be true. Traveler followed that map religiously 
when he traveled. 

One day he wanted to go to a certain place. But as he 
traveled he found that the road was rough. It wasn' t smooth 
and easy like the interstate. This really didn't set well with 
Traveler, so he got his map out again. Surely there was an 
easier road which would lead him to his destination. But, 
also, as he searched he could find no other road on the map. 

So he did what any experienced traveler would do. He 
picked out a road which headed in the general direction and 
started down it. But the more he followed that road, the 
more he began to turn in another direction. 

Along the way he stopped to ask questions, to make 
sure he was headed in the right direction. Seeing a man by 
the road, he stopped and inquired of him. Traveler told him 
where he wanted to go. "Sure," the man said, "this road will 
get you there. Just keep following it." 

"But," replied Traveler, "have you ever been there by 
following this road?" 

"Well, no, but I know it will get you there. Others, very 
intelligent people, have told me so," responded the man. 

"What about going back to the main road following my 



map again?" Traveler asked. 

"Your map is old and worn out. It can't lead you to 
where you want to go. Only ignorant people still use that 
map. Enlightened people ignore the worn out directions it 
gives," said the man, obviously very educated and experi- 
enced. 

Well, Traveler kept traveling down the road, even 
though it seemed that he might not be headed to where he 
wanted to go. Finally, deciding that it might be time to 
return to the main road and follow his map, he saw a group. 
He stopped and asked them if the road he was on would get 
him where he wanted to go. "Sure, just keep following the 
road and you will get there," one in the group said. "But 
have any of you ever followed this road to make sure it will 
get me where I want to go?" he asked. 

"Well, no, but we all know that if you will follow this 
road, you can get to where you want to go," came the reply. 

Upset, Traveler told the crowd that he was going back 
to where he left the main road and begin using his map 
again. Upon hearing these words, the group began to berate 
Traveler for disagreeing with their wisdom. They called 
him such terms as stupid, uneducated, rightwinger, bigot, 
homophobe, fundamentalist, even censor. Now Traveler 
was so upset with this criticism that he ignored his instincts 
to return and use the map which had served him faithfully 
for many years. Traveler decided that to avoid the criticism 
and public humiliation he had best continue down the road 
he was traveling, which he did and continues to do to this 
day. And he still hasn't arrived. In fact, the farther he travels 
without his map, the farther he gets away from where he 
wanted to go. 

Now, let me tell you another story. Once upon a time 
there was a church which had a Bible. . . 

Reprinted by permission American Family Association Journal 



April, 1994 



11 



WOMEN'S MINISTRIES 



Jl faithful Woman 



Originally, God gave 
Adam a job to do 
then let him wal- 
low in it before giving him a 
suitable helper. The nature of 
the help rendered by Eve is un- 
clear. God did not tell us the 
specifics of Eve's ministry, and 
we can be glad for that, for even 
within the gender roles He es- 
tablished, there is great opportu- 
nity for diversity and richness in 
serving Him. The woman of this 
month's feature did not want to 
be a pastor's wife because of the 
stereotypical expectations placed 
upon the "first lady" of the 
church. 

Kitty Stroede doesn't play 
piano, nor is she the natural leader 
of the WMC. But she is a faithful 
servant in her own rite. Kitty 
shows her faithfulness in three 
areas (how Brethren!): 
Children's Ministries, Crisis 
Pregnancy Counseling, Caring 
for her Family. 

Children's Ministries 

Kitty is not interested in be- 
ing among the movers and shak- 
ers. She has a tremendous bur- 
den to help others. Consequently, 
when the adults are enjoying 
some of the excellent teaching 
our assembly has to offer, she 
can be found in the basement 



singing with the children or 
teaching them in Sunday School. 
Her particular interest is with the 
challenging years of fifth and 
sixth grades, especially the child 
who is the misfit, runt or outcast. 
She is able to find and bring out 
the best in such children. One 
such child at a previous church 
was John. He was from an abu- 
sive, low-income household and 
was mentally impaired as well. 
Most were disgusted by John's 
lack of hygiene and generally 
poor deportment, but Kitty 
showed him some of the only 
tolerance and love he may ever 
know. 

Crisis Pregnancy Counseling 

Both a creative outlet and a 
passion for Kitty is her work as a 
counselor at the Bowling Green 
Pregnancy Center. She's not the 
type to chain herself to the doors 
of an abortion clinic. Her style is 
more behind the scenes, one cli- 
ent at a time. She volunteers for 
a 3 1/2 hour shift each Monday 
and is exhilarated by the experi- 
ence. It's not just that she gets 
out of the house for a while, or is 
able to get in touch with a differ- 
ent type of person: she is able to 
help women in crisis do some- 
thing positive for the cause of 
the unborn. 



Caring for Family 

By far, the most important 
ministry Kitty is committed to is 
her family. In addition to using 
her home as an able platform for 
ministry, she home-school's her 
children (Phoebe-6'/2, Fozzie-5 
and Harold-3) and provides a 
base for the ministry of her hus- 
band (Oscar-34). Such commit- 
ment has been a model for other 
women within and outside the 
GBC in Bowling Green. 

Kitty is not a pastor's wife. 
She is a woman, committed to 
ministry inside and outside the 
home who happens to be mar- 
ried to a pastor. As such, she 
stands as a model of the unique- 
ness with which God assigns His 
saints to serve Him. 




Kitty Stroede is married to 

Oscar Stroede, Pastor of 

Bowling Green, Ohio GBC. 



12 



C HEI^LD 



INTERNATIONAL 

U.S.A. 

Training a New Type 
of Missionary 



What would you say if your pastor talked to you about 
becoming atoreign missionary? 

- "I don't have the language skills"? 

- "I wouldn't be able to leave my family and friends 
behind'"? 

- "I don't think I can adjust, living in another culture"? 

- "It's just too expensive to be a career missionary"? 
What if, after hearing your answer, your pastor said: "I 

am talking about a kind of foreign missionary who would not 
have to be concerned with raising support, adjusting to a new 
culture, learning a new language, or leaving the family 
behind." Would you still say you couldn't do it? 

Now, that is the profile of a new type of missionary in this 
country: Christians who, out of their own home or church, are 
reaching the internationals who come to live and/or study 
here This is already being called "Backyard foreign mis- 
sions". 

But, just how big is this "backyard"? 

THE NEED FOR THIS MINISTRY IS GREAT. There are 
over 400,000 international students alone in the United 
States. There are also immigrants and refugees who come 
to live here, over 1 million every year. In fact, this phenom- 
enon is so staggering that TIME magazine, in a recent cover 
story called this: "The New Face of America: How Immi- 
grants are Shaping the World's First Multicultural Society". 

The United States has the fourth largest Spanish- 
speaking culture in the world, the second largest Polish city, 
the largest Jewish population, the second largest Puerto 
Rican city, the second largest Hispanic population center, 
and some of the largest Haitian, Cuban, Dominican, and 
Guatemalan cities in the world. 

Do you think God sent these people here only to allow 
them to have a chance to drive better cars, attend outstand- 
ing schools, or day-dream about becoming rich? 

THE BASIS FOR THIS MINISTRY IS BIBLICAL. Ac- 
cording to Scriptures, God's heart reaches out for 
internationals. In the Old Testament God specifically com- 
manded the people of Israel to "treat the alien living with you 
as one of your native-born. Love him as yourself" (Lev. 
19:34). In the New Testament we hear of the "God-fearing 
Gentiles". In fact, God sent Philip especially to one such 
man, an Ethiopian, who needed to understand Scriptures 
fully (Acts 8:26-40). 

When Paul was in Athens, he made this amazing 



statement, speaking of the only True God: "from one man he 
made very nation of men, that they should inhabit the whole 
earth; and he determined the times set for them and the exact 
places where they should live." God is in control of the 
movements of people around the world! And what is his 
intent in doing it? "God did this so that men would seek him 
and perhaps reach out for him and find you just might be the 
only "Philip" he or she will ever know in this country God 
wants him or her to hear the true message through you 
You say, I want to do it, but how can I get started? 

THE REALITY OF THIS MINISTRY IS FORTHCOM- 
ING. Our churches are finally awakening to their responsibil- 
ity, under God, with respect to internationals 
INTERNATIONALS U.S.A., a ministry started by Wooster 
GBC, all located in Ohio, was officially launched on Decem- 
ber 16, 1993, with the arrival of Ivanildo Trindade, the 
Director of INTERNATIONALS U.S.A., on the field Ivanildo 
is a graduate of Grace Theological Seminary and has had 
much experience both as a pastor and teacher in Brazil. He 
is residing with his family in the Wooster area. 

This ministry is receiving advice and counsel from both 
Grace Brethren Foreign Missions and Grace Brethren Home 
Missions Council, and it involves churches in two districts in 
Ohio. The goal of INTERNATIONALS U.S.A. is to equip the 
local church to minister to internationals. Our dream is to see 
many of these students return to their home countries not 
only better educated but forever changed, once they accept 
Christ as their Savior. Thus we can foresee the beginning of 
churches around the world, through the testimony of these 
students. Those who choose to remain here can also be 
instrumental in reaching ethnic groups in the United States 

Even if your pastor is not yet talking to you about 
becoming this type of missionary, you can still be involved by 
praying: 

-That God will give us great wisdom in planning the 
beginning stages of this ministry 

- That God will give us many prayer warriors on behalf 
of this ministry 

- That God will lead us to internationals who will be 
interested in spiritual things. 

- That God will raise up key people in each participating 
church whose hearts will be burdened for the salvation of 
internationals. 

- That God will provide for the financial needs of this 
ministry. 

You may also write or call to receive the 
INTERNATIONALS U.S.A. newsletter and/or to request to 
become one of the prayer warriors for this ministry 

You may also contribute financially to this ministry. As 
you can imagine, a work in the beginning stages such as this 
has many special needs. The Holy Spirit may prompt your 
heart to make it possible for us to reach those people God 
himself is sending to us. 

Please send letters and contributions to: 
INTERNATIONALS U.S.A., 1924 BURBANK RD., 
WOOSTER, OH 44691. PHONE: (216) 264-9459. 



April, 1994 



13 



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970* 

960- 

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hool prayer and the decline of America 

SAT Total Scores 1952-86 












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Almighty trod, we acknowledge our 
dependence upon Thee, and we beg 
Thy blessings upon us, our parents, 
our teachers and our Country. 

Could removing this simple prayer 
from schools really have affected 
our country so profoundly? In 
America: To Pray or not To Pray, 
author David Barton uses govern- 
ment statistics to show that 1963- 
the year prayer was prohibited in 
schools-was the year that the de- 
cline started in youth, education, 

' families and the nation. The chart 
here is just one of many shocking 
statistical proofs. The book is avail- 
able for $6.95, plus shipping from 
Wall Builders, Inc. P.O. Box 397, 
Aledo, Texas 76008, phone, 817- 
441-6044 (Texas residents add 
7.75% sales tax.) 

6 








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Abortion death watch 




a braham Lincoln once told of a 
/I farmer trying to teach his son 

J. JL how to plow a straight furrow. In 
the time-honor ed tradition, he told the boy to 
keep his eyes on some object at the other end 
of the field and plow straight for it. The boy 
star ted plowing and the farmer went about his 
chores. When he returned after several hours 
to check on the boy's progress, he was shocked 
to find instead of straight rows something that 
looked like a question mark. The boy had 
obeyed his father's instructions. He had fixed 
his eyes on something at the other side of the 
field-a cow. Unfortunately the cow had moved! 

Evidently, that father forgot to tell his son to 
look for a stable object, one that wouldn't shift or 
move around. That's one mistake we don't have to 
make. We can fix our eyes on Jesus who never 
changes. 




• Every day in the U.S. 4,400 
babies are killed by abortion. 

• 1,600,000 babies are killed 
every year. 

•31 ,000,000 have been slaugh- 
tered since abortion-on-demand 
was legalized by the Supreme 
Court in 1973. 

• 30% of all babies conceived in 
this country are killed before they 
ever see the light of day. 













14 



C HE8^LD 



GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH 

Celebrates "50th" 



With a banner across Main Street, a banquet on 
the Queen Mary and two Sundays of great services, 
Grace Community Church of Seal Beach, California, 
celebrated its 50th anniversary on February 6 and 13. 

February 6 was also the 10th Anniversary of 
Pastor Donald Shoemaker's ministry at the church. 
He was honored with a commemorative crystal etch- 
ing, a "get-away" weekend, and an evening of appre- 
ciation on February 20. 

Former Pastor Roy Roberts spoke to the congre- 
gation and many former members who visited on 




♦ Six pastors of the church attended the banquet on the 
Queen Mary. Pictured from left: Roy Roberts (1971-79), Bob 
Kliewer (1970-71), Donald Shoemaker (1984-present), Burton 
Hatch (1949-53), Mike Ryan (1979-83) and George Peek 
(1944-48). Words of greeting were received from John Gillis 
(1958-66). 



February 13. The evening banquet was on the Queen 
Mary in Long Beach harbor. The church's first pastor, 
George Peek, was featured speaker. 

Beginning as a Bible study led by Ralph Colburn, 
"First Brethren Church" was organized in Seal Beach 
in the early 1940's. Seven lots near the ocean (now 
valued at well over a million dollars) were purchased 
for $1 7,500 and the first facility was dedicated in 1 947. 



r 


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♦ Senior Pastor 
Donald Shoemaker 
was recognized for 
10 years of service in 
the February 6 
morning services by 
Elder Board 
Chairman Don 
Evans. 



Membership grew rapidly in the 1 970's and a second 
facility was added in 1 981 . In 1 985, the church changed 
its name to "Grace Community Church". 

Currently the church has 300 members, attracts 
many young adults and holds two services, both of 
which are casual. The church offers many local min- 
istries including a counseling program guided by 
trained laypeople and has a large missions budget. Its 
staff and Elders have worked hard to lay extensive 
plans for ministries and outreach for the coming 
decade. 




April, 1994 



15 



HIS EYE IS M THE SPARROW!" 




By Dr. Bob Divine, Pastor 
Middlebranch, Ohio Grace Brethren Chruch 



Around our house, we have fifteen bird 
feeders. It is quite possible in a weeks 
time to spend as much money on bird 
food (we mix our own or course) as we do for our own 
food. We have to buy just the right kind of sun-flower 
seeds (not too big, not too small, oiled), mullet, and 
cracked corn. We take these and mix them all to- 
gether. It makes for a wonderful bird feed. We do this 
so we can watch the birds, sometimes hundreds of 
them. We have a list of all the wonderful birds that 
have come by, fifteen different species or more by 
now. It is interesting that as we watch them, we never 
ever exclaim at our house, "Oh come to the window 
quick; look at the sparrows that are here!" The spar- 
rows are always here, day and night. They never 
seem to go away. Some birds feed in the morning 
some in the morning and afternoon; but the sparrows 
seem to be feeding all the time. 

The Scripture does make mention of the sparrows 
in Luke 12:6: "Are not five sparrows sold for two 
farthings, and not one of them is forgotten before 
God?" A sparrow was so cheap, that two were sold for 
one cent (Matthew 10:29), and a fifth one was thrown 
in for the price of a fourth. Yet the infinite God is 
concerned for each one. What is this text telling us? 
The fifth one that was thrown in for free-even God 
takes note! Why would God use an example of a 
sparrow? Why not a dove? How about a flicker? They 
are so beautiful. How about a red-headed wood- 
pecker? They've all come to visit us. A red-winged 
black bird, which is quite aggressive and not as 
desirable to have hang around your house once they 
are there. They chase the other birds off until they're 
done feeding. But, why a sparrow? Probably the 
reason is because the sparrow is so insignificant to us. 
They just seem to be everywhere. You would not want 
to buy one in the first place. If you did buy one, you 
could buy two for a penny; you could not buy just one. 
The Lord is trying to teach us (in Luke 12:6) how much 
He cares about the minute of things, the things that 
matter little to us; the fifth sparrow thrown in for free 
just to make a deal. That free sparrow, that worthless 
sparrow, is worth something to God. He sees it as it 
falls to the ground. He is conscious of where it is. 



A God who is conscious of such insignificant 
things as a sparrow is conscious of the significant 
things in my life. As I contemplate and meditate on this 
text, i am encouraged to know that my problems are 
not too small for Him. He is aware of them, even the 
smallest of problems, and He notices how they come 
down. What happens to them. What happens to me. 
He takes note. In Luke 12:7, he says: "Even the very 
hairs of your head are numbered." Who would bother 
to do that? For some of us, it would not be such a big 
problem. I have a dear friend in North Carolina who 
had only three or four strands of hair. He would comb 
them cross his head, so he would not look totally bald ! 
He could probably count his hairs, but others could 
not. They are all numbered by our Lord. He knows 
when they fall. He continues in verse 7 to say, "Fear 
not therefore: ye are of more value than many spar- 
rows." Whatever is going on in your life, it matters to 
the Saviour. He is conscious of it. Even if your hair is 
falling out ! He knows that. And it is of a concern to Him. 

Peter tells us in his epistles to "cast all our cares 
upon him;" that is, on the Lord. The things that matter 
to us, matter to Him. Have you been doing enough 
casting? Or have you been doing a lot of carrying of 
your cares? Cast your cares upon Him. Let Him bear 
your burdens. Let Him work out your problems. I have 
seen in my ministry-too often-that we pray for situa- 
tions for God to resolve, and when He works-we jump 
in the way and try to interfere. We try to take away the 
discipline, so it is not so severe on the sinning brother 
or the sinning sister. We try to interfere with God's 
work. But it says, "cast" those cares upon Him; those 
problems that are weighing you down the most, even 
the one that is weighing you down the least. All of 
these problems matter to our Lord. Take them to the 
Lord, the song-writer said, and leave them there. We 
are not invited to come back to the altar and pick them 
up again and bear them for a little bit. If we do no/trust 
God with our problems, what we really are saying is 
that we cannot trust God. He really will not be able to 
work them out. We need to help Him, for fear He might 
do it wrong. Take those problems this day and "cast" 
them upon the Lord! Have faith in Him! "His eye is on 
the sparrow, and I know He watches me!" 



16 



C HEI^LD 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



Ron Thompson of the Board of Brethren Evangelistic 
Ministries rejoices in the Lord and wishes to express appre- 
ciation to the fellowship for the excellent response to the 
letter sent out by Lee Dice alerting the fellowship to the need 
of funds by B.E.M. To date over $5500 has been received. 
Anyone who has contributed $25.00 or more will soon be 
receiving a cassette tape of Brother Ron at the piano key 
board entitled "Just Ron Again " Any who desires to contrib- 
ute to the ministry of B.E.M. can do so by sending the 
donation to B.E.M., Box 33, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Praise the Lord we now have a Brethren work in Cambo- 
dia but the cry now is "Why Not Vietnam?" Many Ameri- 
cans went to this country as soldiers of the U.S. military 
Wouldn't it be wonderful to see some return as soldiers of 
Jesus Christ? 

If you are a veteran of the Vietnam war and attending a 
Grace Brethren Church, and would be interested in seeing 
a Brethren work in Vietnam. . . would you please, as soon as 
possible: List: Your name, the branch of service you were in, 
the year you served in Vietnam, any other information you 
would like to share Send it to: Pastor Dave Mitchell, Waipio 
Grace Brethren Church (Why-pi-o), 95-035 Waimakua Drive 
(Why-ma-ku-ah), Mililani, Hawaii 96789 (Mill-la-lani). 

The purpose of this survey is to see if there is an interest 
in our Fellowship to see a church or churches planted, and 
if so those who respond will be kept up to date. Also there 
may be a chance of forming a FGBC Vietnam veteran group 
which could be involved in some form of ministry and 
fellowship. 



QUESTION: How many young people across North 
America made first time decisions for Christ after hearing 
the gospel from a friend at 1 993's " See You at the Party?" 

ANSWER: 85,000! That's the equivalent of the entire 
population of Boulder, Colorado becoming saved in one 
evening! Almost 200 of these decisions were a result of our 
Grace Brethren Churches' youth inviting their unsaved 
friends to the event! 

For those unfamiliar with "See You at the Party," it is both 
a local and nationwide outreach event designed to chal- 
lenge young people, through peer evangelism, to make a 
commitment to Christ Local, youth invited their non-saved 
friends to an outreach "party " Then, over 70 denominations 
and youth organizations work in cooperation to simulta- 
neously link an estimated 50,000 local outreach "parties" in 
a"live-by-satelite national broadcast. 

March 5, 1 994 is the date set for the second annual "See 
You at the Party." 

At the GBC of Waldorf, Maryland Barry Clay Goodson 
was ordained into the Christian ministry on Sunday , the 
sixth of March, 1994 at 3:00 in the afternoon. Barry is a staff 
member at Waldorf Pray for this fine young man's ministry. 
Jeff Thornley is the Senior Pastor there. 

Community GBC, Goldendale, WA celebrated a mort- 
gage burning on February 27, 1994 and are anticipating, 
with the Lord's blessing, to break ground for an 8200 square 



foot classroom addition on March 14. Greg Howell is the 
pastor 

A "California Care" mailing and bulletin insert has gone to 
all pastors calling for prayer and financial support for those 
in our Fellowship hit by the earthquake. If you would like to 
financially help our California brothers please send a tax- 
deductible contribution clearly marked "California Care" to 
CE National, P.O. Box 365, Winona Lake, Indiana 46590. 

There will be a Good Friday Rally at the University of 
Michigan Christian students at the University are organiz- 
ing a rally in remembrance of the death and resurrection of 
our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. The rally will be a time of 
reflection, worship, praise and fellowship with our Lord. As 
Christian students at a secular University with a large 
Jewish population, we are praying this rally will glorify our 
King, by bringing praise to His name and impacting the 
hearts of the unbelievers. 

The Good Friday Rally will officially begin at 1 1 a.m. on 
April 1 , 1 994, rain or shine It will be held on the Diag in the 
center of campus at the University of Michigan At 2 p.m. 
there will be a procession with a large wooden cross to 
Palmer Field where the rally will continue. At the rally we will 
have speakers reflecting on the true meaning of Good 
Friday and sharing the glorious gospel, personal testimo- 
nies and a time of worship, allowing all of us to sing our 
praise to our Lord. We are currently aware of people 
traveling across the country to attend the Good Friday Rally, 
and are praying for thousands more to join us If you have 
any questions please call Dan McPherson at (313) 994- 
5148. 

Ivanildo Trindade from Brazil and his family are now 
residing in Wooster, Ohio. He's director of a new ministry to 
internationals called Internationals USA Five GBC 
churches in Ohio (Wooster, Ashland Grace, Ashland 
Southview, Macedonia, and Fairlawn) are behind this new 
ministry. FMS and BMH are also part of the supporting cast. 
The plan is to eventually develop Internationals U.S.A. 
across the fellowship. For more information call Foreign or 
Home Missions at 219-267-5161. 

Russia update - Paul Michaels is very encouraged with 
the progress in Novosibirsk, Russia Paul, along with ateam 
from CoMission, is in the initial stages of saturation evange- 
lism in two target areas which have no evangelical witness 
If they continue to make contact with people as they have 
thus far, Paul estimates that they could start three churches 
by the end of the year. There is great openness and 
receptivity to the Gospel Paul's strategy is to pour himself 
into Russian Christians, training them to do the church 
planting. He wants to multiply himself and see a number of 
churches planted at the same time, rather than plant one 
church at a time by himself 

And now we wanted to inform you that as of April 4, 1994 
the newsline number will be changed to 21 9-267-7826 The 
news will also be changed every Monday morning by noon 



April, 1994 



17 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



ADDRESS CHANGES: 

Grace Brethren Church 
13000 Zekiah Drive 
Waldorf, MD 20601 

Miss Barb Wooler 
P.O. Box 588 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219)269-4657 

Nathan and Armida (DD) Leigh 
P.O. Box A.C. 527 
Quezon City, 1109 
Philippines 

Dave and Sue Guiles 
new telephone/Fax number 
(011-54)1-259-3384 

Bill Cochran 

4420 Kirkwood Drive 

Lincoln, NE 68516 



DEATH NOTICE: 

Dorothy Helen Maconaghy, 87, went to be with the Lord on March 4, 1 994. 
She was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1928 she married Hill 
Maconaghy, who survives. She was a retired missionary, spending 39 
years in Argentine. She resided at Grace Village this past year. 

Do you like to write? We need more good writers to share some devotionals 
for the Daily Devotions book. The guidelines are: 300-350 words per 
devotional, a title and a Scripture reference. We could use a quantity for 
the July-December issue. Please respond to: Daily Devotions, Brethren 
Missionary Herald Company, P.O. Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590 (Send 
to us by April 20). 

Bodily Discipline Profiteth Little - This should be the title of the article on 
page 12 of the February 15 Brethren Missionary Herald magazine. (It was 
correct on the Table of Contents page). 



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An unknown poet has described what it means to walk with God: 

Begin the day with God, kneel down to Him in prayer; 
Lift up your heart to His abode and seek His love to share. 

Open the Book of God and read a portion there, 

That it may hallow all your thoughts and sweeten all your care. 

Go through the day with God, e'en though you may not see, 

Where e'er you are, at home, abroad, He still is near to thee. 

Converse in mind with God, your spirit heavenward raise; 

Acknowledge every good bestowed and offer grateful praise. 

Conclude your day with God, your sins to Him confess; 

Trust in the Lord's atoning blood and plead His righteousness. 

Lie down at night with God, who gives His servants sleep; 

And when you tread the vale of death, He'll safely guard and keep. 

May we all have that kind of fellowship with God. Then we will know its blessed benefits. 



18 



C HH^LD 



The Brethren Adult series for 
June, July and August 

^PROPHECY Things o 



This study guide by. 
of the major theme: 
you hours of profit* 
Major topics of Bibl< 
terminology and he 




multiple 



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Dr. James Boyer is Professor Emeritus of 
Greek and New Testament at Gmce Theo- 
logical Seminary, Winona Lake, Indiana. 



FREE 



with your Sunday School order- 
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by Andrew Knowles 

(if order total is $100 or more) 



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copies of PROPHECY Things to Corneal $6.95 tack 



□ My order totals $ 1 00 or more. Please send me Real-Life Christianity by Andrew Knowles. 
Ship To: Bill To: 



The Brethren Missionary Herald Co. 

P.O. Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 • Phone (219) 267-7158 
Toil-Free Number for Orders: 1-800-348-2756 



will send you a copy <>l John 
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BRETHREN 

MISSIONARY 

HERALD 

P.O. Box 544 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

1-800-348-2756 



Become a 

HERALD 
RPORATION 

MEMBER 

The cost is low-only $25.00 a year 

•eceive a free year's subscription to the Herald. 

receive a tree copy of The MacArthur New 
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focuses on the major doctrine in each text. 

• You become a voting member of the Herald 
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Your corporation membership begins as soon as your 
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BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

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R E T H R E N 



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S S I O N A R Y 




Volume 56 No. 5 



May, 1994 
$2,00 



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My Good Friend in Christ, 

Where will Steve Green, R.C. Sproul, H.B. London, Bill Bright, Knute and Jeannie Larson, Christine Wyrtzen, Greg Buchanan, and Dan 
Allen be during this year's FGBC National Conference? With us! Join us July 23-28 at the lovely Grenelefe Resort near Orlando, Florida, 
for National Conference designed in every aspect to serve and encourage you and to "Ignite New Vision" for yourself, your family, and 
your church. 

Plan to take your family on a spiritually refreshing vacation this year. We'll hear nationally known speakers who will challenge our 
hearts from the Word of God, dynamic musicians who will lift our spirits to worship God, and warm fellowship with the people of God. 

Your children will enjoy a Children's Conference better than ever before. And best of all, it is provided at no additional cost! 

This year we have streamlined business sessions, so our week can be focused on spiritual challenge and enrichment. 

As you know, there are many attractions for your family to enjoy in Orlando: Walt Disney World, Sea World, and Cypress Gardens 
to name a few. You can take a few days either before or after Conference to visit these places. 

If you've ever thought of going to National Conference before, this is a perfect opportunity for you to be a part of what promises 
to be a great experience. What an experience this event will be for your family. . . a week of great music, great speakers, and great 
fellowship. You'll come back spiritually refreshed, encouraged, and better equipped to serve your church, as you grasp the vision God 
has for you. 

Registration is only $25/single and $45/couple before May 15, 1994. Cost will be $35/single and $60/couple after that date. 

Come prepared to be spiritually challenged and refreshed. I look forward to seeing you at Grenelefe. 



For National Conference reservation and registration information write: 

Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches 

P.O. Box 386 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

or call (219) 267-1269 



Yours because HIS, 
Robert D. Fetterhoff, Moderator 




W 



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imt^LD 



EDITORIAL 



The Women In Mi Life 



by Jeff Carroll 



I really don't know how to confess what I'm 
about to relate to you. I guess it all began at a very 
young age. The sin which I am writing about is 
that of not truly appreciating the value and 
contributions that women have made in my life. 

Of course, I first think of my Mother. When I 
was about 4 years old my Mother took my brother 
and me to church. I liked going but the following 
Sunday I told her that I would probably just stay 
home and play. She said that that was fine, but I'd 
have to stay in my room the entire day. I decided 
that I would go to church. 

At church, my Sunday school teacher was 
Florence Starrett. She was also the church sec- 
retary and had seen a long line of pastors come 
and go. Florence's arms were always open and 
so was her heart. She had no children of her own, 
but her kids were the kids of the Sunday school 
class whom she always addressed as "Honey". 
She infected me with a love for Jesus and His 
church. 

When I became a teenager, I entered the 
youth group. Every Sunday night we met for two 
hours of fun, fellowship and singing under the 
direction of Mildred Kuehner and her daughter- 
in-law, Lydia. We would often do variety shows 
and special concerts and plays. When I would get 
up to read or recite my part in the production, 
Mildred, who stood about 4' 2", would stand at the 
back and yell at me at the top of her lungs, 
"Louder! Slower!" I've often noted that those two 
ladies taught me how to speak as well as serve. 
As Charles Swindoll says, "Three cheers for the 
church!" 

In the ninth grade, I became totally intimi- 
dated by my freshman English teacher. We en- 
tered the classroom Wednesday afternoon and 
she wrote four words on the blackboard : This too 
shall pass. Then she informed us that our theme 



was due Friday on this sentence. Well, I failed the 
first two drafts and had to rewrite my paper three 
times. She was tough, but her motto was, "I'd 
rather you fail in high school than fail in college." 
Some comfort! We weren't sure during her class 
if we would even make it out of high school, let 
alone go to college. I'm anxious to return and let 
her know what I do for a living, but she probably 
wouldn't believe me. 

"What is the Grace Brethren Religion?" Those 
are among the first words that I spoke to my 
future wife, Pam, when we talked at a birthday 
party. I had seen 
people go forward 
and didn't really un- 
derstand what it 
meant to become a 
Christian. She ex- 
plained and several 
weeks later, I under- 
stood and I too, went 
forward. 

I really could not 
complete this story 
about women with- 
out mentioning the 

ladies of Milford, Indiana in the church where I 
pastored while I attended seminary. They met 
every Tuesday morning for prayer and Bible 
study. This they had done for nine years. They 
were the glue of that church and they were the 
only reason that the Holy Spirit had not shut the 
place down. Today, they are still meeting (some 
in Heaven), and the church has expanded and is 
full of new people. 

Who are the women in your life? Who are the 
faithful ones who carry the load? Mother's Day is 
May 8th. Please don't miss an opportunity to 
give honor to whom honor is due. 




May, 1994 



TABLE OP CONTENTS 



BRETHREN 



MISSION 




Volume 56 No 



May. 1994 




3 EDITORIAL 

The Women In My life 



5 WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 
How About the Kids? 




6 Tribute to Mothers 



8 CHURCH FOCUS 

Growing A Church, Waldorf, Maryland 



10 FOREIGN MISSIONS 

A Sound Heard Around the World 



12 SPORTS 

Athletes Who are Leading by Example 

13 CE NATIONAL 
Ministry Ideas For You 



14 Teach You Child About Politics 
Whitewater, Chuck Colson 



15 FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



16 Signposts for Growth From the 
New Testament 



18 HERALD NEWSLINE 



Editor' s Note: 

In our April issue (April 1994, pages 8-9) we reprinted an article by Dr. 
Ralph Martin on foot washing. Upon a cursory reading of the article we 
felt that Dr. Martin supported our position on this ordinance. But upon 
closer examination, we noted that he has unfortunately culturalized this 
practice. Obviously we at the Herald do not agree with tins position. His 
last sentence in the article was "...the principles remain and are as 
valid and obligatory as ever." With this statement we heartily concur! 
We are so sorry for any confusion this has generated. 




Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Dan McMaster 
Foreign Missions 

Tom Julien 

Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 

Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 

Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 

Nora Macon 
Herald News Service: 
1-800-32-32-BMH 
(including Indiana) 

Cover picture by Cliff Hawley 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is a publication of the Fellow- 
ship of Grace Brethren Churches, published monthly by the 
Brethren Missionary Herald Co., P.O. Box 544, 1104 Kings 
Highway, Winona Lake, IN 46590. Telephone (219) 267-7158 

FAXNamben 219-267-4745 

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Please include payment with order. Prices include postage. 
For all merchandise orders phone toll free: 1-800-348-2756. All 
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News items contained in each issue are presented for 
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Moving? Send label on back cover with new address. 
Please allow four weeks for the change to become effective. 



Herald Magazine Policy 
News and Advertising Policy 

The Herald magazine offers space for promotional material to the 
boards, churches and members of the NFGBC. This includes 
publicizing special events, seminars, programs, or advertising for 
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between paid advertising and free news material, all purchased ad 
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1-800-348-2756. 8-5, EST. 



CHEIQLD 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



HOW ABOUT THE KIDS? 



by Mary Thompson 



What a life! Travel-Adventure-Exposure to 
other cultures-Acquisition of a foreign lan- 
guage ! There are some of the perks enjoyed by 
missionary kids. And add to that the opportunity to have a 
part in their parents' ministries. 

The benefits are terrific, but the hazards are there too. 
As you pray for our missionaries think of their children as 
they face some or all of these obstacles: 

1. Lack of Christian friends. You know how influen- 
tial friends can be, for better or for worse. And the person 
with poorer standards often seems to exert the stronger 
influence. Some missionary kids don't have a single Chris- 
tian friend where they live. 

2. Breaking ties with family and friends back home. 
When they come back to the States after several years' 
absence they don't always fit in as they did before. 

3. Being thought of as an oddity. They may live in a 
foreign land where people think of the United States as a 




wonderful place and an American as a sort of hero. But 
kids don't like to be considered different, either in their 
adopted country, or when they come back home and are the 
"visiting missionary kid." 

4 Difficulty relating to their native culture. Even 
being out of the country for two or three years a young 
person loses the continuity of his or her home culture. He 
doesn't know the "in" jargon, the styles or personalities. 
(This is not all bad, but a teenager can feel left-out.) 

5. Lack of positive role models. When missionaries 
are working in a field where there have been few converts 
there can be a dearth of Christian role models, and a pagan 
society (even though it may be considered "civilized") can 
have a strong negative influence on a child. 

6. Parents "too busy" in their ministry. I remember 
talking with a former missionary who was deeply troubled 
at the path her young adult son was taking. I tried to 
encourage her with assurance that he had been well taught 




in biblical truth and would not stray far. But she told me 
sadly that as she thought back over the boy' s childhood they 
had been so busy getting the work started that they ne- 
glected the teaching of their own son. 

7. Friction in the home. I .ook around you at Christian 
homes that are riddled with friction and even divorce. Satan 
is just as busy in other parts of the world and he is intent on 
destroying Christian families. Missionary parents with a 
strong bond of love for each other will have a lasting impact 
on their children. But a family with discord and friction will 
mar the lives of their children, and damage the ministry. 

So keep praying for your missionaries. And don't 
forget the kids ! 

Several years ago Grace Brethren Foreign Missions 
sent a questionnaire to all former MK's asking their evalu- 
ation of life on the mission field. There were, of course, 
some negative memories-some mention of benefits they 
missed being away from their own country. But the over- 
whelming consensus was that they wouldn't exchange their 
broad experiences for life as an "ordinary" child. It's still a 
great life! 




May, 1994 



,s!w> w!tc__ w!«> <ia!«> 4=fc 



,5fej> <i*J) 4*J 



Tribute To Mothers 



WHAT IS A MOTHER? 



A mother is a special friend, 

A rare and priceless treasure. 
Her thoughtfulness and pleasantness, 

Bring joy beyond all measure. 
Her fingers form a canopy, 

No cradle could replace, 
Where little ones can cast their cares, 

And leam of love and grace. 
Her faith in God remains undimmed 

Through toil and tragedy. 
She walks with him in confidence, 

Which others clearly see. 
A mother's Godliness remains, 

Beyond her earthly stay, 
Her influence is evident, 

In children taught to pray. 
Somewhere far beyond the blue, 

My mother's life goes on. 
I wonder what she'd think of me, 

Her memory makes me strong. 
And now these blessings I impart, 

To the children at my knee. 
I wonder when I am gone, 

How they'll remember me. 
I pray they'll live for Jesus Christ, 

And love him all their days. 
He gave their mother life and hope, 

Oh may his name be praised. 



-Nancy J. Ressler 



Memories of Mom 

(who went to be with the Lord on March 22, 1984 at the age of 56) 
A key word describing my mom would be "selfless". Her 
deep love for her God and Savior worked its way out in practical 
ways. When she talked with someone she had an ability to make 
them feel accepted and comfortable. She would converse with 
people no matter what was their education, ethnicity, status or 
how they treated her. I still remember my high school friend's 
comment, "Wow, your mom makes me feel just like one of your 
family!" She practiced Romans 15:7 (Phillips Paraphrase), 
"open your hearts to one another as Christ has opened his heart 
to you." 

-Mike Brubaker 



A TRIBUTE TO MY MOTHER 

I never knew I was born during the depression 
until I studied about it when I was older. It was 
because my Mother never allowed anyone to feel 
poor. Hard work and slim resources never dampened 
her joyful spirit; my earliest memories are of her 
singing as she washed clothes or prepared meals. 
Her interest in people was contagious; days were for 
work but evenings were always for visiting and on 
warm days the neighbors filled our patio until late. Her 
faith in God was uncomplicated, and her love for her 
family was constant. I am grateful to have been her son. 

—Tom Julien 



My mother came to the U.S. as a nineteen 
year old immigrant from Germany, wearing a 
baggage tag that would enable her to get to relatives 
in North Dakota, since she could not speak a word 
of English. But she brought with her a trust in God 
that was enriched and personalized with the passing 
of time. When she met my dad, love overcame 
language deficiencies, and they were married. 

Twelve years and three sons later, we all moved 
to Southern California, where in time God guided 
our steps to Himself through a Bible class in 
Pamona, then through the First Brethren Church of 
Long Beach under Dr. Louis S. Bauman's ministry. 

I cherish the memories of mom singing some 
of the old hymns as she went about her house work, 
somewhat crippled by arthritis. And I'll never forget 
overhearing her pray for her three sons, by name, 
and need: prayers that I know God heard and 
answered. 

Losing dad suddenly to a heart attack was a 
crushing blow to her, physically and emotionally. 
But her spiritual strength enabled her to overcome 
the loss, and continue to love and serve Him for 20 
years, and see many of her prayers answered. 

—Ralph J. Colburn 



6 C HE^4LD 



e$£fel^S^cSd£W^eS2foU$5^^ 



What makes Grandma Ogden 92 years young? 
Grandma loves her family. She has four living 
children, 21 grand-children and 75+ great-grandchildren. 
Each is special to her and she mails birthday cards with 
handwritten messages to all. I think flexibility and adaptabil- 
ity play a part. Grandma has very definite opinions about 
most everything, but she doesn't seen to let those opinions 
interfere with building relationships. Grandma does not live in 
the past. Like every good Grandmother she has at least a 
million stories to share from yesterday, but she is content with 
today. She does not long for yesterday nor wish for tomorrow. 
Grandma can always laugh at herself. If you ever laugh at 
Grandma, you won't be laughing alone, because she will be 
laughing harder! Most of all, Grandma is a woman of faith. 
Scripture is her greatest strength for living in a fallen world. 
She remains open to new ideas and thoughts, while holding 
fast to Biblical truth. Prayer is her greatest comfort in bearing 
the concerns of the many she loves. She does not waste energy 
with worry. Grandma lives joyfully and comfortably inside 
God's care. Grandma, may your "works bring (you) praise at 
the city gates," (Prov. 31:31) for you have been a blessing to 
so many. 

—Joan Snively 



My mother made her children her primary mission 
field. Each of the five of us publicly confessed faith 
in Christ under our fathers preaching, but she prepared 
us at home for those confessions. 

Her moral standards were Puritan. We didn't always 
agree with them, but we always knew what was right. 
One day when I was in high school she looked me in the 
eyes and said, "Russell, you always look like you agree 
with me and then go off and as you please." But I never 
pleased to go far from what she taught me. The reign on 
every wild impulse was the question, "How would you feel 
if Jesus came today and found you doing that?" It's a good 
biblical reign (see Matt. 24:42, etc.). 

Mom and Dad were not permissive, but neither were 
they demanding. They led us by example and encourage- 
ment. As we grew they allowed us to choose our own 
ways. They never pressured me to enter Christian minis- 
try, but they loved and prayed for me. When the Spirit of 
God gave me a love for his word and a desire to spend my 
life studying and teaching it, we all knew that one of 
their prayers was answered. 

— Russ Ogden 

Russ' Mom gives this advice to Russ ."Concerning 
your book, stop your research and write what's in your 
heart! 



It takes someone special to be a mother. I praise God 
for a caring mom who saw tremendous changes in her life 
both difficult and positive. She grew up as a child of 
German heritage in Philadelphia. Her father was a baker in 
Philadelphia and her family lived downtown over the store. 
She didn't even speak English until she started school. 
While in high school she met my dad and they married 
shortly after she completed her education. In the year that 
followed they gave birth to their first child and began to 
attend the First Brethren Church (GBC) near their home. 
As a result of that church dad (from a totally non- 
Christian home) accepted Christ and my mother rededi- 
cated her life to the Lord. Their lives changed dramatically. 

There were tough times. Dad went for further 
schooling, taking night classes at Philadelphia School of the 
Bible. They discovered their daughter, Margaret, was 
physically handicapped and would always have major 
problems with moving her legs. Another daughter, Nancy, 
was born. Dad felt called into the ministry and the whole 
family moved to Winona Lake, Indiana, so dad could 
complete school. 

Again there were difficult times. With very tight 
finances, mom had to go to work even though the girls were 
young. Margaret spent over a year in hospitals trying to 
remedy the birth defect of being bom with legs dislocated 
from hip sockets. It was not successful. 

Dad was both student and full-time employee in order 
to meet the basics. While mother worked at a dairy she 
contracted typhoid fever! She almost died! One evening they 
told dad there was no more that medicine could do. That 
night her temperature rose to over 105°. Even though 
doctors gave up all hope, praying people brought my mom's 
condition before the Lord in prayer. By morning a miracle 
had occurred. Her temperature was normal and she was 
healed! 

As dad completed Grace Seminary my folks were still 
so poor that they travelled to dad's ministry at the Clay 
City, IN, GBC with mom and my sisters riding on a sofa 
in the back of a rented moving truck; they had no car. 

God allowed my folks to have yet one more child-me! 
Then the troubles really began!! 

It's the rich heritage I have from my parents that 
truly encourage me. My mom loves the Lord and has 
always helped with church ministries (especially music and 
children) and taught my sisters and me to love and serve 
God. She's always had a heart for the lost. 

My mom and dad now live near Orlando, FL, where 
they continue to serve in the GBC there. They've been 
married for almost 63 years and both my parents are 
special. I thank God that in spite of all the hardships, 
they've continues to serve God with joy! I count it a 
privilege to write in honor of my godly mother. 

—Ed Lewis 



May, 1994 7 



CHURCH FOCUS 



Growing A Church 



Waldorf, Maryland 



C 



^an a church be planted in an 
area known for its gambling 
and tobacco fields? The Grace Breth- 
ren Church in Waldorf, Maryland is 
the result of eight people's desire to 
have a Grace Brethren church in their 
own city. These members of 
the Temple Hills GBC had 
Pastor James Dixon's sup- 
port and blessing to initiate a 
work in Waldorf. 

Pastor Dixon gave one 
of his pastoral staff mem- 
bers, Pastor Jeff Thornley , to 
the task. Nestled about twenty 
miles south of Temple Hills, 
Waldorf had very few evan- 
gelical churches in a predomi - 
nantly Catholic area. About 
twenty-five miles north of the 
Virginia line, Waldorf had 
gained a reputation a few de- 
cades ago as being the first 
gambling site as one drove northward 
along the much traveled Route 301. 

The church began as a Bible study 
in 1979, meeting in a home. The Lord 
continued to guide and bless, and in 
1981 the young church moved to a 
local elementary school where 70 
people attended the first public wor- 
ship service. Within a year the church 
purchased 12.5 acres of land that had 
been a tobacco field, for constructing 
its own church building. Construction 



of the sanctuary and education wing 
was completed in 1984. The first ser- 
vice in the new 7,000 square foot 
building was held Christmas Eve of 
1984 with an attendance of 170. Soon 
two and then three morning services 





Pastor Jeff Thornley, wife Cindy, John 10, Paul 8, Luke 3, in front of 
recently acquired farmhouse. 



Grace Brethren Church 
Waldorf, Maryland 

were needed. In the fall of 1 990 our 
education wing of 1 1 ,000 square feet 
was added. After waiting for more 
than a year and a half for permits, we 
plan to expand our sanctuary in 1994 
to seat 1 ,000 and to double the size of 
our education wing in 1995. Long 
range plans are to construct a sanctu- 
ary seating 3,000, along with a gym- 
nasium. This summer we purchased 
an adjoining farmhouse and 4.5 acres 
that provide needed office and educa- 
tion space, and 
will provide us 
land for addi tional 
construction. 

Attendance 
continued to grow , 
due to Pastor 
Thornley 's em- 
phasis on clear 
biblical preach- 
ing, evangelistic 
outreach, and the 
development of 
need-meeting 
ministries. The 
first ministry Pas- 



tor Jeff launched was Evangelism Ex- 
plosion, which continues to this day 
as a strong program. He and trained 
laymen would visit those who had 
visited the church, or others as con- 
tacts were made. To date more than 
120 people have become certified 
trainers in E.E. We have seen 1,000 
people visited by our teams. 

Soon Pastor Jeff realized that the 
ministry of a growing church was 
more then he himself could handle. 
He turned to the wisdom of Ephesians 
4, and began to instruct and 
equip laymen to minister 
along withhim. Overthenext 
few years he launched sev- 
eral need-meeting ministries. 
Pastor Thornley's goal was 
to begin the mini stry, staff it 
with lay men and women 
who were motivated and 
trained, and then step back, 
releasing and empowering 
the laity to minister them- 
selves to one another. He 
himself would oversee, ad- 
vise and encourage. 

Soon, the Timothy Min- 
istry of discipling was begun 
to disciple those who were won to the 
Lord through our E.E. ministry. As 
Paul discipled Timothy, so these 
people were trained to disciple young 
believers. Materials from John Max- 
well and Injoy Ministry are used by 
our Timothys. Our E.E. ministry be- 
came known as the Andrew Ministry, 
after the man in the Bible who brought 
his brother Peter to meet Jesus. They 
still use the popular Evangelism Ex- 
plosion materials. 

The increase in the number of 
people meant an increasing number of 
needs were surfacing within the con- 
gregation. To address this, two other 
complimentary ministries were be- 
gun. The Barnabas Ministry of en- 
couragement was started to meet the 
tangible needs of transportation, help 
with moving, etc. Many people com- 
mented on how encouraged they truly 
were by having help at strenuous times 
in their lives. 

The Stephen Ministry was added 
to help people cope with the emo- 
tional pain of situations such as the 
death of a loved one, divorce, long- 



CHEIQLD 




Sunday Evening vocal and instrumental ensemble 



term illness, or other such losses. 
People in these situations often can 
become taxing on a pastor, but Pastor 
Thornley believed that trained lay- 
men could comfort and express mercy 
as well and perhaps better than a pas- 
tor. Over 30 Stephen Ministers have 
been trained with 50 hours of instruc- 
tion. They all demonstrate the gift of 
mercy and corporately do the work of 
at least two full-time staff members, 
and handle hospital visitations and 
crisis intervention. 

More than 50 people regularly 
participate in our two ministries that 
concentrate on prayer: the Abraham 
Prayer Ministry, which prays weekly 
for the church and for requests people 
submit, and the Pastor's Prayer Part- 
ners, which targets its prayers for Pas- 
tor Thornley and for the corporate 
needs of the church. Over 60 
Nehemiahs maintain the buildings and 
grounds. The Biblical Counseling 
Ministry, whose purpose is to train 
laymen to counsel people from a bib- 
lical point of reference, is a vital ex- 




Sunday morning Children 's Church 



tension of pastoral coun- 
seling. 

We also have minis- 
tries targeting singles, 
singles again, and chil- 
dren. With a motto of 
"membership means min- 
istry," future ministries 
are planned to meet the 
needs of Seniors, and to 
mobilize the entire church 
membership to both cor- 
porately and individually 
become people of prayer, 
by scheduling our people 
to pray 24 hours a day, 7 
days a week, 365 days a year. 

With all this activity, one more 
big need became available-fellow- 
ship. Small groups were launched in 
the fall of 1991 along with the Meta 
Church model of Carl 
George, offering fellow- 
ship and mutual edifica- 
tion along with Bible 
study. We currently have 
about half of our church 
family of 475 involved in 
small groups, with the 
goal of having everyone 
in a group by 1 995. Small 
groups have clearly pro- 
vided the closeness and 
openness that so many 
people in our fast-paced 
society need. 

Our Christian School 
was started in 1986 with a 
preschool and kindergarten, and has 
added one grade per year. Now state 
accredited and offering preschool 
through fifth grade, the enrollment is 
nearly 200 with a faculty and staff of 
30. Cindy Thornley, Pas- 
tor Jeff's wife is Director 
of the school, along with 
being the mother of their 
three sons-John 10 years 
old, Paul 8, and Luke 3. 
The church has a s taf f 
of 30 also, with Pastor 
Barry Goods on on staff 
full time since 1989. Pas- 
tor Nathan Bryant joined 
the staff this fall on a part- 
time basis while he fin- 
ished his final year at 
Capital Bible Seminary. 
Jeff Chesemore directs 



our youth while serving also with 
Young Life in our country. 

To date, more than 1 ,000 people 
have become regulars at the Grace 
Brethren Church in Waldorf. Due to 
the transitory nature of this area sur- 
rounded by several military bases, we 
have launched many trained members 
into other fields of service. Current 
attendance runs 450-500. A two hour 
service on Sunday evenings makes 
time for Awana for the children, and 
Bible Institute and Summit Ministry 
training for the adults. 

Last summer we launched a new 
missions strategy, by sending four of 
our men along with a team of twelve 
from Honda to mass evangelize a 
community and to construct a church 
building. Within two weeks 5,000 con- 
tacts were made. 2,500 came out to 




Larry Hardy 
team 's 



Director of Evangelism Explosion, giving his 
report after a On-The-Job training visit. 

see the "Jesus" film, and over 300 
made decisions for Christ. They com- 
pleted a building seating 170, and 800 
attended its dedication. Attendance 
has tripled in the time since our men 
have returned to the states. 35 of our 
church people want to make a similar 
trip in 1994, and an equal number 
have committed to financially sup- 
port those who go. 

"The future is as bright as the 
promises of God," someone has said. 
As we join God in His work in south- 
ern Maryland, we won't gamble by 
believing His promise that He can do 
far greater things than we could ever 
ask or even imagine. If God can grow 
a church in a former tobacco field, we 
all can look forward to even greater 
things from His hand in the future. 



May, 1994 



FOREIGN MISSIONS 





Adan Panizales 

A gifted communi- 
cator and teacher of 
God's Word, Adan 
Panizales is the Pastor of 
the Greater Manila Grace 
Brethren Church in the 
Pasig neighborhood of 
the dense Filipino me- 
tropolis of Manila. He is 
a graduate of the Grace Brethren Bible Institute in the 
Philippines. Adan and his wife, Esmy, have served in 
Pasig for five years. 



Egon Paulitsch 

"My happiness is 
Christ," writes Egon 
Paulitsch, Pastor of the 
Coquerio Grace Brethren 
Church in Belem, North- 
ern Brazil. Egon learned 
about Christ at the 
Lutheran school he at- 
tended as a child. How- 
ever, it was at the Word Of Life Bible Institute in Belem 
that his faith flourished and he became connected with 
the Grace Brethren. Egon graduated from the Grace 
Brethren Seminary in Belem and was ordained in 1988. 
In addition to leading a Grace Brethren Church, Egon 
teaches at the Grace Bible Training Center and the Word 
Of Life Bible Institute. 



Mariano Azcarate 

A native of Peru, 
Mariano Azcarate had 
traversed much of South 
and Central America 
looking for fulfillment 
before he met a Bolivian 
pastor on a bus to Mexico 
City in 1981. The pastor 
introduced him to Grace 
Brethren missionary Phil Guerena who led him to Christ 
and discipled him. After graduating from Seminary in 
Guatemala, Mariano pastored the GBC of Mexico City 
for eight years. Last year, Mariano and his wife Margarita 
moved to Chiapas, a Southern state of Mexico, where 
they plan to start another GBC. Mariano is the co-founder 
of the Equipo Internacional, a coalition of national pas- 
tors and lay leaders from Guatemala, Mexico and the 
U.S. which will be sending its first national missionary to 
Cuba by this fall. 




10 



A Sound Heard 
Around the World 



United by a shared heritage and a common 
mission, Grace Brethren leaders from five conti- 
nents will gather in France this fall for the first 
Charis-lnternational Alliance conference. It will 
be a meeting of world changers-men called out 
by God for impact. The goal of this historic gath- 
ering is to create an international fellowship of 
Grace Brethren leaders for the purpose of coor- 
dinating world evangelization and church-plant- 
ing. Uniting our world-wide potential for evange- 
lism will increase our effectiveness in fulfilling the 
global mission God has given us. 

Internationalizing missions is crucial to our 
Fellowship's continued impact in the world. It 
appears that the epicenter of the world missions 
movement is shifting away from North America. 
In fact, by the year 2000 over half of the world's 
missionary force will come from countries which 
are currently considered mission fields. There- 
fore, helping international leaders discover the 
importance of their participation in missions will 
be a central element of the Charis conference. 

As Grace Brethren leaders from different 
countries gain a vision for their crucial role in 
world evangelization, they will stimulate their 
churches to take up the challenge of sending their 
own missionaries. In time, each country will orga- 
nize its own mission organization, making it pos- 
sible in years to come for a missionary to be sent 
from any country to any other country, with the 
potential of a global support base, missionary 
societies of countries where we have Grace 
Brethren churches. 

The vision is gaining momentum. The Fellow- 
ship of Grace Brethren Churches in Argentina 
initiated a dynamic work in Uruguay and plans to 
expand into the rest of South America. The 
churches of Mexico and Guatemala have banded 
together in order to start planting churches in 
Cuba and other Caribbean countries. Members 
of Grace Brethren churches in France and Ger- 
many have faithfully served in Africa. The Charis 
conference, which will be held October 3-8 at the 
Chateau of St. Albain, will be a time to coordinate 
these efforts for effectiveness and impact. Inter- 

C HE^LD 



national delegates. Field Superintendents, and 
representatives from our national organizations 
will define the principles which will lead our mis- 
sion work into the next century. 

The inhabitants of sleepy St. Albain may not 
even notice this unusual meeting. They will mostly 
ignore the many voices speaking different lan- 
guages. But where the Spirit is breaking down 
Satan's strongholds, these men and their mis- 
sion cannot beoverlooked. Combined, their voices 
will create a sound heard around the world. 

WORLD CHANGES 

Here is a list of national leaders who will attend 
the Charis-lnternational Alliance conference. 



ARGENTINA 

BRAZIL 

CAMBODIA 

CAR 

CHAD 

ENGLAND 

FRANCE 

GERMANY 

JAPAN 

MEXICO 

PHILIPPINES 

UNITED STATES 



Eduardo Coria 

Egon Paulitsch 

Vek Huong Taing 

Andre Mboi 

Jonathan Bodandje 

Lester Buckles 

Florent Varak 

Matthias Kiehl 

Shu Aoki 

Mariano Azcarate 

Adan Panizales 

Ed Lewis 



Read more about five of these national leaders in 
the accompanying columns. 



YOU CAN HAVE A SHARE in this 
historic conference! Shareholders will receive 
a certificate, and we will apply your donation 
to the travel and conference expenses of the 

national leader of your choice. Your name and 
address will be communicated to him. At the 
time of the conference in October, we will take 
pictures and send you a report of the meetings, 
hopefully with a few words from the pastor 
you are supporting The shares for individuals 
will be for $25, $50, or $100. Send your 
donation, along with the name of the national 
leader you wish to help, to GBFM designated 
"Charis". 

GBFM 

P.O. Box 588 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 




Shu Aoki 

Shu Aoki became a 
member of the Tokyo, 
Japan, GBC last March 
when he was baptized. 
"God has changed me in 
many ways," says Shu. 
"Before I became a Chris- 
tian, I wanted to pursue 
the riches which the 
world offers. But God has given me a different purpose 
for living. He has placed a burden in my heart to tell 
others how they can have life in Christ and how they can 
know the true and living God of all creation in a personal 
way. I desire to be His instrument for taking the gospel to 
the lost." Since his salvation, Shu has been actively 
sharing his faith, leading his mother and sister to Christ. 
He is currently making plans to enter Bible school and 
Seminary. This month, Shu will be coming to the United 
States to visit churches and Grace Seminary. 



Florent Varak 

It was while he was 
studying for a degree in 
Business Administration 
that Florent spent a year 
in Hartford, Connecticut, 
w here he attended the Co - 
lonial Chapel Grace 
Brethren Church. Under 
the leadership of Pastor 
Louis Huesmann, Florent gained a great appreciation for 
the Grace Brethren. So, when he returned to his native 
city of Lyon, France, Florent began leading the youth 
group of the Lyon Grace Brethren Church. Leaders 
quickly noticed the potential of this energetic and vision- 
ary young man. Florent served as Assistant Pastor of the 
Lyon church for two years before being called to become 
its Pastor. Along with his pastoral duties, Florent is 
involved in leadership of the French Federation of 
Evangelicals. Florent is coordinating and serving as host 
for the Charis-lnternational Alliance conference. 




May, 1994 



11 



Athletes Who are Leading by Example 

■ MARK DEWEY 

Spending Time At The Garage 

The building itself is nothing special. It's just an old brick 
warehouse with a couple of basketball hoops, some free 
weights, and an old pool table in a steadily declining inner-city 
neighborhood. Violence, crime, and prostitution have estab- 
lished themselves within shouting distance of the building Yet 
Pittsburgh Pirates relief pitcher Mark Dewey loves the place 

The warehouse is known as God's Garage, and it's located 
in a not-so-pleasant part of Grand Rapids, Michigan, about 1 5 
minutes from the suburban community of Jenison, where 
Dewey grew up 

It's not Los Angeles or 
Detroit But the youth of 
Grand Rapids face the 
same struggles as their 
counterparts in larger cit- 
ies. Drugs, gangs, and vio- 
lence aren't just something 
that these kids see on TV 
they see it on the streets from 
day to day That's why Dewey 
wants to help 

"When I was 1| 
didn't have to 
worry about 
somebody ask- 
ing me to deal 
drugs, or worry 
about getting 
shot, or getting 
beat up walking 
home," he ex- 
plains. "Reading 
about it, knowing 
that it exists 
doesn't really 
make it seem 
real When you 
get involved and 
get to know the 
kids, that's when 
it really starts to 
hit home." 

Dewey's in- 
volvement at the 
garage started in 
1991 when he 
contacted an old 
elementary 
school friend 
named Kevin 

Rigg, who has opened the doors to neighborhood kids since 
1988. 

"Kevin started this and basically single-handedly runs it," 
says Dewey " It's simply a place for kids to come and shoot 
some hoops, some pool, or lift weights, It's a place where they 
know they can be safe. They know that Kevin is going to care 
for them and it's where they can get away from some of the 
things they have to deal with out on the streets." 

But God's Garage is more than just a hangout. It's a place 
where kids get a glimpse of what it means to have faith in Jesus 
Christ. 




Both Dewey and Rigg look at the garage as a place where 
they can make friendships and develop relationships that allow 
them to share their faith in Christ with the young people 

"My goal is to continue the relationships I've developed 
through playing ball, playing pool, or just going places with the 
kids," Dewey explains "To get in a situation where I can share 
what it means to have a relationship with Christ. To have them 
trust me enough and respect me enough to sit down and listen. 
Until you develop that relationship, it's very hard to share 
without a defense mechanism going up." 

Many of the "regulars" at God's Garage know that Dewey 
is a major league pitcher, but Rigg says that isn't the reason the 
kids trust him. 

"The important thing with these kids is consistency. The 
fact that he has a love for the kids and wants to be here with 
them, that's the significant part. The fact that he's a baseball 
player is secondary. 

"He loves the kids, he cares for them, and he wants to be 
with them. That's important to me." 

And Rigg is serious about the commitment given to these 
kids He isn't looking for support from someone whose heart 
isn't totally into it. He isn't looking for help from some 
professional athlete who's on an ego-gratifying adven- 
ture. He wants commitment to the kids, and Mark 
Dewey delivers. 

5 . "Originally, I told Mark the 

ame thing that I tell every- 
one else," Rigg explained. 
"Take a look at it. If you 
like it, then hangout. If 
you don't, find an- 
other organization ." 
Dewey didn't 
need to look twice 
He liked it! 

He liked the 
Bible verses 
painted on the wall. 
He liked the out- 
reach opportunities. 
And he liked the heart 
of Kevin Rigg 

"He's got very few 
rules: No swearing, no 
fighting, let's just have 
fun, become friends, and 
then go from there," ex- 
plains Dewey. 

"We don't have 6 
o'clock Bible studies, but 
after 3 years I under- 
stand the kids a little 
better I realize that do- 

,.,. , ,, ,„ , ing things in a structured 

Stephen Dunn/All Sport manner doesn 1 work , 

am a very structured and organized person, so it contradicts my 
personality, but I love it!" 

He loves it so much that he's thinking about God's Garage 
in his long term plans. And Kevin Rigg likes that idea 

"He loves the ministry and he loves the kids." explains 

Rigg 

"I've met Christian athletes who haven't impressed me at 
all, but he's as real as they come." 

Reprinted by permission 
Sports Spectrum Magazine 



12 



C HEI^LD 



CE NATIONAL 



I 



Fall Call Campaign 

Start talking about conducting a 
simple, but effective, "Fall Faithful- 
ness Campaign." Each Sunday 
school teacher can be requested to 
make a 'fall call" and visit to their 
new students' homes. A visit will 
allow the teacher to meet the parents 
and will honor the children by 
having an adult visitor come all the 
way to their homes. Give the teacher 
a reason to visit a student's home: 

1. To encourage faithful attendance. 
The teacher can ask the family to 
join those who are committing to 
attend church faithfully during the 
campaign. 

2. To gather a teacher's prayer list. 
The teacher can ask to be given 
the names of two of the student' s 
friends whom the family will plan 
to faithfully invite to church 
during the campaign. The teacher 
can then commit to pray for those 
friends to attend. 



Minister to Shut-Ins 

As an ABF, have as a class a project to minister to those from your 
church who cannot attend church services by: 

• Seeing that they have one person from your class overseeing each one 
of them. 

• Remembering them in prayer weekly in your ABF. 

• Having the teacher or class leader personally phone them. 

• Sending seasonal and birthday cards to them as a class. 

• Sending church materials such as bulletins, cassettes of messages, "take 
home" papers, books from the church library, etc. 



Benefits of Sunday School 

If Sunday School did not exist, would we reinvent it? Yes! And 
here's why: 

1. Sunday school provides a structure for teaching God's Word. 

2. Sunday school gears Bible teaching to a specific age group 
(Deut. 31:12). 

3. Sunday school mobilizes and trains laity for leadership. 

4. Sunday school is discipleship. 

5. Sunday school is convenient. 

6. Sunday school organizes the church into caring groups. 

7. Sunday school leads the church in prayer and relationships. 

8. Sunday school focuses on outreach to peers and friends. 

9. Sunday school lets the church do all the above with consis- 
tency. 

Taken from portions of CE National 's Enrichment, "Benefits of Sunday School " 



Influence Your Children 

Your daily life, as you obey Jesus Christ and walk in the Spirit, is the best "spontaneous teaching" example for 
your children: 

• When you pay your bills-talk about obligations to others and how the laborer is worthy of his hire. 

• When you compliment your spouse-talk about what you love about your mate in front of your kids. 

• In a disagreement with a relative-pray about it with the kids and talk about how you handle bitterness and 
disagreements. 

• On trips-call attention to God's miraculous design. 

• Television-when you watch something together, talk about what would have been different if the people had 
been Christians. Of course, be careful about what you watch, and teach about abstinence from watching certain 
programs. 

• Church involvement-always give an explanation of why it's not just red tape or busy work. Help children 
grow up with excitement and joy about the church. 

• Using the Bible-many questions ought to drive you to a concordance or a topical index which will lead you to 
passages in the Bible. 

• When you're reading the Bible by yourself-just saying, "Look what I found!" gets attention. 

• Signs of storm or sunny weather-apply Matthew 16: 1 -3 and talk about signs of Christ' s return. 

• Weeds—say, "yuck," and quote Genesis 3: 18 and Romans 8:22. 




Taken from portions of CE National's Enrichment, "Spontaneous Teaching Helps for Parents" NATION Al 



May, 1994 



13 



Teach your child about politics 



By Joseph Sobran 



Because I write about politics, 
people are forever asking me 
the best way to teach children 
how our system of government works. 
I tell them that they can give their own 
children a basic civics course right in 
their own homes. 

In my own experience as a father, 
I have discovered several simple de- 
vices that can illustrate to a child' s 
mind the principles on which die mod- 
ern state deals with its citizens. You 
may find them helpful too. 

For example, I used to play the 
simple card game War with my son. 
After a while, when he thoroughly 
understood that the higher-ranking 
cards beat the lower-ranking ones, I 
created a new game I called Govern- 
ment. In this game, I was Govern- 
ment, and I won every trick, regard- 
less of who had the better card. My 
boy soon lost interest in my new game, 
but I like to think it taught him a 
valuable lesson for later in life. 

When your child is a little older, 
you can teach him about our tax sys- 
tem in a way that is easy to grasp. 
Offer him, say, $ 10 to mow the lawn. 
When he has mowed it and asks to be 
paid, withhold $5 and explain that this 
is income tax. Give $1 to his younger 
brother, and tell him that this is "fair." 
Also, explain that you need the other 
$4 yourself to cover the administra- 
tive costs of dividing the money. When 
he cries, tell him he is being "selfish" 
and "greedy." I.ater in life he will 
thank you. 

Make as many rules as possible. 
Leave the reasons for them obscure. 
Enforce them arbitrarily. Accuse your 
child of breaking rules you have never 
told him about. Keep him anxious that 
he may be violating commands you 
haven't yet issued. Instill in him the 
feeling that rules are utterly irrational. 
This will prepare him for living under 
democratic government. 

When your child has matured suf- 



ficiendy to understand how the judi- 
cial system works, set a bedtime for 
him and then send him to bed an hour 
early. When he tearfully accuses you 
of breaking the rules, explain that you 
made the rules and you can interpret 
them in any way that seems appropri- 
ate to you, according to changing con- 
ditions. This will prepare him for the 
Supreme Court's concept of the U.S 
Constitution as a "living document." 

Promise often to take him to the 
movies or the zoo, and then, at the 
appointed hour, recline in an easy 
chair with a newspaper and tell him 
you have changed your plans. When 
he screams, "But you promised!" ex- 
plain to him that it was a campaign 
promise. 

Every now and then, without 
warning, slap your child. Then ex- 
plain that this is defense. Tell him that 
you must be vigilant at all times to 
stop any potential enemy before he 
gets big enough to hurt you. This, too, 
your child will appreciate-not right at 
that moment, maybe, but later in life. 

At times your child will naturally 
express discontent with your meth- 



ods. He may even give voice to a 
petulant wish that he lived with an- 
other family. To forestall and mini- 
mize this reaction, tell him how lucky 
he is to be with you, the most loving 
and indulgent parent in the world, and 
recount lurid stories of the cruelties of 
other parents. This will make him 
loyal to you, and later receptive to 
schoolroom claims that the America 
of the postmodern welfare state is still 
the best and freest country on Earth. 

This brings me to the most im- 
portant child-rearing technique of all: 
lying. Lie to your child constanUy. 
Teach him that words mean nothing- 
or rather that the meanings of words 
are continually "evolving," and maybe 
tomorrow the opposite of what they 
are today. 

Some readers may object that this 
is a poor way to raise a child. A few 
may even call it child abuse. But that's 
the whole point: Child abuse is the 
best preparation for adult life under 
our form of government. 



Reprinted by permission 
,\F,A Journal 



WHITEWATER 

The most astonishing thing about Whitewater is that 
we are astonished by it. Our reaction-the press's feeding- 
frenzy and politicians' posturing-reveals how deluded we 
are about the most pernicious myth of this century: that man 
is good, and that with technology and education we can 
achieve Utopian societies. So we regard Watergate and 
Whitewater and all "gates" in between as dreadful aberra- 
tions. Our founders were not so naive. They understood the 
Judeo-Christian truth that man is a sinner. 

We moderns have forgotten this foundational truth. Then we are shocked that 
a governor apparently made sweetheart deals, and White House aides overzealously 
protected their president. Not to minimize wrongdoing, only to understand it, one 
should recognize that, like it or not, governors do make cozy deals and White House 
aides are by nature-l know-overzealous. 

Charles W. Colson 

White House aide convicted in Watergate 

Chairman Prison Fellowship Ministries 




14 



C HE^LD 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



Fellowship 
News 



Address changes: 

Steve and Celeste Kern 
75365 Calw-Alzenberg 
GERMANY 

Bill and Beckie Kiddoo 
40 Thornton Road 
Shirley, Solihull 
West Midland, B90 4TP 
ENGLAND 
Phone: 
(011-44)21-744-7277 

Ted and Kristen Kirnbauer 

P.O. Box 588 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Walter and Alys Haag 
P.O. Box 5944 
Chula Vista, CA 91912 
Phone:(619)522-0031 



Death notices: 

Winston Churchill Fuller, 80, went to be with his Lord on February 18, 1994 
He was a member ot the Conemaugh Grace Brethren Church, Conemaugh, PA 
for 22 years Tom E. Goossens, Pastor. 

Dale Knepper, Sr., 64, passed away unexpectedly on March 24 of a massive 
heart attack while at work He was a member of the Grace Brethren Church in 
York, Pennsylvania. He and his wife, Annette, have been actively involved at 
Brethren National Youth Conference for many years 

Eileen Grady, a member of the Grace Brethren Church in Waterloo, Iowa 
passed away March 30 She had been diagnosed with cancer this past fall She 
is survived by her husband, Jim, and two children; Stephanie, a student at Grace 
College; and Matthew, a junior in high school. As a result of her illness Eileen 
had the opportunity of leading two people to the Lord Eileen and her husband, 
Jim, were both counselors at the 1993 Brethren National Youth Conference 



Grace Students Spend Time 
Chatting With Bill Clinton 



BY GARY GERARD 



A musical group from Grace College got a 
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity last weekend in 
Washington, DC. 

They got to sing to - and chat with - a U.S. 
president 

Steve Wishart is the director of "Sound 
Investment," a vocal and instrumental ensemble. 
Wishart, his wife, Lauren, their sons Aaron and 
Adam, and several other members of the group 
met and talked with President Bill Clinton last 
Sunday evening. 

Wishart said the group was in the D.C area 
finishing up a spnng tour. They had just per- 
formed a concert in Laurel, Md., which is just 
outside the beltway. Since they were so close, 
they decided to go by the White House. 

It was about 9 p.m when they met a Secret 
Service agent at a church in Laurel, Maryland. 
"My wife kind of talked him into taking us on a 
tour of the White House," Wishart said. 

But before they got started, Bill Clinton 
happened by. 

"We were standing out on West Executive 
Drive and he just walked up to us and introduced 
himself. It was amazing. He said, 'Hi, I'm Bill,' 
as if we didn' t know. I guess he walked a fnend 
out to a car or something," 



'^9^m 


M^HHfgii 


I 1 




^^Br 




nuJ 


K_^l 



Wishart 
said Clinton was 
wearing blue 
jeans, tennis 
shoes and a flan- 
nel shirt 

The group told Clinton who they were and where they were from and he asked 
them to sing. 

They sang "And Can It Be," an a cappella number. 

"He stood there and listened to us and actually sang - or hummed - along. He 
tried to harmonize. Then we just chatted for five of six minutes," Wishart said. "He 
said he used to be in the church choir and that it was one of the things he missed 
most" since entering politics. 

Wishart, quoting Clinton as best he can recall, said the president told them: 
"You don' t know how much this meant to me. It' s been a tough weekend and this 
was a great way to end it." 

Clinton may have been referring to the weekend bombing of Bosnian Serb 
strongholds by U.S. forces. 

Wishart said the group came away with a different impression of the president 
than before they met him. 

"We all pretty much said beforehand that we'd really let him have it if we saw 
him, but it was much different when we met him," he said. "It was incredible. We 
stood and prayed for him right outside the west wing lobby with two Secret Service 
agents standing with us. 

"We haven' t changed as far as disagreeing with some of his policies, but it 
made us much more committed to praying for him - for wisdom, guidance- instead 
of criticizing him." 



Repri rued by perm u 



' Warsaw Times Union • Warsaw. Indiana 



May, 1994 



15 



Signposts 



Growth 
from the 

New 

Testament 

DAVID PROCTER 



Someone has described the Bible 
as the handbook for church growth, 
and so it is. While many excellent 
books have been published about how 
to grow a church, the Bible remains 
our primary resource. In our quest for 
fresh ideas , we can overlook the single- 
most important guide to church 
growth: the Bible itself. 

The Book of Acts records the 
astonishing growth of the early church, 
from 120 believers to many thousands 
(see Acts 1:15; 2:41, 47; 4:4; 5:14; 
6: 1 , 7; 21 :20). It is significant that this 
numerical growth was observed, re- 
corded, and regarded as evidence of 
God at work. From the beginning, 
God has enabled His churches to grow. 

Hundreds of passages offer in- 
sight into winning and developing be- 
lievers. Consider the following "sign- 
posts" that offer strategies for church 
growth. 



■ 



'As you sent me into 
the world, I have sent 
them into the world." 1 
In this verse, our 
work is compared to the 
work of Jesus Himself. 
His commission and authority become 
our commission and authority. Noth- 
ing less than the ministry of Jesus is to 
be our model for reaching the lost. 
Jesus saw every person as needing the 
gospel and redemption. 



A conviction by believers that we 
are ambassadors for God, commis- 
sioned for ministry by Jesus Himself, 
is more important to church growth 
than any method. 



Matthew 

28:19-20, 

NIY 



"Therefore 
go and 
make dis- 
ciples of all 
nations, 
baptizing them in the name of the 
Father and of the Son and of the Holy 
Spirit, and teaching them to obey ev- 
erything I have commanded you. And 
surely I will be with you always, to the 
very end of the age." 

We are a people under orders to 
evangelize the whole world. Jesus 
speaks not of limitations but of power, 
vision, and opportunity. Some 
churches do not grow because of self- 
imposed limitations. 

1 . Geographical limitations- We 
reach out only to our "church field." 

2. Social limitations-We reach 
out only to "our kind of people." 

3. Language limitations-We fail 
to provide Bible study for other lan- 
guage groups. 

4. Facility limitations-We do not 
want to build or borrow to build more 
space to reach people. 

God is committed to help His 
people overcome any limitations that 
hinder the spread of the gospel. Our 
vision for witness should expand to 
include the entire nation and the world. 
This means generous giving to mis- 
sions as one means of fulfilling the 
Great Commission. 

"But you will re- 
ceive power when 
the Holy Spirit 
comes on you; and 
you will be my wit- 
__ ness in Jerusalem, 

and in all Judea and Samaria, and to 
the ends of the earth." 

Church growth comes from God. 
It is His church, and God's work must 
be done God's way. The Holy Spirit 
enables a church to grow. No applica- 




tion of principles or methods will pro- 
duce a true New Testament congrega- 
tion without the work and anointing of 
the Holy Spirit. 

Believers are the instruments God 
uses to bear witness to Himself, but 
the Spirit' s role is decisive. Paul said, 
"I planted the seed, Apollos watered 
it, but God made it grow" (1 Cor. 3:6, 
NIV). 



1 Corinthians 

2:2, NIV 



"For I re- 
solved to 
know 
nothing 
while I was with you except Jesus 
Christ and him crucified." 

All church-growth principles 
must be filtered through the person of 
our Lord Jesus Christ. Paul issues a 
warning against the temptation to rely 
on any human program or attraction. 
Paul' s primary concern was to be faith- 
ful rather than successful. 

The person and work of Jesus 
was the beginning and end of Paul' s 
message. He did not lapse into senti- 
mentality or nostalgia for the "good 
times"; he presented Christ "cruci- 
fied." 

He told the truth in terms his 
contemporaries could understand. 
Some today will accept this appeal; 
some will reject it. 



Acts 

4:31, 

NIY 



"After they prayed, 
the place where they 
were meeting was 
shaken. And they 
were all filled with the 
Holy Spirit and spoke 
the word of God boldly." 

Prayer and power are closely re- 
lated in the New Testament. The 
twelve apostles noticed the connec- 
tion between Jesus' powerful public 
ministry and His private prayer life. 
The church in Acts likewise is 
energized by prayer. The growth of 
the church in some ways is propelled 
from prayer meeting to prayer meet- 
ing. The disciples pray that they may 
be bold witnesses in the face of rejec- 
tion and even hostility (see Acts 4:29). 



16 



C HEI^LD 



The prayer is answered immedi- 
ately with powerful, positive results. 
God still answers this kind of prayer 
with a yes! 



4:7, NIV 



"Jesus said 
to a Sa- 
maritan 
woman 
who came 
to draw water, "Will you give me a 
drink?" 

Some church members can be 
trained in direct personal evangelism. 
Trained believers can witness with 
confidence as opportunities come in 
the "traffic patterns" of their daily 
lives. Jesus' passing encounter with 
the Samaritan woman at the well of 
Sychar became a wonderful opportu- 
nity to share the gospel that ultimately 
led to the salvation of many others in 
the community. 

All believers can be trained in 
relational evangelism skills. This takes 
advantage of the normal, daily rela- 
tionships that are part of each 
believer's life. 

"On that day a great 
persecution broke 
out against the 
church at Jerusa- 
lem, and all except 
the apostles were 
scattered throughout Judea and 
Samaria." 

The Lord wants growing churches 
to bear witness to all nations and com- 
munities. Persecution drove the first 
believers to perform missions; the 
Holy Spirit today leads believers and 
churches to spread the gospel will- 
ingly by witnessing and establishing 
new churches. 




Luke 

14:23, 

NIV 



"Then the master 
told his servant, 'Go 
out to the roads and 
country lanes and 
make them come in, 
so that my house will 
be full.'" 

Growing 



churches share with their Lord His 
compelling sense of urgency to wit- 
ness. We should expect many-not 
few-to be saved. 

Organizations from the postal ser- 
vice to municipal utilities maintain 
service to every citizen in every U.S. 
community. How much more should 
our churches work together to witness 
to every family and individual! Sur- 
veys, Bible distribution, door-to-door 
witnessing, telephone outreach, and 
radio and television are all possibili- 
ties for reaching every person. 



2 Timothy 

3:16-17, 

NIV 



"All Scripture is 
God-breathed 
and is useful for 
teaching, rebuk- 
ing, correcting 
and training in 
righteousness, so that the man of God 
may be thoroughly equipped for ev- 
ery good work." 

Growing churches understand the 
importance of Bible study in reaching 
and maturing each individual. The 
Bible is unlike any other book; it con- 
tains the only message we know to 
share with a lost world. 

The early church saw itself teach- 
ing not for "education" but for "trans- 
formation." To know God' s Word was 
to obey God's Word, and believers 
experienced practical and beneficial 
results. Sunday School continues to 
reach and grow thousands of new be- 
lievers each year. 



1 



"No one can come to 
me unless the Father 
who sent me draws 
him." 

Henry Blackaby 
observes: "When you 
see someone seeking God or asking 
about spiritual matters, you are seeing 
God work." 2 

Only the Spirit of God can spark 
an interest in spiritual things in an 
unbeliever' s life. No program or pro- 
motion can create such an interest. 

We expect too much when we 
ask lost people to share our interest 



and enthusiasm for Jesus, prayer, the 
Bible, and the church. Yet when such 
interest comes, we often ignore or 
overlook it. 

Believers should be trained to 
watch and listen in the normal "traffic 
patterns" of life. We should assume 
God is at work, stop what we are 
doing, and give undivided attention to 
unbelievers when they inquire about 
spiritual matters. 



Matthew 
24:14, NIV 



"And this 
gospel of 
the king- 
dom will be 
preached in the whole world as a tes- 
timony to all nations, and then the end 
will come." 

The last person will be saved 
someday. God in his sovereign wis- 
dom and knowledge will declare the 
work of witness finished. 

"Church growth" will conclude, 
and celebration will begin. Churches 
and believers who long for the return 
of their Master will bear faithful wit- 
ness to Him to the ends of the Earth. 
God is bringing the world to its 
destined and proper conclusion. Be- 
lievers are privileged to have a part by 
praying, witnessing, discipling, and 
giving sacrificially to mission causes 
worldwide. May God's people be 
faithful to the end! 



'From the Holy Bible, New Inter- 
national Version, copyright © 1973, 
1978, 1984 by International Bible So- 
ciety. Subsequent references are 
marked NIV. 

2 HenryT. Blackaby and Claude V. 
King, Experiencing God: Knowing and 
Doing the Will of God (Nashville: The 
Sunday School Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, 1990,26. 

David Procter is minister of education and 
church administration, Travis Avenue Baptist 
Church, Fort Worth, Texas. 



From Growing Churches. January March 1 994 OCopynghl 

1993 The Sunday School Board 

of the Southern Baptist Convention 

All rights reserved Used by permission 



May, 1994 



17 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



Herald 
Newsline 



Children and children's workers were encouraged and 
challenged over the weekend by Mr. Ernie Rettino. CE 
National sponsored a Conference on Children on March 20 
at Ashland, OH Grace Brethren Church. Ernie Rettino, 
Psalty, did an excellent job. Seminars were helpful and 
children's workers and parents were able to learn some 
practical ideas to use in their churches Then on March 21 
over 2600 people came to hear Psalty in two Funtastic 
Praise Parties. Hundreds of children made decisions for 
Christ. Praise the Lord for a great weekend in Ashland. 

Evangelism Retreat - "This weekend we went on a 
retreat with members of the Brethren Assembly," writes 
George Swain from Prague, Czech Republic. "The purpose 
was to provide a forum where believers could bring unbe- 
lievers in order to explain Christianity to them. For sixteen 
hours a day the guests listened to lectures, asked questions 
and heard testimonies. At the end of the week, many of the 
new people became believers and were thankful for the 
opportunity to hear the Gospel . We were able to talk one-on- 
one with quite a few people which gave us opportunity to 
work on our Czech." 

The Practice of Ministry Leadership will be held May 
30-June 3 - 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. (plus Tuesday and Thurs- 
day evenings) at Grace Seminary, Winona Lake, IN. The 
professor is Lyle E, Schaller, one of the foremost authorities 
on the church in the United States today. He is the author of 
over forty insightful books and 1 ,000 articles covering a wide 
range of issues related to American Christianity. As a 
consultant, he has worked with hundreds of churches over 
the past three decades and is acutely aware of the needs 
and opportunities facing the local church. Course descrip- 
tion: This seminar is intended especially for pastors who 
would like to increase their competence as leaders, improve 
their frame of reference for identifying congregational is- 
sues, and prepare themselves to serve as planning consult- 
ants to their own congregations. While focusing on pastors 
and pastoral issues, much of the discussion and content will 
be applicable as well to Christian workers other than pas- 
tors. 1-800-54-GRACE, Ext. 5627 

Tabio Gaston, Nzambo Marcel, and Dr. Jim Hines were 
decorated with medals in Bangui, Central African Republic, 
at the end of last year A letter from the governor cited their 
exemplary care of gun shot victims at the Boguila Hospital 
during 1993. 

By now you have discovered the Herald newsline has 
a new number and it is 21 9-267-7826. Again we regret that 



we had to pull the 800 line, but it was costing us over $1 , 1 00 
per month and we could not continue to publish both the 
Herald magazine and the free newsline. We will only change 
the news once a week unless there is a special story that 
needs to be communicated quickly. The BMH is also work- 
ing on setting up E-mail for the entire Fellowship for prompt 
news transmission. We are trying to link up every church 
with either the pastor or a key layman. So pray for us as we 
establish this network. 

Pastor Milt Ryerson has been called by the Southern 
Lancaster, PA Grace Brethren Church to serve as Associ- 
ate Pastor of Senior Adult Ministries. Milt and Sue plan on 
moving to Lancaster in April 

Are you familiar with the 1 0/40 Window? This is a new 
target area for evangelism and missions called the "10/40 
Window". This area extends from 1 degrees north to 40 
degrees north latitude and includes 62 countries. 3.1 billion 
people live in this "window" - that is 60% of the world's 
population! Although this 10/40 Window contains 55 of the 
least evangelized nations of the world, or 95% of the 
unreached people of the world, only 27% of all evangelical 
missionaries are working in these countries. The religious 
make-up of this area is 22% Muslim, 23% Hindu, 5% 
Buddhist, along with many splinter sects and atheists/ 
agnostics. There has been call for major refocusing of 
missionary resources to this part of the world in the last few 
years. Many of our missionaries are currently laboring in this 
window which includes countries such as: the Philippines, 
japan, Cambodia, Cameroon, Mali, and Mauritania. 

Are you encouraged by the family-oriented TV pro- 
gram, "Christy," which is aired Thursday nights. Please write 
to CBS (national and local) to encourage them to continue 
this type of programming. The address is: CBS, Jeff 
Sagansky, CBS Entertainment, 7800 Beverly Blvd., Los 
Angeles, CA 90036. 

Grace Community Church, Anchorage, Alaska had 
1 ,800 on Easter Sunday. They have 316 members. 

Augustin Hibaile is returning to the U.S.A. Many of you 
met him last summer while he was here for studies at Grace 
Seminary He is the director of the Bible institute in Bata, 
Central African Republic. This May, he, his wife and two of 
their children will be coming to Winona Lake to continue 
work on his doctorate at Grace. 

The national WMC has partnered with the mission to 
raise funds to cover expenses they'll incur in the States. 
About $2400 is needed to cover health insurance, books, 
and supplies. Perhaps you'd like to help by giving to the 
Hibaile fund. Make checks payable to "GBFM" and direct 
your gift to the mission. 

Seize the Moment is the theme of the Promise Keepers 
Regional Conference set for June 3-4 in the various regions 
around the US. Speakers will include Bill Bright, Bill Hybels, 
Gary Smalley, Joe Stowell, and Bill McCartney. 



18 



c HEt^LD 



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"IGNITING NEW VISION" 

FGBC NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

July 23-28, 1994 

Grenelefe Resort, Haines City, FL 

Registration: After June 1 - $35/person, $60/family 

MAIL TO: F.G.B.C. COORDINATOR'S OFFICE, P.O. BOX 386, WINONA LAKE, IN 46590 

Reservation for Rooms: Grenelefe Resort, 3200 St. Rt, 546, Haines City, FL 33844 - (800) 237-9549 
Identify yourself as "Grace Brethren" 

Contact your pastor or call the Fellowship Coordinator Charles Ashman at (219) 269-1269 for forms or information. 




Steve Green 




Christine Wyrtzen 




Bob Fetterhoff 

Moderator 



Tom Gale 
Worship Leader 




Dan Allan 



Jim Custer 




I Greg Buchanan 




Charles Ashman 

Conference 

Coordinator 




Knute Larson 




Bill Bright 




Ed Lewis 
Moderator Elect 




H.B. London 



Wooster GBC 
Worship Team 




Paula Popenfoose 
Children 's 
Director 




R.C. Sproul 



imf^LD 



EDITORIAL 



THANKS. DAD! 



By Jeff Carroll 



Several years ago at National Confer- 
ence, I wrote the following letter to my 
father. 

Dear Dad, 

On this occasion of your 65th birth- 
day I wanted to just write you a note to 
tell you how much I appreciate you as 
my Father. 

I am grateful to you for a number of 
reasons. 

1. At a recent men's fishing trip that 
our church had, who do you think 
was able to catch bass when no one 
else could? I remember watching 
youfor hours noting how you moved 
the line and fished out the pond. 

2. Thanks also for teaching me to play 
golf. It always seems that the men of 
our church and others who do not 
yet know the Lord, have a new re- 
spect for me when I'm able to really 
hit that ball. 

3. Dad, I want to thank youfor the 
many years that you were commit- 
ted to providing for ourfamily-us. I 
know that there were probably 
many, many days when you did not 

feel very good and because you loved 
us, you went to work anyway. 
Thanks Dad, as I try to raise a family 
I appreciate your sacrifices all the 
more. 

4. Finally, the most important thing 
that you have taught me is the qual- 




ity of perse- 
verance-the 
personal at- 
titude of 
never being 
willing to 
quitonceyou 
have begun 
something. I 
have needed 
this quality 
in my life 
over the last 
two years. 

Dad, that's what's on my heart to- 
day and I just wanted to let you know. 
I hope that in the days ahead you can 
really make your life count for eternity. 
I hope you realize that Pam and I need 
you, that your grandchildren need you 
and want to see you more often. 

I pray that the Lord will not allow 
you to become bitter with age, but 
better as you serve Him until He comes. 

With much appreciation, 
Jeff 

My Father died in 1991 and as I was 
going through his important papers I found 
this letter along with a similar one from my 
brother. Both of the letters were carefully 
preserved. 

Now, I'm not going to tell you what you 
should do, because I think you already 
know. But I will remind you that Father's 
Day is June 19th. 



June, 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



BRETHREN MISSIONARY 




Volume 56 No. 6 



June, 1994 






2 Igniting New Vision 

FGBC National Conference 



3 EDITORIAL 
Thanks, Dad! 



5 CHURCH FOCUS 

A Dream Springs Forth, Macedonia, Ohio 

6 Two Things I Learned From My Father 

8 WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 
WMC Meets OTN Women from the 
Central African Republic 

9 CE NATIONAL 

There Are No Dumb Ideas In Outreach 

10 Grace to Go- Waterloo Missions Team to 
Dominican Republic 

1 1 A Response to Following in the First 
Christians Footsteps 

12 Using People' s Gifts 
14 Stuff I've Learned 

16 SPORTS 

Athletes Who are Leading by Example 

17 Fatherless Families Fuel Crime Explosion 



18 Highlights from the Herald Newsline 
Fellowship News 



19 The Rutherford Institute Tells 

Public School ACLU Is Wrong About 
Graduation Prayer 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Dan McMaster 
Foreign Missions 

Tom Julien 

Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 

Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 

Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 

Nora Macon 
Herald News Service: 
1-800-32-32-BMH 
(including Indiana) 

Cover picture by Ron DiCianni 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is a publication of the Fellow- 
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Please include payment with order. Prices include postage. 
For all merchandise orders phone toll free: 1-800-348-2756. All 
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News items contained in each issue are presented for 
information and do not indicate endorsement. 

Moving? Send label on back cover with new address. 
Please allow four weeks for the change to become effective. 



Herald Magazine Policy 
News and Advertising Policy 

The Herald magazine offers space for promotional material to the 
boards, churches and members of the NFGBC This includes 
publicizing special events, seminars, programs, or advertising for 
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"HEBOID 



A Dream Springs Forth 



By Pastor Ron Boehm 



It was only a dream in 1985-the existence of a 
Grace Brethren church in Macedonia. There were 
no members, no pastor, no land, no building, no 
programs in operation and no budget to be met. But 
neither was there additional support for missionaries, 
people being saved, spiritual growth taking place 
through His Word, workers being raised up, worship 
or preaching in the context of the Grace Brethren faith. 
What was taking place in Macedonian churches fell 
far short of what Grace Brethren people consider to be 
a "healthy church experience." 

How can I express the deep satisfaction and 
personal joy I feel over what God has done. Where 
there was virtually nothing, God has made something! 
Today we have 97 family units on our church direc- 
tory, 214 in worship (two services), 113 in Sunday 
school, 40 boys and girls on Wednesday nights, 13 
different small group experiences, and a missions 
goal of $20,000; last summer we sent out two teens on 
Operation Barnabas, a family of four to Russia, and a 
single young man to China-all for the sake of the 
gospel. We now have a very functional building and 
ten acres of land in the heart of Macedonia. Our elders 
and deacons work sacrificially to produce a spiritual 
arena for ministry. All this within a Grace Brethren 
belief system-a heritage for which we are thankful. 

Statistics cannot grasp the significance of what 
God is doing in our midst. The predominant religious 
system of Greater Cleveland is Roman Catholic-one 
which is failing to lead people to salvation and a 
meaningful relationship with Christ. Rick and Jackie, 
Catholic, had two young children and lived in 
Macedonia. Jackie was invited to one of our "MOMS" 
groups. In the spring of 1990 Rick and Jackie attended 
a parenting seminar led by Pastor Ron and Chery. 
Both trusted Christ and continue with the church to 
this day. Jacqui began to attend because of her mother. 
She testified at her baptism last month that she pri- 
vately asked the Lord to be her Savior at the conclu- 
sion of a Mother's Day service. Jacqui is now attend- 
ing a small group Bible Study and growing in her 
faith. Then there is Mike, whose wife attended Grace 



regularly. She invited a small group to meet in her 
home. So Mike became acquainted with several men 
from Grace over the next 12 months and even helped 
construct our building through the fall. He had at- 
tended worship only once or twice, but on the first 
Sunday we met in our building (Dec. 22, 1991) he 
came and privately responded to the Lord's offer of 
salvation. He now works with our youth and heads up 
our summer Softball program. 

I sometimes wish our church was full of people 
whom we had led to the Lord-conversion growth. 
However, that is simply not the case. Being in a region 
which is still developing, many Christians come here 
looking for a place in which their family can grow 
spiritually and serve Christ. Dave and Linda came 
from Delaware, Ohio, Dick and Bobbie from Con- 
necticut, Eliot and Marlis from Georgia, and so on. 

Another group of people to whom we often min- 
ister are those who are seeking God but have been 
hindered in their quest for Him at the church they once 
attended. Sometimes these folks stay awhile and are 
refurbished enough spiritually that they go back to 
their former "traditions." Many others join us because 
they see the Spirit of God here, and they want to be a 
part of His work. 

Yes, God is doing His marvelous work of grace 
and love in His people here as we seek to know Him 
through His Word and honor Him with our obedience. 
He wants to do the same in churches yet to be started 
in the Greater Cleveland area and in other Grace 
Brethren Churches. We must learn to dream ahead to 
the future, and release ourselves from the fantasies of 
the past. Could it be that God wants the Grace Breth- 
ren people, who believe "the Bible, the whole Bible, 
and nothing but the Bible," to become the "mainline" 
church in America? "Now to Him who is able to do 
exceeding abundantly beyond all that we ask or think, 
according to the power that works within us, to Him 
be the glory in the church and in Christ Jesus to all 
generations forever and ever. Amen." (Ephesians 
3:20-21) What is only a dream... can spring forth to 
His glory! 



June, 1994 



None of us can know how much we learned 
from our father. As I think back to my childhood I 
remember my father on the floor roaring like a lion 
to give us children a shivery joy. Was he teaching 
us? Yes, but we did not know that he was shouting 
us that children are important. And he probably did 
not think of that fun as teaching. 

My father worked at irregular hours so often 
spent the night working. He would come home, eat 
his breakfast, and then read his Bible. Always he 
read before going to bed to rest for another night's 
work. 

As a young lad my father lost a beloved relative. The pastor 
who conducted the funeral service used James 4:13-15 as his text. 
Those verses made such a profound impression on my father that 
he alivays said, "If the Lord wills". 

As I observed my father I saw that his high moral standards 
were based on eternal truths. So in addition to his moral example 
he taught me tivo important things: (1) read the Bible faithfully; 
(2) know that each tomorrow is according to the will of the Lord. 

Ruth Snyder 
Winona Lake, Indiana 



It's hard to break down into itemized "things" all that my 
Dad (and Mom) taught me as I was growing up, mainly because 
life itself was a teaching tool, and the lessons flowed and over- 
lapped as each situation unfolded. But if I had to pick two main 
areas in which Dad has taught me both through words and 
example, I would choose "tlu importance ofknouring God" and 
"being a person of integrity" . 

I have always thought of Dad as a person who genuinely 
enjoys being with God. Some Christians give the impression that 
a relationship with God is a struggle, a chore that has to be 
fulfilled. I cannot count the times I've noticed Dad in a quiet 
mood, either on the back porch or sitting in a room, and I 've asked 
him what he was doing, and he has answered: "I'm just spending 
time with the Lord ".One time he was staying with us in Dayton, 
and as he was meditating (on the front porch!) he witnessed a car 
accident on our street (that really lii'ened up his quiet time! 
Fortunately, everyonezvas O.K.) As a result of Dad's closeness to 
the Lord, I hai'e sensed strength and peace in his life; he seems 
calm when circumstances aren't conducive to it! 

The other thing that Dad taught me was integrity. In the 
way he lived, and in our talks, he made it clear that it was vital to 
have a clear conscience in the eyes of God, even if it meant that 
people didn 'I always understand. Lying was never acceptable, 
ei>en to "help out" a situation, because we were searing our 
conscience, and deceiinng ourselves as well as others. This has 
been invaluable to me, as I think 1 was born a "people-pleaser", 
which isn 'I always good! Hopefully 1 'm becoming more and more 
a "God-pleaser"! 

Thank Dad, for all these lessons, and for loving me! 

Your daughter, 

Becky Schwan 

West Midland, England 



Two Things I Learned 
From My Father 



My father has been with the Lord for twenty-eight years 
now, but my life is still being impacted by the things I learned 
from him. 

1 . Generosity - 1 remember as a small child, my father giving 
candy from his gas station to all the little children who came in. 
He gai'e a new jacket to my boyfriend, who later became my 
husband, the first time he met him. He bought suits for mission- 
aries home on furlough. He sacrificed to send me to a Christian 
college, with the stipulation that I marry a preacher before I finish, 
(which I did). 

2. Real Faith- 1 recall my father's faith being very simple, yet 
very genuine. It was his faith that he got most excited about. He 
loved to be in church and was active in Christian Business 
Association. He loved to share his faith with others. I think of a 
time when two ladies drove into his place of business and 
informed him that they were lost and needed directions. His reply 
was to "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved. " 
It turned out they were on visitation for a nearby church. 

by Julie Combs 
Norton, Ohio 



Erma Bombeck once wrote that, when she was a little girl, 
her father was like the light in the refrigerator. Every house had 
one, bid no one really knew what either of them did once the door 
was shut. Like many kids, my childhood memories of my Dad 
were of Ins comings and goings. Being a busy doctor, Dad had to 
come and go a lot, but when 1 became a teenager, he asked me to 
spend my Saturday mornings and vacations working as his 
secretary/bookkeeper. I'm so thankful he was willing to open the 
door to his private life and let me get to know him as a person. I've 
always known him to be a caring person; in our home, that was 
certainly the case. But working with him and seeing his devotion 
to people and their needs helped me understand that caring 
doesn 't just Imppen at home; it should spill over into the lives of 
all those whom God sends our way. 

In looking back, I guess the other important thing that I 
learned from Dad is the influence of example. I learned very early 
that Dad nez>er asked anything of me tint he didn't demand of 
himself. He led the way in ei'ery area of life. Is it any wonder that 
his children all chose his values as our values, his God as our God ? 
We have been richly blessed to have him as our father and our 
friend. 

Becky Good 
Dijon, France 



C HEI^LD 



Twenty years have passed since I had the joy of selecting the 
perfect "Father's Day" card for my father, Ed Scofield, It was a 
card to convey not only my love but also my appreciation for 
having him as my father. God in his providence chose to call my 
dad home during the Christmas season of '74. Tliough his absence 
has been keenly felt, his manner of life, goals, and principles are 
still with me in the deep recesses of my heart and mind, quietly 
prodding me to be the woman he wanted me to be. 

"Two things I learned from my father": He demonstrated an 
uncompromising attitude towards right and wrong his entire life 
by the way lie conducted his personal life, finances, and dealings 
with family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors. "A righteous 
man who walks in his integrity-halo blessed are his (daughters) 
after him. " Proverbs 20:7 

Tlie second and most import an t thing was his example tome 
to save God with one's whole heart. Coming to Christ in his 
forties, my dad left a lucrative job to pursue afidl-time ministry 
as a pastor-to study and preach God's Word attempting to fulfill 
Romans 12:1-2. My father tried to live what lie preached. 

jan Woodruff 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Since my dad's death a year ago, I have spent a lot of time 
reminiscing and thanking God for the many things he had taught 
me. Probably tlie hvo most profound lessons I learned are a 
steadfast commitment to God and a deep love for nature. 

Dad came to know the Lord in his late forties. He often told 
me, "If I had only yielded to the Holy Spirit sooner, 1 think God 
would have had me be a missionary. Don 'I wait to serve Him. It 's 
the right thing to do. " His gentle encouragement to do "tlie right 
thing," lias left a deep impression on my life and has been a 
compelling force in my Christian walk. He may have never been 
a misionary in the sense he felt he was "too late" for, but through 
the lives he touched and loved, he touched the world for God. 

Nature was the classroom dad most enjoyed teaching from. 
Although our family never liad much material zvealth, the wealth 
ofknozvledge dad gave us about nature coidd never be bought nor 
learned in a classroom. Tlie woods became our classroom. Sassa- 
fras, mint, morel mushrooms, birch bark, and wild raspberries 
became treasures to be found. Homes for squirrels, rabbits, 
racoons, and numerous birds were mysterious and exciting 
findings. Feathers, leaves, pinecones, and stones bulged our 
pockets after a long day of learning. I nozv take my children to 
grandpa 's classroom, and thank God He let Hen ry Dawson, their 
grandfather, touch tlieir world. 

Darlene Edwards 
Ashland, Ohio 



My father was a Christian who lived out his love for Christ. 
He never showed his anger to mother or us children. Yes, he 
punished us children when we did things that were not right. 1 
remember one time I thought 1 could get away from him knowing 
of the thing J did when he had told us not to . I was told to stay in 
my room all day. Never again did 1 disobey. 

When I was in Moody he asked mother if she cared if he came 
to spend the day with me. Others were coming to attend the 
Conference. 

That day was my last day with him because tlie next month 
he got tlie flu and the Lord took him home. The Lord does things 
right even though we don't understand. 

The Lord is good to give us Christian parents. 

Ruth Kent 



Dear Dad, 

I want to thank you, Dad, for every lesson that you have 
taught me in tlie course of my life. However, there are two lessons 
that I want to stress, as hairing been most impacting on me 
personally. 

The most important character building began when I was a 
small child. It was the teaching of the absolute authority of the 
Word of God. "The Bible, the wliole Bible, and nothing but the 
Bible." That's what you always told me. The Word of God has 
become my standard for daily life! The Word of God is sufficient 
for every challenge in my life, for direction and answers. Through 
the Word, the Lord instructs me and communicates with me. The 
more I hide His Word in my heart, the morel have the knowledge 
of the scripture to enable me to grow in Christ and be Christ's 
faithful follower. Dad, your love for the Word and all that that 
encompasses in living out life is seen in your own actions toward 
our home and our church. 

You attempt to adliere to the Word of God with total 
dependency on Christ in everything you do. Your complete 
reliance on God is reflected in all you 've done for me as my Dad. 
I Peter 5:1 7 says, "Cast all your cares upon Him, for He cares for 
you. " The Lord wants my total dependency. He wants to protect 
me, teach me, and most of all love me, even to the point that He 
died for me. Your commitment and dependency on the Lord, Dad, 
shows up in everything you do for Mom and us kids. 

The second lesson enhances your enjoyment of life. Dad, 
your goofy, silly, corny, dry, "moaner-groaners" sure do keep us 
on our toes. I have learned to have a sense of humor and enjoy life 
to the fullest. Keep up the comball jokes! 

Thank you, Dad, for showing me these wonderful truths. I 
know I will not only remember them for the rest of my life, but I 
will cherish them and someday pass them on to my children. 
Thankyou and I love you, because 1 realize that even in the tough 
times you've always wanted God's "Best" for my life. 

Thanks for being the kind of Dad that a girl can be proud of 
in every way. 

In Him, 

Charis Edgington 

Fishers, Indiana 



June, 1994 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



Agathe 's letter 

OTN sisters and I were happy to receive the letter you sent me. 
Mrs. Inman, we were very happy to hear your voice in your letter, but 
we would be most happy to see you face-to-face if the Lord would 
permit you to come to Africa. The OTN in Africa have found much joy 
this year. Mrs. Mensinger has helped me very much in the OTN 
program. I beg you to give my greetings to all the WMC ladies in 
America. 

Alice 's letter 

I greet you with much joy in the name of our Savior Jesus Christ I 
thank you so much for the letter and the news that you sent to me. 

I ask if you will pray much for me. It was in 1992 that they 
discovered I had diabetes. This illness has given me a lot of trouble and 
I have had different times of sickness because of it But the Lord 
continues to give me strength to work for him. 

The Lord gave me four children. I have three sons and one 
daughter. My one daughter the Lord took her home to be with him and 
left me with her four children. I have been trying to raise them. They are 
now all in school. 

Please remember to pray much for us. Many missionaries have 
gone home and there aren't many left Only Mme. Mensinger remains 
who works a lot in OTN. We would be so happy if more missionaries 
would come and continue to teach us about the Lord and to help us in 
the work. 

I know that we probably won't see each other here on this earth, 
but I know that we will see one another some day in heaven when the 
Lord returns. 

Please greet very warmly the OTN in America for me. Not only 
me, but all of the OTN in the Central Africian Republic sent their 
greetings to our sisters in the Lord in America. 



Aju oca Ad z- rruc 

LoUSS 



HO? 



lor^ n. 



Jct- 




Mme. Mbaikandji Agathe 
National OTN President 



Mme. Batengai Alice 




Mme. Hibaile Marie 
Helene is the wife of Hibaile 
Augustin, Director of the Bible 
Institute in the CAR. This sum- 
mer he will be completing work 
at Grace Seminary for the Doc- 
tor of Ministries degree and 
Marie Helene, with their three 
youngest children, will be ac- 
companying him to the United 
Stated. The Hibailes' twoolder 
children will remain at home with relatives. 

Marie Helene and her husband plan to attend 
National Conference in Florida and at our conference 
WMC program we want to present her with a generous 
offering to be applied against their shipping expenses 
for books and other items, as they return to the CAR. 

We plan to have a money tree for Marie Helene. 
Will you please send your district offering in a child's 
sock to hang on the tree. 




C HEI^LD 



CE NATIONAL 



There are No Dumb 
Ideas in Outreach! 

The outreach ministry of any church can come in many forms. Some need to 
be subtle and others outrageous. Some need to be usual, and others need to be 
unusual; some need to be comfortable and others challenging. One thing if for 
certain. . . a healthy church needs an outreach ministry. 

This past year the Grace Brethren Church of Ashland, Ohio, was given an 
outreach opportunity that would be usual, challenging, and bordering on outra- 
geous. All sorts of emotions and questions surfaced: Can we attract a thousand 

people for a children 's concert in our small community? Could we really see children and parents come to our Lord through 

something like this? Well, here's the exciting report of what God did! 



#JU 


ip|Ei 


J$h~ 



"He's big, he's blue, and he's here for you-Psalty, 
the Singing Songbook ." So began the latest family- 
oriented outreach ministry at the Ashland, OH, Grace 
Brethren Church. At three o'clock Sunday, March 20, 
the spotlight focused on the blue figure entering the 
back door of the worship center. The worship center 
literally exploded with the joy of 1600 "children" ages 
two months to eighty years. The next hour and a half 
was filled with about as much fun worship as you can 
have this side of heaven. 

The platform came alive with talking "praise boxes" 
filled with puppets that began to SHAKE with praise 
songs to our Lord. Psalty instructed the audience to 
become "doers," not "on-lookers." Everyone joined in 
with singing... and doing... "Sing to the Lord" and 
"Amen, Praise the Lord." 

The children were invited to join Psalty (Ernie 
Rettino) on the platform. Even parents got into the act 
as they joined him on stage for the Bible. Preschoolers 
were invited up to roast marshmallows around a 
campfire as they sang "A Starry Night." 

At the end of the Funtastic Praise Party, everyone 
was given an opportunity to say "yes" to Jesus. 
Another performance was offered at six o'clock with 
nearly 1000 in attendance. Three hundred and fifty- 
plus children responded to the invitation ! GBC stepped 
out in faith. Hours, days, and weeks went into prayer 
and preparation for this celebration of praise. It was 
worth it! 

This opportunity was possible because of the 
efforts of the CE National Children's Cabinet. This 
cabinet began offering an all-Ohio Conference on 



Children in the spring of 1990. It has been hosted by 
the Ashland Grace Brethren Church each year. Ernie 
Rettino, the originator and producer of Psalty, was the 
keynote speaker at the conference that preceded the 
Praise Party by one day. 

This isn't the first time this church has done 
something a little different for family outreach ministry. 
In August, a "Summer Street Fair" was held. Games, 
prizes, and food were provided by ABFs and WMC. 
Smells of popcorn, cotton candy, and stir-fry filled the 
air as families enjoyed a dunking machine, a putting 
green, ring toss, and all the other games associated 
with a street fair. Clowns with helium balloons distrib- 
uted flyers about the church's ministries. This at- 
tracted many from the community who are not attend- 
ing church. 

In December, the gymnasium was transformed 
into the "Family Festival of Christmas." Sixteen 
Christmas trees were decorated to tell the full story of 
Christmas from creation to heaven. Booklets were 
distributed to explain the message of each tree. These 
included Creation, Noah, Joseph, The 10 Plagues, 
Samson, David, Elijah, Daniel, Jesus, Easter, Fishers 
of Men, Fruit of the Spirit, Rapture, and Heaven. 

Outreach is just so much fun! 

If you would like information on any of these ideas, 
please contact the Ashland Grace Brethren Church at 
419-289-8334. 

Written by Nancy Neer 

Children's Education Director 

GBC, Ashland, OH 

Member of CE National Children's Cabinet 



Other church outreach ideas: 

• Children's Neighborhood Bible Clubs • Y 3:30 Club (after-school Bible club in conjunction with YMCA after- 
school child care program) • Monthly Bible study with area National Guard Unit • Jail and Inner-city Ministry • 
Mothers club • Gifts for families of prisoners • Area Pregnancy Center 



June, 1994 



MISSIONS TEAM 



Grace to Go- 

Waterloo Missions Team to Dominican Republic 

During the month of March, 12 Iowans took off with 
a zeal for service. They arrived that same day in Santo 
Domingo, the capital city of the Dominican Republic. 
"Grace to Go! ", a team from the Waterloo Grace Brethren 
Church, went to serve under the ministry of Partner In 
Christ, an independent partnership ministry out of Mansfield, 
Ohio. The director, Carl Key met the team at the customs 
gate and they were quickly on their was to Juan Thomas, a 
village of 4 to 5 thousand people about 15 miles outside the 
populous of Santo Domingo, a city of over 2.5 million in a 
1991 estimate. 

Paul and Linda MacMillan, missionaries and gradu- 
ates of Grace Seminary, have lived in Juan Thomas for 16 
years. Their ministry has been to teach the people how to 
care for themselves, how to find redemption from their sins. 
They have seen few converts over the years, but the ones 
that make the conversion from their native religion, which 
is a mix of Catholicism, Mysticism and Witchcraft, have 
been solid decisions. 

A few years ago, they decided to start a school and the 
children have come out in droves. They currently work with 
some 50 students, teaching them to read and write in 
Spanish, some English, and the Bible. 

Our team went over to assist them in any way that we 
could. In our initial planning, we were hoping to pour a 
cement slab floor to an existing concrete pavilion. It would 
be about 60 ft. by 20 ft. in dimensions. Then we found with 
some more supplies we were able to add a large sidewalk. 
A building foundation had been poured and rods were 
inserted, but the block was yet to be laid. Three of the team 
gave the entire week, along with the help of 3-4 others, and 
completed the block portion of the building. There were 
numerous additions made to the main house on the farm. 
They had added an upstairs, and the master bedroom was 
painted and finished off with trim and linoleum flooring. 
Shelves were built and filing was done for school supplies. 
After arriving, the team decided to make an effort to 
reach the people in spite of the language barriers. The 
people responded well to any effort to communicate with 
them. The team went visiting one evening. On Thursday, a 
Bible study was held and 50 or more people showed up. 
Many were there just to see what our team was doing, but 
it was encouraging to see the villagers come out. There was 

no electricity that 
night, so the ser- 
vice was held by 
a kerosene lamp 
strung to the ceil- 
ing. 

On Friday, 
"Grace to Go!" 
hosted a bonfire 
and testimonies 
were shared as 





well as a gospel 
message. The vil- 
lage come out in 
strong support to 
see something 
"new"in theirvil- 
lage. The follow- 
ing day, people 
were invited out 
for a game of soft- 
ball. Our contacts were limited on a conversational level, 
but we will never know what impact for the Kingdom it will 
have. 

As the team reflected back, our lives were changed, we 
will never forget the friends we made with brothers and 
sisters of another culture. Our understanding of God grew 
as we took one step towards being "world Christians," a 
phrase that we adapted from an article we read in prepara- 
tion for our trip. It was a powerful 10 days in our lives! Our 
God is Great! 

How were we able to go on this trip? We wrote letters, 
asked for prayer support as well as financial support, asked 
for our church' s involvement and met twice a month for 
about 6 months in preparation 
for our trip. It was a significant 
step for our church and the affect 
went far beyond the number of 
the team that travelled. We felt 
the membership of our team in 
our prayer partners, as well as 
our financial support team and 
also those that aided our efforts 
by sending medical supplies , ath- 
letic supplies, clothing and 
school supplies. 



Interview with a member of our Dominican Team: 

Darwin Keeney-a youth worker, husband and father of one: 

"What led you to start considering the transition to a full-time 
Christian worker? 

"It really didn 't start with the trip. I used the trip as a fleece. 
A friend of mine approached me about an opportunity to serve as 
a youth pastor in another area and it got me to start thinking about 
the possibility. 

While we were in the Dominican, we experienced a Haitian 
"wake. " We experienced an eerie feeling most of the night as we 
heard wailing and singing until the wee hours. When a person is 
born, the Haitians sorrow. When they die, they rejoice. The 
Haitians tend to see life as a time of sorrow and pain, rather than 
joy in life. 

Before the trip, my heart was calloused to the reality of our 
Spiritual Conflict. I needed to be jarred into reality, or as the 50- 
Day Spiritual Adventure put it, to "get out of my comfort zone, " 
and see the needs of the world, our country and also our local 
area. This trip has impacted me, but will hopefully impact others 
as well, by God using me in their lives. " 




10 



c HE^iLD 



RESPONSE 



The Brethren Missionary Herald magazine heartily endorses this response to the article in April on foot washing, 
Following in the First Christians' Footsteps 

A Response to 

FOLLOWING IN THE 
FIRST CHRISTIANS' FOOTSTEPS 

By Roger Krynock, Pastor Ireland Road Grace Brethren Church, South Bend, Indiana 



Dr. Ralph Martin wrote an amazing statement in the April, 1 994 
issue of the Brethren Missionary Herald: 

Foot washing is commanded by the Lord, perhaps even more 
strongly than is Communion [by which we assume he means "bread 
and cup" alone]. On grounds of logic and clarity the case is apparently 
irrefutable. 

He then proceeds to refute it on two grounds, 1 ) that the unique 
cultural setting of the foot washing ceremony invalidates it as a 
continuing ordinance for the church, and 2) the "example" that Jesus 
commanded to be perpetuated is not the act of washing feet, but 
"showing kindness to others with cheerfulness" (Romans 1 2:8) and 
performing "humble duties for fellow Christians" (1 Timothy 5:10, 
GNB). 

What a man believes to be the meaning of this passage has 
profound ramifications for what he does with it. Many deprive them- 
selves and those they teach of great blessing. 

Dr. Martin sees the significance of foot washing to be humble 
service to others. But such an interpretation willnotto the context of 
John 13! Our Lord's response to Peter in John 13:7 sheds some 
significant light on the true meaning of foot washing. "You do not 
realize now what I am doing, but later you will understand." That 
statement certainly makes it clear that our Lord was not washing feet 
for the physical cleansing involved. It suggests even more: that it was 
not just an act of "showing kindness to others with cheerfulness," or 
"performing 'humble duties for fellow Christians"' either. For Peter 
certainly realized that what Jesus was doing was humble service. 
That is why he told the Lord, "No. . . you shall never wash my feet" (v. 
8). Our Lord's answer to Peter's protest moves us to the real heart of 
the meaning of Jesus' actions, and the significance of perpetuating 
foot washing: Jesus answered, "Unless I wash you, you have no part 
with me." What does it mean to have part with the Lord? As the word 
is used elsewhere in Scripture it means "to have a share with others, 
or participation with others." Even though Peter's motives may have 
been commendable, his refusal meant that he could have no part, no 
fellowship with Christ. 

Peter's impetuous response gives the Lord opportunity to 
explain further the significance of His actions. This very important 
section of John 1 3 Dr. Martin does not even mention. Yet it is certainly 
the key to the meaning of what Jesus did. The contrast that Jesus 
makes is between the one who has bathed [O kzhov heuos] yet has 
need only to wash his feet [ouk e/ei xp £l0tv £l l*n tons r)o6as 
vuj>aa9ai]. What does Jesus mean by this? Jesus indicated that 
what he did had symbolic significance when he added "And you are 
clean, though not every one of you." John's added explanation, "For 
he knew who was going to betray him, and that was why he said not 
every one was clean" confirms that the bath/foot washing has 
spiritual significance. As many competent Bible teachers have pointed 
out, the unrepeatable bath can only refer to the initial act of salvation 
with its accompanying forgiveness of sin. The foot washing, then, 
must be symbolic of a spiritual reality in the life of the believer. And 
as Jesus' conversation with Peter makes clear, it is a necessary act 



for continuing fellowship (to have a part) with Jesus. 

It must be asked, how does Peter's submission to the Lord's 
washing of his feet give him fellowship with Christ //the meaning of 
Jesus' act is humility or as Dr. Martin maintains "showing kindness to 
others with cheerfulness," or "performing humble duties for fellow 
Christians?" If the lesson that the Lord intended the disciples to learn 
that night was humility and showing kindness, we would expect 
Jesus' directive to have been, "Unless you learn to 'wash others' feet' 
you have no part with Me." Jesus' expectation would be that Peter 
learn obedience to His requirement of serving others. Obedience to 
His will would then maintain fellowship, but how does Jesus' lesson 
of humble service give Peter fellowship with Christ? That question 
must be answered. However, Jesus' statement actually was, "Unless 
/ wash you, you have no part with me." That leads us to conclude that 
the meaning of the action lay in what Jesus did. 

There was no merit in the act of washing itself. That is clear from 
the fact that Judas' feet were also washed; however, there was no 
cleansing for Judas, no fellowship with Christ. That is clear from the 
text of John 1 3:21 -30! The significance of the act lay in the fact that 
it symbolized Jesus' cleansing from sin for His true followers. 

Dr. Martin has missed the heart of it all! By reducing the meaning 
to humility and kindness to others, perpetuating the act of foot 
washing is ludicrous! However, when the real meaning of Jesus' act 
is identified, then the practice of the act as an ordinance becomes 
powerfully filled with importance. Jesus commands that believers 
"should wash one another's feet." The word translated shouldin the 
NIV (ought in the KJV), is a word that means to owe, be indebted, be 
obligated, and can be translated, one must, one ought, one is under 
obligation to. 

What must the believer do? He cannot do what foot washing 
symbolizes, namely cleanse others from sin. The only thing that he 
can do, is to wash feet as a visible reminder of our Lord's ministry. Just 
as when he eats the bread and drinks the cup of communion he does 
not atone for sin himself, but proclaims the Lord's death until He 
comes. 

Furthermore, Jesus claims that He has given us an example 
that we are to follow. The word our Lord used, imo&EiYfia 
(hupodeigma) means an example for imitation, a pattern, a model. 
Yjio&e iY(ia (hupodeigma) is the Greek word that conveys the idea 
of an example in which the action is to be physically repeated. Again, 
it should be clear that since the believer cannot repeat that which foot 
washing symbolizes, cleansing from sin in the heart of the believer, 
the only example that he can repeat is the washing of feet, repeating 
the symbol, not the reality to which it points. 

Jesus closes His admonitions to wash feet by saying, "Now that 
you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them." The 
Brethren people have sought to do just that. We do not perpetuate 
some outdated Palestinian cultural practice that has no relevance for 
twentieth century believers! We remember, by actual observance of 
foot washing, the powerfully effective present ministry of the Lord 
Jesus Christ! 



June, 1994 



11 



Using Peopfes Gifts 



Don Cousins 



Having grown up in a strong evangelical church, 
I was privileged to receive solid biblical teaching for 
the first eighteen years of my life. So it seems strange 
to even admit that I didn't hear about spiritual gifts 
until I went away to college. 

During my freshman year, I received a long letter 
from a friend that contained a thorough description 
and explanation of spiritual gifts. After reading it, I 
had two immediate and almost simultaneous reac- 
tions. The first was, "Wow-every believer has been 
given a divine ability to make a difference in God's 
kingdom. This is revolutionary! " My second thought 
was, "Why haven't I heard of this before? I can't 
believe that I've sat for eighteen years in a Bible- 
teaching church and never really heard any of this. 
It 's unbelievable! " 

I had never received an explanation of spiritual 
gifts, much less seen their application in the church. 
Although I didn't realize it at the time this new 
understanding would greatly impact my future life 
and ministry. 

During that freshman year in college, I decided to 
pursue a career in ministry. I returned home to the 
Chicagoland area and joined my old friend Bill Hybels, 
and a handful of other people, in planting Willow 
Creek Community Church. For seventeen years, I 
served on Willow Creek staff, a church well known 
for its unwavering commitment to reaching unsaved 
people with the Gospel. Though Willow Creek has 
received significant attention for its evangelistic ef- 
fectiveness, it should receive equal attention for its 
unwavering commitment to "gift-based" ministry. 

At a leadership retreat, some of us evaluated the 
church. We unanimously agreed that our volunteer 
staff was one of the church's greatest strengths. Why? 
Our people had discovered and were exercising their 
spiritual gifts. The result? A divinely empowered 



volunteer army for God. It's no exaggeration to say 
the Willow Creek would not be the church it is today 
were it not for the volunteers who make it run. 

Valuing People's Gifts 

From day one, we placed a value on helping 
believers discover their divine giftedness. The result 
has been multifaceted. First of all, those believers are 
bearing fruit-making a difference in building the 
body of Christ. Secondly, they are fulfilled. They 
walk around with joy in their hearts and a sense of 
deep satisfaction, knowing that what they are doing 
really matters and is making a difference. Thirdly, 
they are faithful over time. They keep serving-year 
after year after year. In fact, the church has more 
problems with people burning out due to over-in- 
volvement than it does with people saying, "I've 
grown tired of this," "I don't want to do it anymore," 
or "This bores me." 

Putting People to Work 

In addition to that volunteer army, the impact of 
spiritual giftedness has been the development of the 
paid staff. You ask, "What do you mean?" I mean that 
the majority of the non-clerical staff at Willow Creek 
are homegrown-they have been raised up from within 
the congregation. 

Many people, while employed elsewhere, got a 
taste of what it meant to be used of God in the church. 
Their gifts were identified and they began to exercise 
them. Those gifts were empowered by the Holy Spirit, 
and the result was a divine sort of impact. In many 
cases, people reacted to that impact with, "We want 
more of this!" The more they tasted of difference- 
making, the more they wanted to taste it. No thrill 
surpasses the thrill of seeing God use our lives to make 
a difference. 



12 



C HEI^LD 



As we watched God's work going on through 
some of these people, we would say to each other, 
"We need to give these people jobs (as secretaries, 
graphic designers, program coordinators, etc.) so they 
can do this more often. They're making an incredible 
impact in five, ten, or fifteen hours a week, but think 
if they had forty or fifty hours a week through which 
to really employ their gifts! " In many cases, we went 
to them and said, "We'd like to give you an office, a 
salary, and a job description that allows you to use 
your gift full-time. " 

Making a Difference 

Don't underestimate the significance of your role 
as the Sunday school teacher, youth leader, pastor, or 
other Christian education worker-many of the people 
who sit around you are in the dark concerning God's 
gifting for them. While they've heard many good 
messages, many may be ignorant or confused about 
the role of spiritual gifts in their lives. They don't 
really understand what it's all about and have not yet 
tasted of the power of giftedness in action. Here's 
some helpful tips on how you can make a difference 
for them: 

1. Help people see God as a personal God. God 
is so personal that He has given each of us at least one 
gift. I Corinthians 12: 1 1 says, "all these [gifts] are the 
work of one and the same Spirit, and He gives them to 
each one, just as He determines." Our God is so 
personal that through His Holy Spirit, He assigns gifts 
to individual believers with the intent that they make 
a specific contribution to the body of Christ. Make it 
your goal to have people see God that way and 
worship Him for being so. 

2. Help people discover their gift(s), Teach with 
such passion and clarity that the people in your group 
will actually discover their gifts and are motivated to 
use them. Pray over your material. Pray for the people. 
Pray for discernment, wisdom, and insight as it relates 
to each one of them as individuals. Teach with enthu- 
siasm. Explain and illustrate each gift with a relevant 
application. When you draw a clear picture of each 
gift in action, people will say, "That's me! " or "That's 
not me. " It's your job to help every person discover his 
or her own gift(s) ! 

3. Help people find a place to try their gifts. Like 
a football coach who uses a chalkboard and "X's" and 
"O's" to explain the gifts. Then, take your players to 



the field to play. The game's not won in the locker 
room; it's won on the field. It's on the field that God, 
others, and you have the opportunity to affirm or deny 
the presence of a specific gift. This means being 
willing to follow up each individual in your group, 
long after your time together is completed. 

4. Affirm people' s gift-based ministries. Watch, 
observe, and when they have finished their gift-based 
assignments, step back in. Talk with them and ask, 
"Did you sense God using your life for this purpose? 
Do you feel fulfilled? Did you enjoy it? Do you want 
to do it again?" At the same time, give your objective 
opinion. Your honest affirmation or denial of their 
gifts in action is extremely important. If there's doubt 
in your mind and theirs, encourage them to experi- 
ment again. If there's no doubt, encourage them to 
continue and develop their gifts with the hope of even 
greater impact. 

If you facilitate each person's walk through those 
four steps of seeing God as a personal God, discover- 
ing a specific gift, trying that gift, and then affirming 
it, then you have done them, the church, and God a 
great service. It's my guess that along the way you'll 
taste the flavor of difference yourself, and you'll 
return to taste it again and again. 

Don Cousins was on the ministerial staff at Wil- 
low Creek Community Church for seventeen years 
and founded Team Development, Inc., a non-profit 
organization to assist church leadership in ministry. 

Printed by permission of David C. Cook Church 
Ministries Group, 850 N. Grove Ave, Elgin IL60120 




Jl.atL 

"FORTY YEARS WE\? BEEN WANDERING IN THE 
WILDERNESS. AND THE KJDS ARE STtU ASKJNG. 
'ARE WE THERE YET7~ Sei Nuumb 1*26-3:3. 

From Biblical Cartoons. Dwight Allen Jr., cartoonist 
George W. Knight, compiler. Baker Book House, 1993 



June, 1994 



13 



Charles Swindoll is leaving his church in Fullerton, California and moving to Nashville, Tennessee. 
This is a farewell letter that he wrote to his church concerning his retirement. We tlwught the wisdom 
contained in the letter was of value to our Herald readers. 



Stuff I've Learned 



by Chuck Swindoll 

Several weeks ago somebody sent me a 
cute article from some newspaper. A 
class of fifth graders at Red Oak School 
had submitted the things they had 
learned. Here is a sampling from their 
gems of wisdom: 

• I've learned the difference between dog food and 
meatballs. 

• I've learned that you don't have serious relationships 
with boys until you're... 15. 

• I've learned that if you eat cheese cake and laugh 
hard enough, it will come out your nose. 

• I've learned that even the smartest person is not 
always right. 

• I've learned never to take a picture of a baby on a 
table because it will roll right off (and cry a lot). 

• I've learned life is not fair. 

• I've learned not to eat tons of chili and play bowling. 

• I've learned that hamsters can eat through a paper 
bag. 

• I' ve learned that batteries are explosive when dropped 
off a bridge. 

• I've learned if you don't feed a bird at least every 
week it will die. 

• I've learned to stop at corners on my bike because 
once I was six inches from a car. 

Within a matter of days, I will wrap up almost 23 
years as pastor of the same church. Having arrived 
when I was 36 and leaving when I am a few months 
shy of 60, I've realized lately that my learning curve 
has continued throughout the journey. I'm grateful for 
that. I'm glad the lessons don't stop at age 45 or once 
you have your last child or when you preach your 
thirty-second Easter sermon. 

And so. . . while starting to gather up my thoughts 
toward the end of this memorable pilgrimage, it oc- 
curred to me that there has been some pretty important 



stuff I've learned since the summer of '71. In no 
particular order, here is a sampling from the stack that 
has been building over the years. 

• I've learned that I should tell people how I feel 
about them now, not later. Later seldom comes. 
Furthermore, death has a way of making all commu- 
nication one-sided. Many times as I have walked 
away from a funeral, I've wished I had told the 
deceased why I admired her or him... or what I 
appreciated... or how much I'd been helped. 

• I've learned that things I'm not even aware of are 
being noticed and remembered. You wouldn't be- 
lieve the things folks have mentioned over the years 
that have encouraged them. A smile. A glance. An 
arm over the shoulder. A song sung loudly. A tear. 
Laughter. It's really true: small things mean a lot... 
which can be a little scary. 

• I've learned that being real is a lot better than 
looking pious. You don't need to worry about making 
a good impression. You don't live under a pile of guilt 
because you're not perfect. Authenticity keeps you 
from gettin' your underwear in a wad over petty stuff 
that legalists expect. Being holy is biblical and right. 
Trying to look holy stinks. 

• I've learned that when you "fit," most thing 
flow. ..they don't have to be forced. From the day I 
walked into the lives of this flock at Woods and 
Malvern (our church's former site) I felt at home. 
Didn't have to fake it or act excited when I wasn't or 
hold back my opinion or hide my style. I fit, right off 
the bat. For almost 23 years I can't remember having 
to force something to work. 

• I've learned that it doesn't pay to talk someone 
into or out of a big decision. We need to let people be. 
Pushing or pulling creates complications and conse- 
quences. Looking back, I can recall a few times I put 
added pressure on individuals to get them to say yes or 



14 



c HEf^LD 



no and invariably regretted it. The old gospel song is 
still true: God is able to lead His dear children along. 

• I've learned that days of maintenance are far 
more in number than days of magnificence. Over 
half of any job is just showing up. Staying faithful 
pays great dividends. Waiting for the big-time tingles 
to occur is a waste. And answering "Fantastic! " every 
time somebody asks how you're doing is phony. Most 
days call for little more than the discipline of staying 
with the stack. 

• I've learned that some people aren't going to 
change, no matter what. This used to drive me nuts; 
no longer. It was a great moment in my life when I 
realized I couldn't win 'em all... in fact, I can't even 
fix those who wish I could. And so, I've learned to 
lighten up. It's a full-time job taking care of the logs 
in my own eyes. 

• I've learned that I have seldom felt badly for 
things I did not say. This business of the tongue-Mg/z/ 
Occasionally, I have shown unusual restraint and held 
back. Later, I've been pleased I did. Talking too much 
is never wise. I really mean never. 

• I've learned that perception overshadows reality. 
I hate that. . . but it's a fact. How people perceive things 
is, to them, more convincing than a truckload of 
evidence. Unfortunately, most draw their opinions 
from the shallow stream of perception instead of the 
deep reservoir of truth. I find that strange and disap- 
pointing. 

• I've learned that time spent with my family is a 
good investment. The older I get the more I treasure 
those early-morning talks with my wife. . . the friend- 
ship, love and counsel of our now-grown 
"children"... the acceptance, hugs and kisses of the 
grandkids. God did a winning thing when He came up 
with the idea of moms, dads, kids and their kids. Home 
is still my favorite place to be. 

• I've learned that grace is worth the risk. I know, 
I know... rules, regulations, policies and procedures 
are helpful boundaries-and necessary-at times. But 
the freedom of living by grace is still the lifestyle to 
pursue. Grace relieves guilt and shame. Grace smiles, 
"You're forgiven." Grace helps me sing and skip 
through life with hardly a care. It also reminds me to 
release others from expectations. But, won't some 
take advantage of it? Yea. It's still worth it. 

• I've learned to stop saying "never" or "always" 
when it comes to the future. Change happens. De- 



tours and unexpected curves and dead-end streets and 
quiet rest areas are all part of this journey called life. 
Your map may seem both infallible and indelible. 
Don't kid yourself. The Lord reserves the right to do 
reprints. 

• I've learned that thinking theologically pays off, 
big time. It's taken me years to stop reacting emotion- 
ally and let God be God. Being sovereign, He has a 
plan that is unfolding whether I like it or not. . . whether 
I understand it or not. When I interpret my circum- 
stances with that in mind, peace and calm kick in, 
replacing panic and resistance. 

• I've learned that some things are worth the sweat. 
Not most things. Often, not the big and bold things. 
But intangible things. Like telling the truth. And 
admitting inadequacy. And emphasizing quality. And 
expressing gratitude. And saying "I'm sorry." And 
being generous. And studying hard. And demonstrat- 
ing affection. And loving God. 

• I've learned that you can't beat fun. Folks who 
relax and refuse to take themselves so seriously are 
contagious. They're easier to be around than those 
who look like they're holding their breath under 
water. One of my great goals for the future is to have 
more fun, to be less intense, to laugh louder and more 
often. Can't think of many things worse than becom- 
ing a grimfaced old jerk lugging around a big thick 
Bible, yelling at people from a pulpit. Jesus didn't. . . I 
shouldn't. 

• Finally, I've learned to give credit where credit is 
due. This is where you come in. I'm a better man 
today than I was at age 36. Thanks to you... and 
you. . . and you. If sermons have improved, you get a 
lot of that credit. You listened and spurred me on to 
preach better. If I'm more myself than I once was, it's 
mainly because you've let me be. You've encouraged 
that. If the ministry has grown and become more 
effective, again, you've made it happen. You have 
invested your time and energy, your money and com- 
mitment. Thank you-each one of you-for being so 
affirming, so supportive, so unselfish. 

One thing I haven 7 learned is where I'm going to 
park when I come back for a visit. 



Reprinted by permission 

First Evangelical Free Church, 

Fullerton, California 



June, 1994 



15 



SPORTS 



Athletes Who Are 
Leading By 
Example 



met, Mast opens up his wallet for other 
people. He winds up giving away at least 
1 percent of what he earns. On top of that, 
his giving is often a labor of love. Mast 
describes it as a gift, a natural desire that 
also includes mercy and serving. 



M Dick Mast 

Swinging For 
The Green 




COURTESY SAM GREENWOOD/PGA TOUR 



If you're a top professional golfer, 
you're going to make money. Lots of 
money. More money than you know what 
to do with. And if you have any touch 
whateveron the greens, you're going to be 
swimming in green. 

Such is the story of Dick Mast, pro- 
fessional Golfer. At age 42, he is not one 
of your more well-known players. But 
Mast cashes checks. By virtue of his status 
on the Professional Golf Association's 
Pro Tour, Mast brings big bucks back to 
his home in Orlando. He's keen on the 
greens, ranking seventh overall in putting 
in 1993. So the dough flows. 

Mast had his best year on the tour in 
1993, checking in at No. 82 on the money 
list He pocketed $2 10, 125. Butthenagain, 
he didn't really pocket it You see, Mast 
has a purpose for earning this money-a 
purpose that doesn't entirely revolve 
around his bank account When the needs 
of his wife. Roberta, and sons, Richard, 
Joshua, Caleb, Jonathan, and Jacob are 



"I abused that gift earlier in my Chris- 
tian walk," Mast says. "If a street person 
came up and wanted a dollar, I gave him a 
20. You leam to meet the need and not the 
want Our main purpose for working is to 
meet others' needs." 

Mast knows all about working to 
meet needs. His golfing career is marked 
by years of hard work Billed as "The Ki ng 
of the Mini-Tour," Mast knows what it's 
like to skid off the PGA Tour. He lost his 



"1 had a peace of mind, 
and a tremendous weight 
was lifted off my shoulders. 



playingcardfourtimesfrom 1975through 
1980, and he had to fight his way off the 
Ben Hogan Tour with three victories in 
1990. Before losing his card again in 
1989, he earned $128,568 on the 1988 



PGA Tour. Goi ng into 1 994, he had earned 
a total of $736,303 on the Tour. "I've 
worked as hard as I can," he says. 

His struggles have made Mast more 
sensitive to the plight of lesser-known 
golfers. Instead of talking about Fred 
Couples, Raymond 
Floyd, Tom Kite, or 
Tom Watson, Mast is 
more likely to talk 
about R i k 

Massengale. He re- 
membered how 
Massengale, a fellow 
Christian, injured his 
back and received 
only a few invitations 
to speak in churches. 
"B ut he saw hundreds 
of lives affected be- 
cause of how they 
could relate to a guy 
with problems. He 
shared honestly how 
the Lord's grace was 
sufficient Thatreally 
ministered to 
people." 

Through one of 
his many problems- 
losing his PGA card 
for the first time- 
Mast trusted Jesus 
Christ as his Savior, 
in 1975. "I became 
bom again. I had a 
peace of mind, and a 
tremendous weight 
was lifted off my shoulders," he recalls. 
"I was obsessed with golf. 1 had tried 
everything the world offered. I lived, ate, 
and breathed golf. But that's what broke 
me. When I didn't reach the goal I had set 
I was pretty much devastated by it That's 
when the Lord was able to reach me." 

When "The King of the Mini-Tour" 
has a personal encounter with "The King 
of Kings," the golfer was able to grow in 
the understanding that he could help a lot 
of people. For him, that means giving. 
From the street person in need of a dollar 
to the golfer in need of a few tips, people 
from all walks of life can count on Mast to 
be helpful. 

"I've been able to comfort a lot of 
golfers," says the pro who swings for the 
green so he can give to others 

-Allen Pahneri 

REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF 

Sports Spectrum 



16 



"HEF^LD 



Fatherless families fuel crime explosion 



By Don Feder 
Creator's Sundicate, Inc. 



■ Nothing in a child's life can substitute for the love 
and caring involvement of a father. 

Three words are conspicuously absent from the crime 
debate: illegitimacy and fatherless families . Ulti 
mately, nothing will succeed unless we address the 
familial antecedents of the crime contagion. 

The Senate is debating the latest crime control bill. It 
enacts one of these every two or three years. Each has the 
impact of a hiccup in a hurricane. 

The latest performance of "Watch Washington Fight 
Crime" (production costs-$22.3 billion) includes appro- 
priations of $8.9 billion to help cities hire more police and 
$3 billion for 10 high-security prisons. 

Liberals get their favorite form of voodoo crime con- 
trol-a five-day waiting period for handgun purchases. For 
conservatives, the death penalty is extended to a host of 
federal crimes. 

Nothing succeeds like failure. There are four times as 
many inmates today as 20 years ago. During the same 
period, law enforcement expenditures have increased sev- 
enfold. Over 90% of the guns used by criminals are ob- 
tained illegally, and thus beyond the purview of waiting 
periods, license laws and the like. 

Public anxiety about crime isn't paranoia. The FBI 
estimates that 83% of Americans will be victims at some 
point in their lives. From 1976to 1993, more of our citizens 
were murdered in their native land than died on the battle- 
fields of Europe and in the Pacific during World War II. 

But solutions, from both sides of the spectrum, ignore 
an essential reality: At the heart of the crime problem lies 
a family crisis. According to a study published in the 
Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, the best 
indicator of violent crime in a community isn' t race or 
income or employment but the proportion of fatherless 
families. 

Today, 15 million children are growing up in house- 
holds without fathers-collectively, they constitute fission- 
able material. The inner cities are already well past critical 
mass, with illegitimacy approaching 80% in these areas. 

The Family Research Council cites an impressive 
array of data on the connection between fatherless families 
and crime, studies of violent rapists (60% from single- 
parent households), adolescent murderers (72% with di- 
vorced or never-married mothers) and juveniles in long- 
term correctional facilities (70% did not live with their 
fathers growing up). 

It' s not just a black problem-not any more. Among 
whites, the illegitimacy rate is 22%. Sociologist Charles 
Murray notes that whites today are about where black 
families were in the mid-' 60s, when Daniel Patrick 



Moynihan wrote his famous report predicting chaos in the 
community unless something was done fast to shore up 
black families. It wasn' t, and now 68% of black children are 
born out-of-wedlock and blacks are six times as likely as 
whites to commit crimes. 

In many intact families, the father is physically present 
but emotionally AWOL. In a 1990 Los Angeles Times poll, 
57% of fathers said they feel guilty about spending too little 
time with their children. Compared to 1965, families spend 
40% less time on child care. 

A welfare payment or child support check can only 
replace a man's financial contribution. Boys in particular 
need decent men as role models-men who teach by ex- 
ample and talk to them about values and virtue. The 
alternative is what Murray calls the "Lord of the Flies"ethic 
of adolescent males left to their own devices. 

As a society, we must encourage men to fulfill their 
primary function. The Family Research Council is running 
a series of ads emphasizing the importance of fathering. 
One shows a man helping his small son hammer a nail in a 
birdhouse, with the caption: 'The biggest building project 
he'll ever tackle is right in his own backyard." 

Above all, we must stop paying single women to have 
children by closing the AFDC rolls to new appli cants. Prior 
to the advent of the welfare state, female headed house- 
holds weren' t economically viable. Thanks to Big Brother, 
the child-rearing arrangement celebrated by Murphy Brown 
at last may be economically feasible but remains dysfunc- 
tional. 

Babies are cute and cuddly, and many immature young 
women want one to fill the loneliness gap of failed relation- 
ships. The knowledge that they'll be on their own might 
cause them to either think twice before taking a tumble or 
pick a man more likely to stay with them after the storks 
come home to roost. This may be insensitive to the children 
involved (who, after all, didn't ask to be born in these 
circumstances), but anything we can do to reduce the 
number of fatherless children inflicted on society will be far 
less cruel in the long run. 

In June, Randy Ertman buries his 14-year-old daughter 
Jennifer Lee, one of two teenaged girls raped and murdered 
by six young gang members in Houston. At the funeral, he 
made an impassioned plea: "The problem with the youth of 
America starts in the home. So, parents, please be there for 
your children, always. "That' s a far better long-term invest- 
ment than billions spent on police and prisons, as necessary 
as those stopgap measures may be to handle the current 
crisis. 

Reprinted by permission of 
American Family Association 



June, 1994 



17 



HERALD NEWSLINE/FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



IrftmlA J%etv&line 



Tremendous potential - "We have a total of 42 people studying the 
evangelism course taught in the local churches," reports Bruce 
TriplehornfromBelem, Brazil. "Oneoftherequirementsforthiscourse 
is that each person needs to complete a seven week evangelistic 
Bible study with an unbeliever, If we can get most of the600 believers 
in Belem mobilized to have evangelistic studies with their unsaved 
friends, th e resu Its will be tremendous! " 

Summer is approaching and the Solihull, England GBC is preparing 
for the arrival of a TIME team in June. "We'll be asking permission for 
them to do assemblies in schools, and we're planning an itinerary 
that will enhance their understanding of what church planting in our 
community involves," writes Bill Kiddoo. 

Yes, we still have ties with Alamo Rent A Car. They have great rates, 
especially in Florida. Of your total cost 5% is rebated to National 
Ministerium. When you call for a reservation (1 -800-354-2322) be sure 
tomentionourcode: "BY" 93451 toreceivetheproper discount, and 
we will receive the proper rebate. Thanks! 

Hope, New Jersey Grace Brethren Church will celebrate their 20th 
anniversary on Sunday, June 5. Their first Bible study began in May 
1 974. Terry Taylor, theinitial pastor of the church whonowpastorsthe 
Canton Ohio GBC, will be the guest speaker in the morning worship 
service. Currently serving as pastor is Larry Gegner. Larry is a BMH 
board member. 

A prayer request from Cecil 0' Dell in Tokyo, Japan . " Please pray for 
Tokyo Grace Brethren Church this week as we prepare for an 
evangelistic concert and invite folks to study the Bible. Our guest 
speaker, Pastor Furiyama, was the translator for Billy Graham when 
he was here in January. Cecil notes: 'We are praising God for the 
increased interest of Japanese folks wanting to study the Bible with 



us. Wehavel6groups with 43 folksattending each week, 60 percent 
of whom are not yet Christians." Three people were baptized in the 
Tokyo GBC in February. 

Tom Stallter writes from Chad, "The Chadian church seems to be 
moving ahead at a rapid pace in spite of general poverty and 
national insecurity. Their new teamwork with Grace Brethren in the 
U.S. has opened a door to their future. Chadian pastors and other 
church leaders are beginning to see their association of churches 
take on a more developed and stronger ministry. There is a feeling 
of excitement about what God is going to do here," 

Here is an action taken at the Michigan District Conference: I am 
writing to inform you that on April 9, 1994, the Michigan District 
Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churchespassed thefollowing motion: 
Whereas it is being declared that the FGBC is a 'fellowship of 
churches rather than a fellowship of districts" and the Michigan 
District of Grace Brethren Churches can no longer be recognized as 
a "cooperating district" in the FGBCbecausenot all Districtchurches 
are ",. .member churches in good standing with the Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches, Inc.": Wemove that theMichigan District 
of Grace Brethren Churches continues to cooperate and function 
as a district, without national recognition from the FGBC, and that 
individual churches of the District be encouraged to fellowship with 
the national organizations of their choosing. 
Therefore, as the motion states, the Michigan District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches, as of the above date, April 9, 1994, no 
longer desires national recognition from the Fellowship of Grace 
Brethren Churches, 

On behalf of the Michigan District Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches, 

Pastor Alan Myers 
District Secretary 



Death Notices 

Omega Hartman Sandy, 76 of Winona Lake, Indiana passed on to her heavenly home on 
Saturday, April 23. She had served with her husband, A. Rollin Sandy who pastored the 
Sidney, Indiana Grace Brethren Church for many years. She was a secretary-typesetter 
for theBrethrenMissionaryHeraldCompanyfor 35 years. In God'sgood timing a son Brent, 
co-pastor of the Ghent GBC in Roanoke, Virginia and his wife Cheryl had just spent the 
week with her. God took her home with a heart attack as Brent and Cheryl were bidding 
farewell. Survivors include two sons, Brent of Salem, Virginia and Dean of Winona Lake; 
two grandsons, four brothers and one sister. Rev. Earl Futch officiated at the funeral 
service. 

Anna Z. Angle, 93, a resident of Hagerstown, Maryland and a charter member of 
Maranatha Brethren Church, went home to be with her Lord on December 1, 1993. She 
was a testimony of faithfulness to us all. Jay M. Fretz, Pastor. 

Paul Miller, 78, went to be with his Lord on May 14, 1994. He was a long time member of 
Bethel Brethren Church in Berne, Indiana. Pastor Robert Griffith. 



Address Changes: 

Walker Road Grace Brethren Church 

980 N.W. 180th 

Beaverton, OR 97006 

Mifflin Grace Brethren Church 
c/oAlan Channell 
757 Main St., Route 5, Bailey Lakes 
Ashland, OH 44805 

Name Changes: 

San Bernardino Grace Brethren Church 

to: Mountainside Community Church 

Timothy J. Ruesch is the new pastor at 
London, Ohio Grace Brethren Church. 

Remove from list of Fellowship of 

Grace Brethren Churches 

(no longer a member): 

Jenners, Pennsylvania 

Ankenytown, Ohio 

Mill Run GBC, Westernport, Maryland 



18 



C HEI^LD 



GRADUATION PRAYER 



Rutherford Institute tells public school 
ACLU is wrong about graduation prayer 

To counter widespread confusion and misinformation about prayer at public school graduation exercises, The 
Rutherford Institute sent a letter to public school superintendents across the nation, outlining the law on graduation prayer 

"Many superintendents erroneously believe-and have been advised by such groups as the American Civil Liberties 
Union-that the seminal case on this issue, Lee v. Weisman, means they can't allow student-initiated prayer at graduation 
exercises," said RitaWoltz, educational coordinator for The Rutherford Institute. 

The Rutherford Institute wrote the letter to explain that Weisman only held that school-endorsed prayer at graduation, 
and not student-initiated prayer, is unconstitutional Student-initiated prayer remains specifically protected under the First 
Amendment. 

The letter also quoted the recently enacted Education Reform Act which makes clear the intent of Congress to protect 
student-initiated prayer According to the law, "no funds authorized to be appropriated under [the] Act may be used by any 
State or local educational agency to adopt policies that prevent voluntary prayer and meditation in public schools." 

According to the letter, "schools which specifically prevent student-initiated prayer not only currently risk suits for 
constitutional violations, but also risk forfeiture of federal funds after July 1 , 1994." 

"There are many options available to the school which would be in accord with Leev Weisman and other case law While 
problems might arise with student-invited clergy, certainly student speech should be defended as it is still constitutionally 
protected," stated the letter. 

The Rutherford Institute receives many calls regarding the issue of graduation prayer "We're trying to prevent additional 
instances of student rights violations this year," said Woltz. 

The Rutherford institute is an international, nonprofit civil liberties organization specializing in the defense of religious 
liberty For more information, contact Educational Coordinator RitaWoltz, at (804) 978-3888. 

cST/ 



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Reading Books 



1994-1995 
Live in God's Kindness 

by Marguerite G. Dunning 

French Equatorial Africa was largely unexplored in January, 1918, when James and Florence Gribble, with their little 
daughter Marguerite and two other ladies sailed from new Orleans to open a part of that vast area to the Gospel. 
Marguerite survived four perilous years there, grew up to marry Harold Dunning and, with him and their three daugh- 
ters served 25 years in that same country. Now you can experience the thrill of those early years as Marguerite 
describes them in her book Live in God's Kindness. Reviewed by Mary Thompson. 



.-■Win 



When God Doesn't Make Sense 

by Dr. James Dobson 

What is faith? What does it mean to trust God? How do faith and trust figure in when life is topsy-turvy, crummy and 
totally confusing? Where are the answers to all those nagging questions? Is God really there and does He care? 

Our reasoning and intellect are incapable of producing answers, "but valid answers always exist." They are God's 
answers. "He will not parade His plans and purposes for our approval. We must never forget that He is God. He wants 
us to believe and trust in Him despite the things we don't understand." 

I recommend this book for anyone-before during, or after one of life's totally confusing happenings. Reviewed by 
Miriam Pacheco. 




The Women of Catawba 

by Hilda Stahl 

This historical novel tells of a young widow and her adventures as she comes to America by ship from England in 
1800. She had some interesting experiences on the ship and through some good and bad experiences ended up at 
Catawba, a plantation in its beginning stages near Charleston, South Carolina. Throughout the book the main characters 
displayed a love for the Lord and a complete dependence on Him through prayer and guidance in every situation. 
Reviewed by Lillian Teeter. 



WMC Suggested Reading Books 
Order Form 1994-1995 



□ Live in God's Kindness 
@ $9.95 

□ When God Doesn't Make Sense 
@ $17.99 

Q The Women of Catawba 
@ $9.99 

□ Purchase all three WMC books for 
the special price of $35.00. We pay 
shipping charges when payment is sent 
with order. 



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Above prices subject to change if book publishers increase prices. 
If only one book is ordered, please add $1.85 for shipping. 



For other WMC literature use the WMC order blank. Send it to the WMC literature secretary. 

Send this book order to: Brethren Missionary Herald 

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Or order by phone at: 1-800-348-2756 (between 8:00-5:00 Eastern Standard Time) 



GUEST EDITORIAL 



Sight or Vision? 



H 



elen Keller was asked, "What could be wofs? 
than being blind?" She replied, "Having sight - 
but no vision!" 

That may describe the condition of our Fellow- 
ship in recent years. We have seen theological issues. 
We have seen moral decay in our society. We have 
seen millions in this world who are without Christ. 
But we have lacked vision. 

Many years ago, Robert Kennedy put it this way, 
"Some people look at the way things are and ask 
'why? Others look at the way things could be and ask 
why not?" I choose to look at our Fellowship and ask, 
"Why. nor 

Why not ask God to give us a fresh vision of His 
glory? Why not ask God to give us a glimpse of how 
we can touch the world for Christ? Why not ask God 
to show our Fellowship of Churches where we "fit" in 
the great things He's doing around the world? 

John Maxwell said, "One of life's greatest trag- 
edies is a person with a 10x12 capacity and a 2x4 soul." 
Perhaps the FGBC has struggled in recent years be- 
cause we have been guilty of a 2x4 soul. We've needed 
a new perspective on who God is. We've needed a 
fresh view of our standing before Him. We've desper- 
ately needed a fresh touch from His Spirit. 

I've been praying God will "enlarge the soul" of 
the FGBC. We need a new passion for what God can 
do through our efforts. I believe God is creating in the 
hearts of our people across this country that new 
passion. The 1993-94 FOCUS retreats have helped to 
ignite a new vision for who we are and where we're 
going. 

I'm excited to introduce to you the FOCUS 2000 
goals for our Fellowship. These goals may become the 
focal point that helps us determine what progress 
we're making for the Kingdom in the years ahead. 
Would you join me in praying that God enable us to 
accomplish through His power these "FOCUS 2000 
WORLDWIDE GOALS?" 

1) Expand to 2000 churches 

2) Enlist 20,000 people in a prayer network for 
world evangelization 



3) Enlist a team of 350 church-planting mission- 
aries 

4) Celebrate 100,000 conversions to Jesus Christ 

5) Establish international partnership in reach- 
ing unreached people groups 

6) Establish an international communication 
network for reporting progress of our goals 

I realize these are lofty goals. They cannot be 
accomplished in our own strength. I agree with the 
man, however, 
who said, "Only 
he who sees the 
invisible can do 
the impossible." 
We will need that 
kind of vision. 

When J.C. 
Penney was 95 
years old, he af- 
firmed, "My eye- 
sight may be get- 
ting weaker, but 
my vision is in- 
creasing." A 
friend of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes 
asked him why 

he had taken up the study of Greek at the age of 94. 
Holmes replied, "Well, my good sir, it's now or never." 

That's the way it is with the FGBC. It's now or 
never. We will either "forget what is behind and 
strain toward what is ahead" or we will slip into 
ecclesiastical oblivion. 

You may feel if s impossible. In our own strength 
it is, but in God's power these goals can be achieved. 
Remember, "winners stretch to the vision and winn- 
ers shrink from the vision." Will you be a winner or a 
whiner?! 

By Robert Fetterhoff 

Pastor Wooster Ohio 
Grace Brethren Church 

1993- 1994 Moderator of the 
Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches 




July/ August 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



BRETHREN MISSIONARY 




Volume 56 No. 7 






July /August 1994 



3 GUEST EDITORIAL 
Sight Or Vision? 

5 Did Buddy Die in Vain? 

6 CHURCH FOCUS 

United in Ministry - S.W. Columbus 

7 CE NATIONAL 
Ministry Ideas For You 

8 A Memory or a Memorial? 

9 Gays In the Military 

10 WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 
Freedom? For Women 

11 SPORTS 
Going Public 



13 Where Is Seminary Education Going? 
Part 1 



14 FELLOWSHIP NEWS 

15 Another Top Ten List 

16 Molten Iron and a Melted Heart 

1 7 Should a Doctor Ever End Your Life? 



18 FOREIGN MISSIONS 
Toward AD2000 



19 Honoring and Praying For Your Pastor 
22 HERALD NEWSLINE 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Dan McMaster 
Foreign Missions 
Tom Julien 
Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 
Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 
Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 
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DID BUDDY DIE IN VAIN? 

By Dan Gillette 



When Thomas J. Craghead, Sr. graduated from Grace Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1954, he answered the call to become the 
pastor of the Grace Brethren Church in Riner, Virginia. His only 
son, Thomas "Buddy" J. Craghead, Jr., answered the call to serve 
his country in Viet Nam by enlisting in the United States Navy 
in 1967. 

As the forward gunner on a river patrol boat, he was on 
a mission to rescue another patrol boat which had been crippled 
by enemy fire in the Mekong Delta. A sniper bullet found Buddy 
and he died in the presence of his crew and skipper, Petty Officer 
Ron Hines. The date was February 4, 1968. 

Why would God take the only son of a pastor who gave 
himself to the Lord's service? Why did there have to be war 
anyway? And what about Viet Nam? A purposeless, endless, 
unwinnable, useless war which released over 50, 000 Americans 
from this world to the next. These questions and more haunted 
Buddy's parents, his two sisters, and his church family, particu- 
larly at Christmas... family gatherings... his birthday. Did Buddy 
die in vain? 

Twenty-six years later, 
February 6, 1994, the Grace 
Brethren Church in 
Covington, Virginia, had this 
note in its bulletin: "The flow- 
ers in the sanctuary today are 
in memory of Buddy 
Craghead, given by his par- 
ents." The beautiful bouquet 
of patriotic colors had one 
lone American flag, a re- 
minder of one life no longer 
with us. 

It just so happened that 
the person standing behind 
those flowers that Sunday was 
a man who also served in Viet Nam, Jay Bell, a representative 
for Grace Brethren Foreign Missions. And it just so happened 
that his recent trip to Cambodia was on his mind and in his 
message. 

As Jay Bell shared his moving stories, he reminded us that 
we went to Southeast Asia with bullets in the 60' s and 70' s. But 
now in the 90' s, as these countries have opened up to the West, 
we have opportunity to return with Bibles. He shared their 
openness to receive the Gospel, how hundreds are being saved, 
how churches are starting, and how we as Grace Brethren people 
can be part of this great harvest. 

Jay also shared a conversation with a Cambodian believer. 
Jay asked him how he deals with his faith in God and the horrors 
of the wars his people have seen for many years. Did he doubt 
God's power? Did he blame God? Was he bitter at God? The 
answer came as a surprise. 

The Cambodian believer said that god had to use these wars 
to punish his people for their sins, particularly idolatry. The 
people worshipped many gods and feared the spirit world. But 
now they no longer fear the gods. Why? Because their gods could 
not protect them from the disaster and death of war. Therefore, 
the people concluded that their gods are worthless. Now they 
no longer fear the idols and spirit world. So today they are actively 





looking for the way to the 
real God so that He can fill 
their empty souls. There- 
fore hundreds and hundreds 
are being saved as they find 
Jesus Christ, the only way 
to God. 

If this is true, then was 
the war in Southeast Asia 
purposeless? Did our coun- 
try get involved by mis- 
take? Did Buddy serve and die in vain? Or is it possible that 
God was accomplishing His plan through the United States and 
actually was preparing to save thousands of souls at a later time? 
The 1 990' s? As Jay Bell shared these thoughts and as the bouquet 
of red, white and blue flowers shared Buddy ' s part in God' s bigger 
plan, his mother let every word sink deeply into her troubled soul. 
Twenty-six years of questions found an answer. Twenty-six years 
of hurt found healing. Twenty-six years of bitterness found peace. 
God was in control all along. Because Buddy went there with 
bullets in the 60' s and 70' s, now missionaries are free to go there 
with Bibles in the 90' s. The one had to precede the other. Now 
the believers in Southeast Asia thank us for both. Who but God 
could create such an irony? 

On Sunday afternoon, May 26, 1991, in Houston, TX, 
Buddy's skipper retired Petty Officer Ron Hines unveiled a 
restored patrol boat, like the one on which Buddy died. The project 
cost $45,000.00 During the ceremony, Buddy's parents, Tommy 
and Edna Mae Craghead received a painting of a patrol boat with 
their son's picture superimposed on it in one corner, a bouquet 
of flowers and a duplicate plaque of the one attached to the boat. 




It read, "Dedicated to the Memory of Thomas James Craghead, 
Gunners Mate 2nd Class 535th River Section. Killed in Action 
4 Feb 68. Mekong Delta. Forever Remembered by His Brothers 
In Arms." 

Maybe someday in Heaven some Southeast Asian Christians 
will present Buddy with a plaque for being part of God's plan 
to free them from the fear and worship of idols, and to save them 
from their sins. It may read, "Forever Remembered by Your 
Brothers In Christ, Thank You." 

Dan Gillette graduated from Grace Seminary in 1984 with both 
the M. Div. and MABC degrees. He has pastored the Grace 
Brethren Church in Covington, Virginia since then. Tommy Sr. 
and Edna Mae Craghead are members. 



July/August 1994 



CHURCH FOCUS 



United In Ministry 



by Tony Webb, Pastor 
Southwest Columbus Grace Brethren Church 



There are few things in life more 
exciting than seeing what God 
does in and through His own 
people in the local church. It has been 
my privilege the past three years to see 
not only what God has done but what 
he is doing with His people here in 
Southwest Columbus. 

God crossed my family's path 
with the path of the Southwest Grace 




Pastor Tony Webb and son Philip 

Ground Breaking Service 

Pastor Webb reading I Corinthians 3 

Brethren Church in the Spring of 1 99 1 . 
After arriving here in the summer of 
199 1 , we have witnessed God do tre- 
mendous things. We have grown as a 
church family through the vision of 
our leadership and the desire of all our 
people to see a church family in ac- 
tion! 

Excitement in the ministry is what 
we all seek, pray for and work to- 
wards. When God delivers excitement, 
it is often too good to be true - but it is 
true! God has steadily grown our 
church family by the addition of new 
families on a regular basis from a 
committed group of 50 to a group 
hovering just over 1 00; we praise God 
for all of this! The new families God 
has led to be part of our church through 
a flier that was distributed in our com- 
munity or personal contact from an- 



other of our own families or even the 
providential appointment - God has 
used so many ways to unite us in our 
ministry effort (but always through 
prayer!). 

Because of the faithfulness of so 
many over the years, God has honored 
their work and commitment and made 
it possible for the rest of us to share in 
what God is now doing in Southwest 
Columbus. Our vision has been to see 
disciples made from those who either 
have not trusted in Christ or those who 
have no church home. There is an 
obvious need for a faithful, discipling 
ministry here in Southwest Franklin 
County. Please pray for us to be that 
link, that tool God can use to further 
His Kingdom through the gospel ! 

The desire for our own home has 
grown from the dreaming and plan- 
ning stages in the summer of 1992 to 
our ground breaking service which 
took place on February 27, 1994. It 
was a sunny, cool day - a great day for 
the church family to celebrate what 
lies ahead. Many people turned shov- 











jjMMii 


JJTvjB 


r.^MfWt-.l^il 






HI 


iUbki " • ** li 


- 



Church family at 
Ground Breaking Service 

els' full of dirt since they have 
worked hard for so long to see the 
establishment of our own home. This 
vision of our home is being realized 
through the ministry of Yokefellow 
International. The Yokefellows are 
giving of themselves to put our build- 
ing up and helping us achieve some- 



thing that would otherwise be out of 
our reach for a long time! 

Pray for us as the Yokefellows 
work hard and strive for a September 
completion date. Our own church fam- 
ily will, of course, be involved too - 
but so will many other Grace Brethren 
churches in our Fellowship, especially 
in the Columbus area. We praise God 
for the willing cooperation from all 




Candlelight Service 
December 24. 1993 

the other GBC's in our Fellowship. 

Pastor Ed Jackson was instru- 
mental in making our vision of a home 
come from a dream, to a state-ap- 
proved plan, to the work beginning 
March 1 ! We need your vital involve- 
ment with us to truly function as a 
Fellowship of churches - we need you 
to pray, we need you to find out more 
about Yokefellow International, we 
need all to live and love as brothers 
and sisters, in harmony, in our dear 
Lord! 

As God continues to bring to us 
individual families to be loved and 
discipled, so too we need to hold each 
other up in a like mind to God' s glory. 

If you would like more informa- 
tion about Yokefellow International, 
please contact Pastor Ed Jackson c/o 
Grace Brethren Men International, 
6675 Worthington-Galena Rd., 
Worthington, Ohio 43085. 



c HEl^LD 



CE NATIONAL 



Idea Corner for Children's Workers 

from Diane McLean, Director of Children 's Ministries at Worthington, Ohio GBC 

Prayer 

Have people in your congregation sign up to be prayer 
warriors for your children's ministries and staff. Send periodic 
newsletters, including requests and answers to prayer, to each 
person who signs up. Encourage your prayer warriors that 
everything that happens successfully, happens because of 
prayer! 




Honoring Workers 

Honor your workers! Last year the Worthington GBC had a 
sit-down brunch on a Saturday morning. It was short and simple 
and provided a time to eat, fellowship, and be honored. A small 
gift of appreciation was given to each worker. 

This year the church honored children's workers in the 
Sunday morning service. Each one stood and received a bouton- 
niere or corsage. There was also an "open house" breakfast that 
Sunday morning. 

Be sure to send a special invitation to the workers you are 
honoring. Each year, vary the way you honor your children's 
workers. It keeps it special if they know they will be honored, but 
are surprised with how it will be done. 

Children's Training 

Because it is sometimes difficult to get teachers to attend 
ongoing training meetings, supplement your training with peri- 
odic training newsletters. Include ideas such as: how to lead a 
young child to Christ, discipline ideas, children and prayer, the 
teaching/learning process, and motivating students to learn. 
Keep the newsletter at one page so it is not too lengthy to read. 
If you do not have the time to write your own newsletter, Gospel 
Light has an excellent resource with reproducible pages, Sun- 
day School Smart Pages. 

Recruiting 

Recruiting idea: Have the Adult Bible Fellowship (ABF) 
leaders personally call attenders who they feel would be good 
with the children. Target the classes where most of the children's 
parents attend. 

A personal contact by someone familiar, such as the ABF 
leader, is the best way to recruit. If the class leader thinks they 
are capable of teaching Sunday school, it often gives the 
potential workers the confidence to try. 

Preschool Helpers 

Recruit older youth (16-18 years) to teach in the preschool 
classes. It is best to team them with an adult coach who has 
experience teaching. If this is not possible, have special training 
for the young people. One of the best preschool teachers can be 
videotaped actually teaching a class. The video can be shown to 
the youth at one of the first meetings. The ideas seen in the video 
and how they can be implemented in other classes can then be 
discussed. The young people also need to be given direction on 
how to communicate with the parents as they drop-off and pick- 
up their children. 

This is a great way to help youth develop their skills with 
children. The Worthington GBC has had young people choose 
to major in teaching/education in college because their experi- 
ence with teaching Sunday school has given them a real interest 
in and heart for children. 



Sunday School 

Information and Ideas From 

"Mr. Sunday School" 

1 . 66% of church growth is in the "young adults" age 
group (ages 18-36). What are we doing to encour- 
age this group (childcare, ABFs, good Bible teach- 
ing on people of faith)? 

2. In the past 30 years, people's leisure time has 
dropped from 28 hours a week to 18 hours a week. 
Rather than expecting too much time at church, we 
must combine church activities. 

3. The average faithful church attender will be gone 
11 Sundays per year (five for vacation, two for 
business, two for family, and two for sickness). Our 
concept of "faithfulness" needs to align with how 
much time people will be able to give. 

4. Did you know that some churches have Sunday 
school on Sunday evenings? A Nazarene church 
near Columbus, Ohio has a Sunday evening "group 
opening" for vision-casting (announcements with a 
purpose), music and "specials," and small classes. 
They call it "the church at study" on Sunday eve- 
nings and have "the church at worship" on Sunday 
morning. 

5. Make ABF class enrollment simple. Always call on 
someone who misses a week. Today's society likes 
to feel appreciated and missed (but not nagged). 

6. The modern ABF is led by a three-person team, 
not just one teacher. The team consists of a teacher, 
a class leader, and a care leader. 

7. Five ways to make ABFs more friendly are: (a) 
handshakes, (b) coffee, (c) name tags, (d) a ques- 
tion and answer format, and (e) cookie visits to 
follow-up on visitors. 

8. Small cell groups as a "substitute" for ABF's 
usually don't last for more than two years. Even 
though you have cell groups, keep your ABF's 
strong. 

9. Give choices to your ABF's on: (a) the time the 
class meets, (b) topics, and (c) systems of delivery 
(lecture or discussion). 

1 0. The three greatest needs in the traditional home 
are: (a) a good husband-wife relationship, (b) good 
parenting, and (c) good management of time and 
money (stewardship). 



This information was gleaned from Elmer Towns' 
"Will Your Sunday School Survive?" 



July/August 1994 




A MEMORY 
OK A MEMORIAL 



By Dr. Robert Divine 

Pastor, Middlebranch, Ohio Grace Brethren Church 



Edna was 75 years 
old when she died in a 
nursing home. No one was there to be with her when she 
passed away, she just died. She never talked much. No one 
knew whether she had a family. If she had a family, they did 
not come to visit her. No one could really say that they knew 
her, because she never talked much. She just kept to herself 
and was a recluse. She bore on her arm a tattoo, which must 
have been a horrifying experience for her. Edna was Jew- 
ish, and she was a victim and a survivor of the Holocaust 
prison camps. So, she kept to herself. Maybe it was that she 
did not trust anyone. It could be that she did not trust 
Christians. The Jewish people still believe that the Chris- 
tians failed them and could have stopped the Holocaust 
long before they did. She was with strangers. She never 
shared her heart with anyone, and so they ignored her. 
When Edna died, no one really seemed to care. She was 
taken to a funeral home, where she was buried properly as 
they all are. 

Back at the nursing home, there were two trash bags on 
Edna's bed. In these bags summed up her whole life. A few 
odds and ends that she was able to hang on to while she was 
in the nursing home. And they just put them in a trash bag, 
waiting for someone to come and claim them. It would not 
be the unusual in a situation like that for those trash bags full 
of someone's worldly possessions to sit there for two weeks 
before anyone claimed them. No one really wanted what 
she had. It was not worth much. Just enough to survive here 
on earth. A few clothes, maybe a memento or two, possibly 
a picture that was meaningful to her. No one really knew 
what she wanted done with the things, so they just sat there. 
Eventually, the trash bags disappeared. 

This makes one wonder what life is really going to be 
like when we face the very end of it. Will our life be 
summed up in a memory? Edna's memory is rather short. 
Very incomplete. I asked about Edna the other day, saying, 
"What ever happened to Edna's remains?" And they an- 
swered, "Who?" I explained to them, "You know, the lady 
with the tattoo on her arm from the prison camp." "Oh, yes, 
that's right. I guess her family took her. She had relatives 
that lived far away. We don't really know." 

Edna was not really even much of a memory. She 
passed from this earth's scene, and no one seemed to really 
care. The earth is no poorer, now that she is gone. And 
heaven. . . I wonder if Edna really knew anything about our 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

Yet there are others that have passed from this earth's 
scene on into glory, and they leave a memorial behind of a 
life that was spent honoring our Lord and in gladness with 
their family, with lots of joy and happiness. A spouse will 
miss them greatly, because they spend many hours sharing 



life's joys and sorrows together-growing together. Their 
children will miss their parent, their mom or their dad, and 
they will leave a memorial behind; possibly a child named 
after them. Possibly some family mementos will be left 
behind, like the old family Bible that meant so much to 
them, a memorial that speaks of a life that was lived for the 
Lord. 

There is a little couplet that says, "Only one life 'twill 
soon be passed; only what' s done for Christ will last." That 
is a pretty important thought, when you think of it. What 
lives on in eternity is what is done for Christ! All the things 
that we strive for here on earth will perish and pass away. 
Everything on this earth will pass away. That nice new 
home, that great big home that we have finally worked for 
and paid off. I remember so well how my father-in-law 
worked hard and long to pay for a house, and the last two 
payments were paid for him by a power of attorney. He was 
in the hospital dying of cancer. He never got to enjoy even 
one month of a rent-free, paid-up house. When he died the 
house was sold, and the estate was divided according to his 
wishes. It soon passed. All that was inherited, which was 
not much, is long gone by now. 

One can strive to build a business. He devotes his total 
life to it. By the time it passes to the grandson of the owner, 
there is not much left of the business. They, too often, 
become the playboy; the one who inherited all this money. 
They did not work for it, so they do not really appreciate it. 
Statistics tell us that the average inheritance is spent within 
the first year. So, it soon will pass. There is not much of a 
memorial left behind. I have noticed that some streets have 
been named for a famous person; when they die, these 
streets are renamed for someone who is more famous. One 
could have a building named after himself, and eventually 
the wrecking crew will demolish it. It might last thirty or 
forty years; it is rare if it will last one hundred years. Then 
the memory is gone, but the memorial of one's building 
their life into someone else's life, pouring out one's soul in 
service to the Lord, that extended energy will last for 
eternity. Scripture calls it laying up treasures in heaven, 
where moth and rust cannot corrupt and thieves cannot 
steal. It will last forever. 

As you strive today to prepare for your retirement, for 
your future life, have you included eternity? Have you 
decided to make your life a mere memory, or to make it a 
memorial? One that will speak volumes to those that follow 
after you of your love, your devotion, and your service to 
the loving Saviour. You can leave an example for others to 
follow. You can leave an inheritance far richer than mere 
money. 

A MEMORY OR A MEMORIAL? Which will it 
be? 



c HEf^W 



Gays in the 

ILITARY 



An indicator of change emerged when President Clinton 
announced his intent to lift the ban on gays in the military. The 
resulting public response was immediate and furious. 

While the average number of calls to the Congressional 
phone system averaged 86,000 between January and February 
1992, following the President's announcement, the number of 
daily calls climbed to a peak of 5 1 3,325 calls and remained high 
for weeks! 

Congress acted to schedule hearings on this issue, and we 
were contacted by individual leaders within the military who 
asked us to research whether the Founding Fathers held any views 
on homosexuals in the military, and if so, what those views were. 
Frankly, we doubted whether this would have been addressed two 
hundred years ago, but we nonetheless agreed-and were very 
much surprised by what we found. 

HISTORY SPEAKS TO THIS ISSUE 

To our amazement, not only did the Founding Fathers have 
very clear views on gays in the military, but the original expulsion 
of homosexuals from the military had been instituted by George 
Washington! His order book for March 14, 1778, reported: 
At a General Court Martial whereof Col. Tupper was Presi- 
dent (10th March 1778) Lieutt. Enslin of Col. Malcom's 
Regiment [was] tried for attempting to commit sodomy, with 
John Monhort a soldier; Secondly, for Perjury in swearing to 
false Accounts, [he was] found guilty of the charges exhib- 
ited against him, being breaches of 5th. Article 1 8th. Section 
of the Articles of War and [we] do sentence him to be 
dismiss'd [from] the service with Infamy. His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief [George Washington] approves the 
sentence and with Abhorrence and Detestation of such 
Infamous Crimes orders Lieutt. Enslin to be drummed out of 
Camp tomorrow morning by all the Drummers and Fifers in 
the Army never to return; The Drummers and Fifers [are] to 
attend on the Grand Parade at Guard mounting for that 
Purpose. 

Views on this behavior were also recorded by other Found- 
ing Fathers, including John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James 
Wilson. 

We prepared the report and delivered it to selected military 
leaders, Congressional leaders, and conservative media members. 
In the hearings, much had been made of the "fact" that the 
controversy over gays in the military was a relatively new phe- 
nomenon and therefore a policy must be determined to address 
this modern issue, for the original Commander-in-Chief had dealt 
with it over 200 years ago! The tone of the debate was clearly 
altered by this information (see, for example, Rep. Duncan 
Hunter's remarks in the Congressional record for September 28, 
1993, covered also by C-SPAN). 

A SUCCESSFUL OUTCOME 

Eventually, both the House and the Senate passed identical 
regulations retraining the ban on gays in the military. Congress 
made its position very clear: 



"The prohibition against homosexual conduct is a long- 
standing element of military law that continues to be necessary. . . . 
The presence in the armed forces of persons who demonstrate a 
propensity or intent to engage in homosexual acts would create an 
unacceptable risk to the high standards of morale, good order and 
discipline, and unit cohesion that are the essence of military 
capability." 

The policy enacted by Congress was succinct: 

"A member of the armed forces shall be separated from the 
armed forces . . . if . . . ( 1 ) The member has engaged in, attempted to 
engage in, or solicited another to engage in a homosexual act.... 
(2) The member has stated that he or she is a homosexual or 
bisexual. . . .(3) The member has married or attempted to marry a 
person known to be of the same biological sex." 

Congress explained that the power to establish such a policy 
was indisputably granted to it by the Constitution: "Section 8 of 
Article I of the Constitution of the United States commits exclu- 
sively to the Congress the powers to raise and support armies, 
provide and maintain a Navy, and make rules for the government 
and regulation of the land and naval forces." 

By prohibiting gays in the military, Congress was simply 
making "rules for the government and regulation of the land and 
naval forces." 

THWARTED BY THE COURTS - ALMOST 

Despite the authority granted the Congress by the Constitu- 
tion, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia 
(composed of twelve federal judges) gutted the Congressional 
regulations. (Each Court of Appeals is composed of between six 
and twenty-eight judges; typically only three of them are ran- 
domly picked to hear a case.) Following the ruling, the Clinton 
administration's Justice Department refused to pursue an appeal 
to reinstate the heart of the ban. 

Congressional leaders from both sides of the aisle - particu- 
larly Senators Nunn, Thurmond, and Coates - threatened more 
hearing and additional restrictions on homosexuals in the military 
if the Justice Department and the Clinton administration did not 
aggressively seek to overturn the court ruling. 

However, in an unexpected development - and a potential 
major victory for those who support the ban - the remainder of the 
D.C. Court of Appeals voted to overrule the three judges and to 
rehear the case en banc (that is, rehear it before all the members 
of the court). 

The three judges who originally heard the case and ruled 
against the ban were appointed during the Carter administration 
and are considered to be liberals; the remaining nine judges who 
ordered the rehearing were appointed by the Reagan and Bush 
administrations and are considered to be conservatives. 

These are only two of the many positive developments 
occurring across the nation, and these victories are being accom- 
plished not by a handful or rabid antihomosexual activists, but by 
the public at large. This is very heartening, for historically the 
attitude of people toward homosexuality has served as a guage and 
early indicator of national moral improvement. Quite frankly, 
homosexuals are no longer gaining unopposed political ground. 



Reprinted by permission 
The Wallbuilder Report 



July/August 1994 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



FREEDOM? FOR WOMEN 

The Modern Feminist Movement advocates freedom from male domination, freedom from traditional family roles and 
freedom to pursue personal goals with little sense of responsibility to others. They champion freedom to bear a child or to 
end its life before birth. They want nothing to do with a Holy God and His standards, and some even proclaim allegiance to 
a female deity-Sophia, or the Queen of Heaven. They strive not only for freedom, but power! (See Megatrends for Women 
by Patricia Aburdene and John Naisbitt, Villard Books of Random House, Inc., NY, 1992) 

The outcome of this attitude is marriages destitute of commitment, children without moral standards to guide them, and 
often, bitter, disillusioned women. 



What is Freedom, Anyway? 

Here are some comments from women who are experienc- 
ing genuine freedom in Christ-women who have faced 
inferiority, disappointment, danger, sickness, fear, death of 
a husband, loneliness... 



The second child and just another girl. Inferior. A young 
girl without any outstanding qualities. Just run-of-the-mill 
stuff. A young woman who faced the awful reality that not all 
men (perhaps only a few) approved of women in Christian 
work. Then 1 heard the verse: "Let every man (person) wherein 
he is called, therein abide with God (I Cor. 7:24 KJV). No 
matter the condition, one can abide with God. I am happy to 
be a woman, for as a woman, I can abide with God.-Ruth 
Snyder 

Ah, the freedom of knowing that an Almighty, all-know- 
ing, and all-loving God is taking care of me. When things seem 
to be falling apart I don't have to make life work! I can relax 
and let God work out the details of my life, and the lives of 
others (cf I Peter 5:7).-Peggy Owens. 

There were times whenldidn 'tknow what to do, but when 
I trusted God and went each day in the path before me I was 
blessed with joy and freedom (cf. Proverbs 3:5, 6). Then as I 
looked back I saw that God was guiding me and preparing me 
for the future-Ruth Kent 

Knowing that God created me as a woman gives me 
complete freedom to enjoy Him and to enjoy being a woman. 
I have a place in His family; I have a purpose in His plan; I have 
a role in relating to others. I can be content, joyful and fulfilled 
right where He has put me. -Miriam Pacheco 

When the curtain in the temple was completely torn in 
two, 1 became completely free to come before Him (cf. Mat- 
thew 27:51 and Hebrews 10:19-22) Whatfreedom.'-Marietta 
Sell 

When we confess our sins and failures we can accept 
God's forgiveness and forgiveness from other people, and we 
can enjoy the subsequent freedom (cf. I John 1:9). Then 
realizing that God takes our weaknesses and makes them 
strengths (cf. U Corinthians 12:9), and takes our messes and 



makes them something beautiful (cf. Isaiah 6 1 :3), we have real 
freedom and hope-Peggy Owens 

It was a dark night in Romania. I was in a car driven by 
a guy flagged down on the streets by a Romanian woman I did 
not know and with whom I could not communicate. Satan 
began planting thoughts in my head: "He is going to take you 
somewhere and rape you or kill you. " I was terrified. But I 
began to pray. I thought, God knows what is best for me and 
if He chooses for me to die, then let it be. Immediately I had a 
peace beyond all understanding and I arrived safely at my 
destination.-] ulia Miller 

Hearing the doctor say. "Yes, it's malignant," stirs up 
many emotions, but fear of dying doesn't have to be one of 
them. July, 1983, was that experience for me. God gave such 
peace and confidence that He was in control and makes no 
mistakes. If cancer would have caused my death I would have 
been in His presence-Miriam Pacheco 

At the mercy seat I receive mercy and grace to help in time 
of need (cf. Hebrews 4:16). He understands my hurts, my 
despair, or whatever my needs or problems. He doesn 't scold 
me for coming to Him. Through the insights He gives, my 
problems come into perspective, my attitudes are changed or 
tempered, and I have a greater sense of strength and confi- 
dence. What is too much for me to deal with God often cares 
for without my intervention.-Mary Clouse 

God has taught me recently that I have a very limited 
perspective of the future. When I make decisions based on my 
understanding I can make wrong choices. However, by taking 
my concerns about the future to Him He opens doors for me 
that I would never have imagined. -Julia Miller 

/ don 't have total freedom from loneliness, but when I 
grieve He comforts me and reminds me that He will never leave 
me nor forsake me. " I realize too that everyone is lonely at 
times. That awareness helps me reach out to others, which in 
turn gives meaning and freedom to me. I live in the knowledge 
that 1 am part of the bride of Christ and some day, in His 
continual presence, I won 't ever feel lonely again. That 
thought comforts me.-Peggy Owens 



10 



C HEF^LD 



SPORTS 



fim Gallagher Jr., 33-year- 
old professional golfer, 
Ryder Cup hero for the 
victorious Americans, 
andNo.4manonthel993 
money list, is lying in bed one night at 
home in Greenwood, Mississippi. He's 
sounding a bit like Elvis Presley, the 
legend who was born up the road in 
Tupelo. 

Gallagher is all shook up. 
Struggling with his own inadequa- 
cies, Gallagher is wondering whether he 
should consent to his first interview about 



for him to place his hands on them and pray for 
them. But the disciples rebuked those who 
brought them. Jesus said, "Let the little chil- 
dren come to me, and do not hinder them, for 
the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as 
these" (Matthew 19:13-14). 

Gallagher is "such as these." He's 
childlike in his faith, and he wants to pass 
that faith on to his children-Mary Langdon, 
2, and Thomas, 5 months. He prays with 
his daughter before bedtime and freely 
offers the substance of those prayers m an 
interview. Stuff like "Thanks, God, for just 
a good day," and "Thank you for today." 



By Allen Palmeri 



GOING 
PUBLIC 

A family death and a loving wife helped Jim Gallagher Jr. find 
direction in life, but until now it's been tough to talk about it 



his newfound faith in Jesus Christ. His 
pastor, Jim Phillips, has already told him 
that he can decline. 

A protective friend from Jackson is 
concerned that the writer would promote 
Gallagher ahead of other, stronger men, 
and the writer himself has some reserva- 
tions. Gallagher considers his self described 
"terrible temper" and tells his wife that 
perhaps he should not do it, chiefly be- 
cause he does not consider himself to be a 
role model. But Cissye Gallagher knows 
the time is right. She counters her 
husband's doubts with absolute confi- 
dence. 

"He still feels a lot of guilt," Cissye 
says, explaining her husband's lack of spiri- 
tual confidence. "I said, 'If s not about 
being worthy. If you've got an opportu- 
nity to reach one reader, if s more than 
worth it.'" 

So Cissye wins the battle, and a seem- 
ingly nervous Gallagher begins the inter- 
view the next morning in a chatty mood. 
He speaks about reading Matthew, Mark, 
Luke, and John, although he admits he 
cannot quote even one verse. Not yet. 

He speaks of Jesus with the simple 
sentence, "He's given me direction." And 
he teaches an awestrick writer profound 
truths. 

Iter; little children were brought to Jesus 



Says grown-up Jim: "If s just a little prayer 
for a 2-year -old, but if s also a prayer for 
me. If s probably the best way for me too." 

Gallagher thinks back to his child- 
hood, a simpler time in Indiana when life 
wasn't quite as dangerous. Society hadn't 
crumbled as much in the late 1960s and 
early 1970s. Children were still relatively 
innocent. You can almost hear the sadness 
in Gallagher's reminiscing about the days 
before MTV, Ice-T, and AIDS. 

"If s so hard today," he says. "It is 
tougher growing up now than when I was 
a kid, because society's changed its whole 
outlook You can take guns to school, but 
you can't say a prayer? Thaf s crazy to 
me." 

In a materialistic system, where golf 
professionals generally choose to live in 
exotic states such as Florida, California, or 
Arizona, Gallagher draws stares when he 
says he lives in Greenwood. 

This simple choice speaks volumes. 
Gallagher wants to raise his children in 
Mississippi, where people generally fear 
God and promote things such as prayer in 
school. He supports Governor Kirk 
Fordice, one of the most outspoken Chris- 
tian leaders in America, by saying, "Thaf s 
what we need to get back to." He also 
supported a Jackson principal who allowed 
prayer in school when students protested 



for that right, toughing off a national con- 
troversy last year. 

"I can raise my kids with a good 
moral background," Gallagher says, pick- 
ing up speed like a preacher. "If s a nice 
community. It's just good old America. I 
can go down to the not-so-rich part of 
town and don't have to fear. During the 
day, you can go anywhere you want." 

If Gallagher ever strays from his 
faith, he need not look very far for a re- 
minder. His house in town sits directly 
across the street from the church he at- 
tends. When Gallagher's out working in 
his yard, he often sees Pastor Jim Phillips. 
"I've gotno excuses," Gallagher comments, 
"I've got about 30 feet to go." 

Theeun uch asked Philip, " 'Tell me, please, 
who is the prophet talking about, himself or 
someone else?" Then Philip began with that 
very passage of Scripture and told him the good 
news about Jesus (Acts 8:34-35). 

If you change Philip to Phillips, you 
hold the key to the change in Jim 
Gallagher's life. Ever since December 1 990, 
when Phillips moved to Greenwood from 
Tupelo, the golfer has been on the pastor's 
heart. All he had to do was wait for the 
nght time. 

It was Jim Phillips who helped 
Gallagher cope with the death of his 
mother-in-law, Linda Meeks, to ovarian 
cancer in 1991. Gallagher could only mar- 
vel at how Christian faith sustained both 
his wife and her mom, as well as his father- 
in-law Ed Meeks. A lengthy 10-year battle 
like Linda's was unheard of, and Gallagher 
could hardly stand to watch her die. After 
Linda was gone, the Gallaghers moved 
into her house, the one across the street 
from the church. Daughter Mary Langdon 
was born in 1 992. "One li fe was taken, and 
one was given," Gallagher says. 

Gallagher started thinking more and 
more about the kind of father he wanted to 
be. Phillips gave him books about Chris- 
tian fatherhood, and Cissye would tell the 
pastor that Jim had read every page. Feel- 
ing a greater burden to help, Phillips gave 
Gallagher a Bible. He also said he would 
like to talk man-to-man about spiritual 
matters, and Gallagher agreed to do it. 
Sometime. 

Gallagher kept thinking back to those 
6-to-8 hour conversations he used to have 
in the car with Cissye, when he would 
marvel at her faith. He chastised himself 
for blowing up at the US Open and 
thought about what he had been missing. 
The time had arrived. 

"I didn't have any direction," 
Gallagher recalls. "I was just playing golf 



July/ August 1994 



11 



and trying to do the best I could. I drew 
my strength from golf, and that wasn't 
good. I came home and said, 'Cissye, I'm 
ready to talk to Jim.'" 

it was June 14, a Monday night. 
Phillips crossed the street, and Gallagher 
crossed over from death mto life by ac- 
cepting Jesus Christ as his Savior. "It was 
really a great feeling," the golfer says. "It 
was like the whole world was taken off my 
shoulders. If I was going to raise my kids 
in a proper way, I wanted to know which 
direction to take them in." On October 10, 
Phillips baptized Gallagher at the church. 
The golfer was a new creation in Christ. "I 
really believe he wants to be a godly father 
and husband," Phillips says. 

On the night he placed his faith in 
Jesus Christ, Gallagher started to walk 
with Him in a childlike way. Also, Phillips 
told him to call somebody and tell him 
about his salvation. Gallagher called his 
caddy, Al Hansen. "He was so pumped 
up," Gallagher recalls. "He was in Las 
Vegas, and wanted to hug me from there. 
It made me feel good about myself.: 

Two weeks later, Gallagher really felt 
good about himself. He won a major tour- 
nament. 

Cissye was concerned that the imme- 
diate blessing would give him the wrong 
idea about the Christian walk. "That 
messed me up a little," she says. "That 
even shocked me. More than anything, it 
made Jim relax. 

"I'dbeen praying for Jim to play well, 
to start playing better. It was kind of like to 
show him that until you set golf aside and 
it becomes second or third , nothing's go- 
ing to happen anyway. Until he could play 
it as a job, and not his life, it wouldn't be 
right. His self-worth is not dependent on 
his shooting a 65." 

The lesson of the quick victory after 
his conversion was not lost on Gallagher. 
During the tournament, he told chaplain 
Larry Moody that he had become a Chris- 
tian. Then he prayed some Mary Langdon- 
like prayers before his rounds, asking God 
for the strength to do his best. 

"I said, "This can't be that easy,'" 
Gallagher recalls. "I was so calm out there, 
I never got nervous." And it wasn't even 
the best momentin what would turnoutto 
be the best year of his 10-year professional 
career. 

Gallagher was playing in his first 
Ryder Cup, at Sutton Coldfield, England- 
a little-known rookie playing against 
Europe's finest. Golf World Magazine had 
said, more or less, that he was America's 



weakest link, a man with little heart and 
soul who was destined to fail. "That hurt 
me bad. I said, 'Thaf s not fair.' Thaf s just 
a problem with how our society has 
changed . They want to see the bad instead 
of focusing on the good." 

The old Gallagher might have blown 
up, lost his temper, and succumbed to 
worry . The new Gallagher knew to rely on 
his faith. He read his Bible every night. 
How much did it help? "It was huge," he 
says. "It was unbelievable. Every night I 
prayed, 'Let me do my best. Help me to be 
calm and focused in my whole life." 




BRIAN SPURLOCK 



Gallagher played with a lot of heart 
and soul. After a close loss on the first day 
with partner Lee Janzen, he defeated En- 
glishman Mark James and his Italian part- 
ner Constantino Rocca, 5 and 4, with the 
help of his partner, fellow Christian Corey 
Pavin. Then came the final day. 

He was scheduled to play Sam Tor- 
rance, but he wanted to play Steve 
Ballesteros. In the middle of the church 
service he attended before tee-off time, he 
learned that Torrance had been scratched. 
He got what he wanted-the veteran with 
the 19-9-5 record in Ryder Cup to play. 
Gallagher started his game with a simple 
prayer to "get me through this one." 

"Just before I teed off, 1 told Tom 
Watson and Lanny Wdkins, 'He's going 
down today.' I wasn't bragging or any- 
thing, but I honestly felt I could beat him. 
I felt he was going to underestimate me, 
and I had a lot to prove. I drew some 
strength out there that wasn't mine." 
Strength enough for a 3 and 2 victory, 
perhaps the most stunning point that day 
in what turned out to be a 15-13 U.S. win. 

Later in the year, a victory at the PGA 
Tour Championship boosted him to the 



No. 4 spot on the final money list, capping 
his greatest season ever. It pushed him up 
to 40th on the career cast list and set the 
stage for a solid 1994. 

Gallagher says he would like to climb 
to the level of a Paul Azinger, where he 
would be known as a champion of a maj or 
tournament and a consistent Top 10 win- 
ner. Contrary to what the golf magazine 
said, he appears to have heart and soul. 
And when writers refer to him as an up- 
and-coming player, he deals with it by 
reminding himself of his roots. 

"Success changes people," says the 
man who likes to dig in his yard 
and hunt ducks. "Money changes 
people. Idon'thavealotofwants. 
The only one I have is to make 
sure my kids have anything they 
need. I can quit playing today and 
be totally happy with everything 
I have. I've accomplished more in 
my life than I've ever dreamed of 
accomplishing, but I'm not done 
dreaming." 

The mam difference now is 
that those dreams include the per- 
son of Jesus Christ, the Savior 
who came alive within Gallagher 
for the first time on that June day 
in Mississippi. He freely admits 
that he was stuck in religion, try- 
ing to live a good life on his own 
power and failing miserably. Now he 
dreams of a consistent walk of faith like 
fellow pros Azinger, Pavin, and Scott 
Simpson-men he strives to emulate. His 
favorite Christian golfer is Larry Mize, 
1987 Masters champion and 1994 third- 
place finisher, whom Gallagher calls "the 
total package." Mize, says Gallagher, 
"loves his family. He puts his faith and his 
family first." Gallagher also admires Bruce 
Lietzke because "his family's first and his 
golf is about seventh." 

Cissye, who gave up a promising 
LPGA career to take care of her children 
and support her husband, sees a differ- 
ence in Jim that she believes will continue 
to grow. Before his life-changing meeting 
with the pastor last summer, she saw him 
as a person with an immature faith, and it 
scared her. His conversion, Cissye says, 
has "made a very big difference, mostly in 
his temperment and his level of compas- 
sion for everyone." 

And part of doing that is to go public, 
which didn't turn out to be so bad after all. 



Reprinted by permission 
SPORTS SPECTRUM MAGAZINE 



12 



C HE^\LD 



EDUCATION 



Where Is Seminary 
Education Going? 

Part 1 of 2 Parts 

by Dr. David R. Plaster 

Vice president for Academic Affairs 

Grace College and Theological Seminary 



One new and growing group of professionals 
today call themselves "futurists." They focus 
on reading the social, economic, political and 
cultural trends in our society. The press often 
calls upon them to provide insight into the future. Busi- 
nesses make major management and investment decisions 
based on their predictions. The futurist has become a very 
influential person because we are living in a time of rapid 
change. The instability and uncertainty produced by fast- 
paced change fuels a deep desire to know and understand 
the forces at work. 

Most of us in our own small way try to watch trends 
around us and make the necessary adjustments in our lives 
to cope with the changing contemporary situation in which 
we find ourselves. The same is true of seminaries across the 
United States. The dynamic and fast-moving changes in 
society as a whole and the church specifically have had a 
dramatic impact on the future of seminary education. That 
means that, whether we like it or not, seminary education is 
changing and will continue to change at a rapid pace in the 
near future. While some of us who are seminary graduates 
cherish the education we received, we must realistically 
face the facts and seek new, more effective ways to deliver 
the same theological content in a different environment. 

What is the current environment in which Grace Theo- 
logical Seminary finds itself? I see five major trends facing 
seminaries like Grace that require a response if we are 
going not only to survive but be effective in the near future. 
These realities are not unique to Grace. They are the trends 
impacting to one degree or another all evangelical seminar- 
ies today. 

First, there has been a marked decrease in the 
number of traditional students planning to go to semi- 
nary. There are several reasons why fewer students seek 
seminary training right after completing their college. To 
begin with, the decline in the number of students has now 
passed through the elementary and secondary schools. In 
1994 the prediction is that high schools will graduate the 
smallest number of students in years. That means that fewer 
students are available to go on to college and then to 
seminary. The most dramatic decline in numbers involves 



the type of families that make up the 
vast majority of our churches. Of 
those students who do push on to 
college, there are fewer young people 
presenting themselves for vocational 
Christian service. The current gen- 
eration of students, encouraged by 
their parents, are more interested in 
going to college to get a job that will 
guarantee a level of income they need 
to keep up their lifestyle. The minis- 
try is not held in the high regard it 
enjoyed in the past and certainly is 
not the vocation for those worried about salaries. Some of 
those who might be interested are discouraged by the huge 
college debts they face upon graduation. The average 
student in private four-year colleges graduates with a 
student loan indebtedness of between $ 1 6,000 and $20,000. 
The thought of three more years of tuition costs and 
possibly even more debt discourages many. By the time 
that we reach the end of this funnel, the number of tradi- 
tional students available for seminary has been dramati- 
cally reduced. With seminaries being more and more de- 
pendent upon tuition, the future looks bleak if this were the 
only source of students. 

Second, there is an increase in the number of "sec- 
ond-career" students wanting to get a seminary educa- 
tion. There is an ever-increasing number of people who 
established their families and their careers but now feel the 
call of God on their life for vocational Christian service. 
That is good news! However, these students don't fit into 
the standard seminary program very well. With growing 
families, established jobs, active ministries in their local 
churches, and homes they are buying, it isn't easy to uproot 
and spend three years as a full-time student in Winona 
Lake. Time and tuition costs are equally difficult obstacles. 
Second-career students are also adult learners. Educators 
have discovered that adult education has to be approached 
in a very different fashion than with the traditional 18-21 
year-old college student. Teaching styles have to be more 
interactive. Adult learners need to have more individual 
responsibility and ownership of the learning process. 

Third, issues beyond those of academic prepara- 
tion must be faced. In the post-Christian America, the 
effects of humanistic secularism has eroded its way into the 
church and Christian homes. Matters once taken forgranted 
have been ignored far too long. Seminaries now must work 
at the spiritual formation, the Christian character of those 
preparing for ministry. In addition, the increasingly com- 
plex skills demanded of pastors means that more time must 
be spent in training with practical ministry skills. The best 
place for those skills to develop is not in the classroom. 
More training must be moved out of the seminary class- 
room and into the local church. 



July/August 1994 



13 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



Fourth, there is an increased demand for leader- 
ship education within the local church for those not 
going into vocational ministry. The same complexity that 
demands more skills of the pastor also presses on the other 
leaders of the local church. More and more of them are 
asking for some type of biblical, theological education to 
better equip them for the work they do as lay leaders. Lay 
Bible institutes, discipleship groups, and pastoral mentors 
are springing up across the country in response to the 
demand. Here is a place where what the seminary has to 
offer, needs to be made available to local church leaders. 

Fifth, the need for some form of continuing educa- 
tion for pastors increases. The demands on pastors have 
changed just in the twenty years I have been involved in the 
ministry. Pastors increasingly feel the need to increase their 
skills and retool to face the changing world in which they 
minister. The seminary needs to respond to this vital need 
for the future. 

What steps are the faculty, administration and board taking 
to cope with the new situation? What is the vision that 
drives the present and future directions of our school? We 
will cover Part 2 in our next issue of the Herald. 



Daily Devotions 

It is not too late!!! If you do not have 
your copy of Daily Devotions for July - 
December you may order yours now. 
Quantity price is $2.50 each plus postage 
and handling. This book contains a devo- 
tional message for each day by a Grace 
Brethren wrtier. A Scripture reference is 
given for each devotional as well as pic- 
tures of staff personnel of the Grace Col- 
lege, Foreign Missions, Home Missions, 
CE National, WMC, Brethren Evangelistic 
Ministries and the Brethren Missionary 
Herald. These pictures serve as reminders 
to pray for those who are serving in these 
areas. 



Zuelch*, Richard T. (L) (Gloria) 

2309 Steamlee Ave. 

Long Beach, C A 90815 

(Tel. 310/597-7437) 

Grace Brethren Church of Cypress 



ADDRESS CHANGES 

Change your annual 

New Hope Community Church 

24610 Railroad Canyon Drive, Suite 10 

Canyon Lake, CA 92587 



Ed and Debbie Waken 
13011 N. 75th Lane 
Peoria, AZ 85381 

Home 602/412-9552 

Church 602/412-9556 

FAX 602/412-9553 



DEATH NOTICES 

Ronald D. Grubbs, 75, was called home to heaven on May 5, 
1994. He was bom in Dayton, Ohio, and for many years was a 
faithful member and leader in the First Brethren Church there. In 
1 976 he was a charter member of the Centerville Grace Brethren 
Church, serving as treasurer and member of the Church Council. 
He is survived by his wife, Elsie; a son, Dean; and a daughter, 
Pamela. Pastors G. Forrest Jackson and Greg A. Ryerson offici- 
ated at the memorial service. 

Rev. Simon Toroian, 70, went home to be with the Lord on May 
22. He pastored Grace Brethren Churches in Lake Odessa, Michi- 
gan; Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Singer Hill, Pennsylvania and Altoona, 
Pennsylvania (Juniata). He had retired from the pastorate and was 
active in Child Evangelism Fellowship in the county in which he 
lived. He was a member of the Leamersville Grace Brethren 
Church, Duncansville, Pennsylvania. John E. Gregory, pastor. 

FELLOWSHIP NEWS 

Sebring, Florida is a small, quiet city which is an ideal place for 
Brethren to serve the Lord while waiting for His return. On April 
1 5, Jesse Deloe arrived there with his briefcase full of legal papers. 
One of the documents was a promissory note for $ 1 00,000 marked 
"Paid in Full." 

After ten years it was time to rejoice. A dinner was served in 
honor of the church pioneers on Friday evening with Rev. Jesse 
Deloe as speaker. On Saturday morning a continental breakfast 



was enjoyed while viewing slides and photos of the early days of 

the church and reminiscing by Lester Pifer. In the early evening 

1 75 people enjoyed an indoor cook-out. Skits, mime and a concert 

by the puppets were enjoyed. Ralph Wiley, our interim pastor 

during 1991 -92 was the featured speaker. In his honor one of the 

puppets was named Ralph Y. Lee. 

Steve Figley , the first pastor of Sebring Grace Brethren Church, 

brought a message on Sunday morning that touched hearts as he 

recalled his early ministry. At the close of the service Pastor Glenn 

Rininger explained that many had contributed to the repaying of 

the B.I.F. loan. Therefore everyone had a part in the ceremony. 

Rev. Deloe presented copies of the documents. Pastor Rininger 

gave a sheet to each of the founding men which they put in a 

shredder depositing it into a basket. The paper strips were burned 

in a grill outside. 

At the evening service Jay Fretz, longest serving pastor at 

Sebring, provided a 

challenging message 

with the theme "Using 

our debt-free church 

not as a resting pad, but 

as a launching pad for a 

greater future." Praise 

the Lord. 

Pastor Glenn Rininger 
I 

Pastor Rininger and Jesse Deloe 




14 



C HEI^LD 



Another Top 
Ten List 



By Richard Todd, Pastor 

Community Grace Brethren Church -Whittier, California 

My family and I were involved in a serious auto 
accident Wednesday evening, May 18. I had 
just completed a week of meetings in Ohio with the 
leadership team of CE National. American Airlines brought me back 
into the Los Angeles area that afternoon and Claudia and my son, 
Rory, picked me up at the airport. We finished baseball practice and 
headed home about 8 p.m. We were a few blocks away from home 
when a man ran a red light and smashed into our car (he was doing 
approximately 50 mph). And to top it all off... THE GUY DOESN'T 
HAVE INSURANCE. Friends came and helped us pack up what was 
left of our car and I then took two of my sons to the hospital emergency 
room. 

Over the past few days, I've thought quite a bit about the events 
of the evening of May 18, 1994... received encouragement from many 
of you... and found that I have learned a few things. So I started 
a list of lessons. My family has added to my list and it has quickly 
become another TOP TEN LIST. Here are my thoughts. I'll consider 
any additions you care to share with me from your experience. 

LESSON #1 - I HAVE A LITTLE BETTER VIEW OF WHATS 
IMPORTANT AND WHAT'S NOT AS IMPORTANT. Let's get down 
to the basics of life... I am alive and my family is safe also! 



LESSON #2 - GOD ISN'T THROUGH WITH ME YET. He has 
work for my family to do here on earth still. It's a great feeling to 
know that you can't rush God's schedule. 

LESSON #3 - PRAYER HELPS. PRAYER PREPARES us for 
what we encounter in life. PRAYER SUPPORTS us in carrying the 
burdens of life. 

LESSON #4 - NO ONE IS EXEMPT FROM THE STORMS OF 
LIFE... not minister... not missionary. 

LESSON #5 - LIFE ISN'T FAIR! We didn't ask for what happened 
to us and we didn't deserve what happened. I know a lot of crazy 
drivers that this should have happened to. 

LESSON #6 ■ Air bags are a great new innovation in automotive 
safety but I prefer angel bags. No joking! I think we should push 
for a renewed prayer emphasis for what people have for centuries 
called journey mercies (asking God to protect as we travel). 

LESSON #7 - When you question the circumstances of life stop 
and count your blessings. Make sure you name them one by one 
because it's so easy to overlook what God has done. 

LESSON #8 - ALWAYS WEAR YOUR SEATBELT! 

LESSON #9 - ALWAYS wear your seatbelt! No, this is not a 
typo. As we were headed home on the evening of our accident we 
passed an accident where someone had just been injured and eventually 
died. Somewhere in our car there was a click of a seatbelt being 
put on. 

LESSON #10 - ALWAYS WEAR YOUR SEATBELT! 

Ever wonder what #11 is on people's top 10 lists? Here's my 
number 11: Never leave a beach chair loose in the back seat of 
your car if you are going to have an accident. They give big bruises 
on heads. 



cHEIQLD 



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July/August 1994 



15 



MOLTEN IRON AND 
A MELTED HEART 

by Pastor Davy Troxel - 



It was late in the summer of 1982, 
and tears were running down my 
face as I sat in my car on the 
parking lot of Dal ton foundry, in 
Warsaw, Indiana. My seminary work 
was complete except for my Master's 
thesis, and I wanted to pastor a church 
so badly that I could taste it. I wept to 
think that I had to face even one more 
day in that foundry The jobitself wasn't 
that terrible, but I knew that it wasn't 
what God had put me here to do. I 
wanted to be in the ministry full time, 
and every day at the lab technician job 
was like another day in prison. 

I prayed that the Lord would get 
me through one more day. and open a 
door to a church soon. By the time I got 
inside to the time clock I had regained 
my composure, and no one was the 
wiser about the feelings that stirred me 
inside. I went about my business, pre- 
paring the papers and the pyrometer for 
the daily routine of recording the tem- 
peratures of the molten iron. 

My time was spent mostly in the 
pouring areas: truly an eerie place in 
which to work! I was surrounded by 
three different machines, each resem- 
bling a fiery carnival ride. "The loop" 
was directly in front of me. It was quite 
similar to a chair lift with many more 
seats, each seat carrying a two-foot 
square mold, into which the molten 
iron was poured. The Herman machine 
behind me, and the pallet line on my 
left, made larger molds on what looked 
like level roller coasters. 

But in spite of the "carnival rides," 
the aunosphere was not fun at all. The 
temperature reached 1 1 0° on some sum- 
mer days, higher near the 2500° iron. A 
pungent odor of molten minerals and 



burnt rosin was everywhere. The floor 
was covered with dirty, black sand. 
Lighting was dim, and made worse by 
the constant clouds of smoke which 
often engulfed me and the iron pourers 
like a coastline fog. 

Through the middle of it all ran a 
monorail that brought the molten iron 
to the pourers from the furnace off to 
my right. The monorail ran on a track 
that was fastened to the rafters. Hash- 
ing red lights were on the front and 
back, and a siren sounded whenever 
the cart moved, reminding everyone of 
the instant death carried on board. The 
2500° iron could cook the flesh from 
the bones of any poor soul caught un- 
der the sloshing liquid . When the iron 
was poured into the pourer's ladles, 
showers of sparks would fill the spot 
like thousands of bright, stinging bees 
that burned through clothing and skin 
alike. 

That iron carrier - with its lights, 
siren, and large, smoking cauldron of 
liquid fire - would pull out from in front 
of the twenty-ton furnace sometimes 
every five minutes of more, looking 
forebodingly like an angry dragon 
slowly crawling from its cave, seeking 
the poor rogue who woke it from its 
sleep. Besides die carrier's siren voice, 
the surrounding noise level was always 
deafening, forcing everyone to wear 
earplugs. This made essential commu- 
nication difficult, and not-essential 
communication undesirable. Conse- 
quently, every man worked alone, add- 
ing to the depressing environment. 

I describe all of this in order to 
explain how the place was not unlike 
the mental image that I have of hell. I 
never gazed into that furnace full of 



twenty-tons of molten iron without re- 
calling the scriptures that talk about the 
lake of fire. Yet, inspite of it all, God 
was there, and could make Himself 
known. 

It was in the same morning that I 
prayed for God's help out in the car 
that, as I walked the sandy floor to get 
another round of temperatures a co- 
worker came up to me from behind. 

"You're just who I'm looking for," 
she said. It was a union steward, and 
she held out a white paper sack to me. 
"Your grandfather just passed away 
last month, right?" she asked, and I 
answered that he had. "Well, at the last 
union meeting we voted to stop send- 
ing flowers to families who lost a loved 
one. Now we will give them a Bible 
instead." 

I removed the precious book from 
the sack, and found that it was not just 
a regular Bible but a pulpit Bible, with 
large print for easier use in preaching! 

hi an instant god preached a com- 
plete sermon to me, and was waiting 
for my response to His invitation. He 
had heard my prayer from earlier that 
day, and had answered with this spe- 
cial gift that said, "I know your heart 
and your needs, and I will answer in 
My time." 

It was still two more months be- 
fore the Lord moved me to my first 
pastorate in New Albany, Indiana. But 
His encouraging gift that day made the 
time go much easier. He had a plan, and 
He wanted me to know it. So, right 
there in the middle of that artificial 
hell, he tapped me on the shoulder just 
to say, "For I know the plans I have for 
you. . . plans to prosper you and not to 
harm you, plans to give you hope and a 
future. Then you will call upon me and 
come and pray to me, and I will listen 
to you. You will seek me and find me 
when you seek me with all your heart," 
(Jer. 29:11-13). 

Call upon Him. He truly will hear, 
even from what you might think to be 
hell itself! (Ps. 139:7-12) 



16 



cHEIQLD 



SHOULD A 
DOCTOR 
EVER. END 
YOUR. LIFE? 

By Charlene McMahn 

T T ho decides when we die? 
The answer to that question isn't as 
simple as it used to be. Advances in 
medical technology and changes in 
society have forced us to consider 
what would have been unthinkable in 
the past. 

Fifty years ago we would never 
have debated whether a doctor should 
assist someone in dying, said Profes- 
sor John Jackson, one of the speakers 
who participated in a panel discussion 
last Saturday night sponsored by 
Colonial Chapel of Newington. Speak- 
ers from across the country were in- 
vited to discuss whether it was ethical 
for a doctor to help someone end their 
life. 

"There's been a major shift con- 
cerning religion, God and morality in 
the last 50 years," said Professor Jack- 
son. He said his goal was not to pro- 
vide answers but to raise a lot of 
questions. He is an attorney and law 
professor at Capital Law School in 
Ohio. 

"As a church we thought it was 
important to broaden the debate on 
this issue out of moral and ethical 
concerns. We thought the best ap- 
proach would be to invite profession- 
als from the field of ethics, law and 
medicine to discuss this," said the 
Rev. Kenneth L. Carozza, pastor of 
Colonial Chapel. 

Shirley Groves of Newington 
took notes during the discussion and 
she said she thought all the speakers 
were excellent. "I think they tried to 
bring in both sides as much as they 
could." 

All the doctors on the panel said 
that physicians should not help a pa- 




Members of the panel were (from left) the Rev. Kenneth L. Carozza, pastor of Colonial Chapel; 
Norman Geisler, author and professor of ethics and philosophy in North Carolina; Professor John 
Jackson, attorney and law professor at Capital Law School in Ohio; Dr. David Sahar, cardiologist 
and faculty member at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center; and Dr. Jeffrey Panosian, a 
general surgeon in California. 



tient die and offered various reasons 
why they should not. What if a doctor 
is wrong about a prognosis of a termi- 
nal illness and a patient chooses to die 
based on that prognosis? It is rare, but 
medical records do indicate cases 
where people fully recover after being 
told they were dying. "The argument 
for doctor-assisted death ignores the 
limitations of medical prognosis," said 
Dr. Norman Geisler, an author and 
professor of ethics and philosophy in 
North Carolina. "It's well to remem- 
ber there ' s no return from that choice . 
It allows no room for review or cor- 
rection." 

He said that another argument in 
favor of doctor-assisted suicide sug- 
gests that it is more humane to end the 
life of a terminal patient who is suffer- 
ing excruciating pain. By refusing to 
allow mercy killing, aren't we treat- 
ing humans worse than animals? 

"This argument assumes there's 
no value in suffering, however," said 
Dr. Geisler. Patients who experience 
pain sometimes learn valuable les- 
sons and serve as positive role models 
for others. "It's precisely because hu- 
mans are not animals that they 
shouldn' t be treated in the same way," 
said Dr. Geisler. "These arguments 
favor the quality of life over the sanc- 
tity of life." 

It's also important to consider 
that a patient's state of mind can 
change. At a low point a patient may 
feel a sense of hopelessness and ex- 



press the desire to die, but that could 
be temporary, said Dr. David Sahar, 
cardiologist and faculty member at 
Columbia Presbyterian Medical Cen- 
ter in New York. 

All the doctors said they were 
concerned about where doctor-assisted 
death could lead. "Once we institu- 
tionalize death as acceptable to soci- 
ety, maybe the next determination will 
be to make that decision for someone 
else, and that scares me," said Profes- 
sor Jackson. Could it become a way to 
eliminate those patients who are too 
sick, too poor or minorities? 

Professor Jackson said it was cru- 
cial for the public to consider the 
ethics of this issue before laws were 
passed. He said that a bill was pro- 
posed this session in the Connecticut 
legislature that would have provided a 
legal defense for doctors who helped 
a terminally ill patient to die. The bill 
did not legalize doctor-assisted death 
and was ultimately dropped, but he 
predicted that legislatures across the 
country would consider the issue in 
the future. 

Reverend Carozza invited mem- 
bers of Congress from Connecticut 
and local and state legislators to the 
event, but none attended. 

Dr. Jeffrey Panosian acknowl- 
edged that doctors are poorly trained 
in pain management and that has con- 
tributed to patients wanting to take 

continued on page 21 



July/August 1994 



17 



FOREIGN MISSIONS 



TOWAKPAP2000 



by Tom Julien 



One thing seems evident ! God is choosing His 
team of churches in these significant times. 
They are churches who realize that they 
are in the world on mission, not just to 
maintain their existence. They are able to 
wrap their arms around the globe - reaching out to their 
Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria and the ends of the earth. They 
are participants, not just spectators, in the unfolding drama 
of redemption. 

Our decade is unique in the history of the church. More 
people are coming to a personal knowledge of Christ than 
ever before. More people are praying for world evangeliza- 
tion. (We are witnessing the greatest coordinated effort of 
Christians to reach the world ever. Countries that were off 
limits to missions are now open to the Gospel.) 

"God be gracious to us and bless us, and cause His face 
to shine upon us-that Thy way may be known on the earth, 
Thy salvation among all nations." Psalm 67:1-2 

God's blessing has a purpose-to enable churches to 
fulfill their mission to the world. 

Two encounters with enormous implications for mis- 
sions are recorded in Matthew's Gospel. The first is the 
meeting of Jesus with His disciples in the region of Caesarea 
Philippi. After Peter's great confession, the Lord turns to 
him and utters these words, "On this rock I will build my 
Church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it." 
(Matthew 16:18) 

The church is ekklesia-an assembly of called out ones. 
She is missionary by her very nature. Only as she continues 
to call out can she continue to exist as an authentic expres- 
sion of the bride and body of Christ. 

The second encounter occurs several months later, 
after the death and resurrection of the Lord. There, in a 
formal injunction to those who were to become the founda- 
tion pillars of the Church He would build, Jesus said, "Go 
and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the 
name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 
teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you." 
(Matthew 28:19) 

What we call the Great Commission is more than a 
commandment to be obeyed. It is the formal declaration of 
the mission of the church and her fundamental law of 
existence. By this we mean that mission is an expression of 
the essential nature and life of the Church. The Great 
Commission is to the Church what breathing is to the body. 

These two encounters represent two streams in divine 
revelation that are brought together on the day of Pentecost 
to form a mighty river. On that day, when the Spirit of the 



Lord fell upon the disciples who were praying in the upper 
room, the promise of our Lord was fulfilled, for the church 
was born. The first act of those who formed the infant 
church was to spill out into the streets of Jerusalem pro- 
claiming the Good News to the ones who had crucified their 
Savior, and the church grew to 3,000 by the end of the day. 
From then on, the story of the book of Acts shows how the 
Apostles wove together the Church and the Great Commis- 
sion into the fabric of their ministries, to such an extent that 
you can only see the Church through the Great Commis- 
sion, and you can only see the Great Commission through 
the Church. 

Pentecost represents a marriage between the Church 
and her mission. On the day of Pentecost Jesus, the Head, 
was joined to His body. He came to seek and to save the lost; 
His mission can only be accomplished through His Church. 
His Spirit is the Paraklete-the one who comes alongside to 
call out men and women from darkness to light. When we 
are willing to be His witnesses, He speaks through us. 

Jesus once said concerning marriage, "What God has 
joined together, let not man separate." A sensitive reading 
of the New Testament reveals that there has been an organic 
union between two things, the Church and her mission. Yet, 
history has effectively put asunder what God intended to be 
forever one, to the extent 
that the Church and mis- 
sions occupy two distinct 
compartments in the 
thinking of most Chris- 
tians. 

The results are sadly 
evident. Whenever the 
Church has lost sight of 
the Great Commission she 
has inevitably become a 
mere ecclesiastical insti- 
tution. The life-giving Spirit is quenched and grieved when 
the Church, the body of Christ, no longer allows herself to 
be the Lord's witness in the world. 

As we look toward AD 2000, we see years of spiritual 
harvest. The question that should haunt us is whether we 
will be participants of that harvest. Is your church a part of 
God's team? It can be. He has chosen you-have you 
responded? Youreffectiveness in the great adventure of our 
decade will be related to your ability to pull back together 
what God never intended to be separated: the Church and 
her world-wide mission. 




18 



IJEF^LD 



Honoring and 

Praying for 

i our i asror bydalescmafer 

I was in Cincinnati for a conference in which I was 
playing a significant role, and I was afraid. I had been given 
a large responsibility, and I questioned my ability to handle 
it. I had told my church these feelings on the Sunday prior 
to my two-week absence. I had pleaded with them for 
prayer. Now, nine days later, I returned to my hotel and 
stopped off at the front desk to see if I had received any mail . 
I had a telegram, the clerk said; it contained only three 
words: "We Love You!" 

That message was followed by 12 pages of single- 
spaced, typed names of people from my church. During the 
announcements at church the day before, the congregation 
had been reminded that the upcoming Tuesday was my big 
day. Anyone who wanted to encourage me was invited to 
stop in the back and sign up for the telegram. As I read those 
names, all 12 pages, I felt ten feet tall. I knew they were 
praying and thinking about me. At that moment, I felt I 
could have done anything because I was so affirmed and 
supported. 

That evening, one of my best friends (also apastor) and 
I went to see the Cincinnati Reds play a baseball game. 
While we were sitting in the stands, I told him about the 
telegram. Even years later, as I sit writing this, I can still see 
his face. He looked me straight in the eyes and, with tears 
running down his cheeks, said, "Once, just once, I wish 
somebody in my church would tell me they loved me." 

What I have discovered since that night, and what 
surveys of pastors show, is that an overwhelming number 
of ministers share my friend's sentiment. They feel un- 
loved, unappreciated, and unprayed for. 

Promise Keepers is committed to changing this situa- 
tion by calling men to "honor and pray for their pastors. " 

Honor 

All Christians are called to practice honor. Romans 
12:10 says, "Honor one another above yourselves." God 
calls us to esteem, respect, and show deference to each 
other in the Body of Christ. When it comes to pastors, 
however, the Word of God says something unique. We read 
in 1 Thessalonians 5:12-13, "Now we ask you, brothers, to 
respect those who work hard among you, who are over you 
in the Lord and who admonish you. Hold them in the 
highest regard in love because of their work." 

The phrase "Hold them in the highest regard" is 
unusual in the original Greek of the New Testament in that 
it takes the adverb and triples its intensity. This verse could 
read, "Hold them beyond the highest regard in love." Or it 
might be rendered, "Honor, honor, honor in love those who 
work hard among you." In today's wording, we might 
paraphrase it, "Esteem to the max in love those who work 
hard among you." What we sense here is the apostle Paul's 
struggle-almost being at a loss for words-to adequately 



express what the Holy Spirit wants to communicate to the 
church, just how much the people in a congregation are to 
hold their pastor in super highest regard. Pastors are not to 
be esteemed for their office, degrees, age, or spiritual gifts, 
but "because of their work." 

The biblical pattern, then, is for all Christians to show 
honor to one another, and triple honor to their pastors. 

Now, if that's the case, why are pastors not honored in 
our day? First, our culture encourages us to not show honor 
to anyone. We live in a day of egalitarianism that doesn't 
allow for differences and appears to treat all people the 
same. Political and sports cartoonists ridicule those in 
authority. Comedians poke fun at anyone in a place of 
prominence. And the average Christian carries that same 
attitude into the church. 

I believe the major reason pastors are not honored, 
however, is that church members don't know it's one of 
their responsibilities in following Jesus Christ. Somechurch 
members simply enjoy tearing down their pastor, but the 
vast majority fail to honor their pastor just because they are 
ignorant of God's Word. One pastor, Steve, with whom I 
spoke in preparation for writing this chapter brought some 
men from his church to the Promise Keepers '93 confer- 
ence. He told me that since then, things had changed 
dramatically because his men heard Coach McCartney talk 
about a man's responsibility to his pastor. "The men of my 
church didn't have bad hearts," Steve said. "They just 
needed an external source to explain the truth of God's 
Word to them." 

How is it that people in the church don't know this 
teaching to honor their pastors? The answer is that it hasn't 
been taught. I searched through the books of sermons in my 
library, some many years old and others quite contempo- 
rary, but I could not find one sermon on this topic. Given our 
age, it's obvious why this is the case. Can you imagine your 
pastor standing in the pulpit next Sunday and stating, no 
matter how smoothly, "You as a church body are to give me 
triple honor"? As soon as you entered your car, you would 
be saying, "What an egotist! I can't believe the turkey 
would say something like that. Wow, is he ever full of 
pride!" Because that's the way most people would react, 
pastors shy away from this teaching, and the American 
church continues in its ignorant disobedience to this clear 
command of God. 

Promise Keepers is committed to seeing that this 
biblical truth is recaptured in the church .By the grace of 
God, we are determined to eliminate the neglect and dis- 
honor of our pastors. With fierce determination, Christian 
men are being called to take the lead in bringing triple honor 
to our pastors. 

What would it look like to honor our pastors? Let's 
take a closer look at Steve's story. 

In his own words, Steve was "at a point of depression." 
Disheartened with the ministry at his church, he had already 
written a letter of resignation. In fact, the letter was signed 
and on his desk when he and some of his men left for the 
Promise Keepers conference. As the men listened to Coach 
Mac, they came under strong conviction for their failure to 
honor their pastor. And during a sharing time in the worship 
service the next Sunday, a number of them stood and 



July/August 1994 



19 



repented of their sin of not honoring and encouraging their 
pastor. They also acknowledged their sin of expecting him 
to do all the ministry while they stood on the sidelines and 
griped. 

"Overnight there was a change in my church," Steve 
said. "The entire dynamic of our church is changing. They 
have freed me to do what I was called to do. Beyond that, 
they have started a Monday morning prayer time where a 
part of the time is devoted to prayer for me." With great 
delight, Steve ripped up his letter of resignation, and he and 
his church are now working together as a team. Why? Part 
of the answer has to be that men came to see the biblical 
necessity of honoring their pastor. As a result of their 
obedience, God is now free to pour out His blessing. 

Perhaps you're thinking at this point, Could this hon- 
oring thing go too far? Could this feed an ego problem? 
Might this cause jealousy? Undoubtedly, those concerns 
are possibilities. If I were writing to pastors, I would digress 
at this point to deal with the sins of pride and arrogance with 
which pastors might be tempted. But right now, at this point 
in the history of the American church, those sins are not the 
problem. The hurt, the neglect, the dishonoring have gone 
on for so long, and with such intensity, that large numbers 
or pastors are turning in their resignations because they feel 
so alone and unsupported. One recent poll revealed that 80 
percent of the pastors responding had thought about quit- 
ting in the last three months. Yes, in some immature men, 
triple honoring might cause a problem, But for the vast 
majority of godly pastors, honoring and lifting them up will 
cause them to be more motivated and even harder workers. 
They will be encouraged, and their churches will be blessed. 

As a pastor, I, too, stood on the floor of the football 
stadium at Promise Keepers '93. 1 reveled in the prolonged 
standing ovation the more than 50,000 gathered men gave 
to all the pastors who were there. In the providence of God, 
I stood next to a pastor I didn't know. He said, "This will be 

enough for me to be able to put up with all the I'll take 

at my church for the next six months !" Honoring him in this 
manner had put a new resolve and a new desire in his heart 
to go back and pastor his church in what was obviously a 
tough situation. Now, if the men of that church honored and 
encouraged him regularly, what effect would it have? 

What would happen if you regularly honored and 
encouraged your pastor? I believe your church would begin 
to receive blessing as never before. Why? Because the 
blessing of God comes when we obey His Word. 

Prayer 

Promise Keepers are also committed to praying for 
their pastors. The concept of praying for all Christians is 
clearly spelled out in the Bible: "And pray in the Spirit on 
all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With 
this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the 
saints" (Eph. 6:18). 

When it comes to praying for our pastors, we have a 
special responsibility. Paul, an apostle and pastor, said, "I 
urge you, brothers, by our Lord Jesus Christ and by the love 
of the Spirit, to join me in my struggle by praying to God for 
me" (Rom. 15:30). In another place, he reminded his 
readers that they could help him and his ministry team "by 



your prayers" (2 Cor. 1:1 1). In other words, pastors espe- 
cially are in need of prayer. 

Why is that the case? Satan's desire is to destroy the 
work of Christ in the world. One of his most effective ways 
of doing that is to destroy pastors. If Satan can bring them 
down, causing disgrace and ridicule to taint the work of 
Christ, the nonbelieving world will not be attracted to Jesus. 
We have all seen the carnage left around us as pastors have 
failed morally or have simply left the ministry because of 
disillusionment. 

Several years ago, a pastor in Denver told his congre- 
gation the following true story. A lady from his church was 
flying back to Denver, and as the meal was served, she 
noticed the woman sitting next to her did not take a meal. 
To make conversation, the Christian woman asked, "Are 
you on a diet?" 

"No," came the reply, "I am a member of the church of 
Satan, and we are fasting for the destruction of the families 
of pastors and Christian leaders." 

Pastors are at risk because they are the church's lead- 
ers. If Satan can get them, the church of Jesus Christ will be 
crippled. 

In no way am I trying to excuse the pastors who have 
fallen or bailed out of the ministry in recent years, but I do 
have a question. How many of those pastors had men in 
their churches who daily brought them before the Lord in 
prayer? I wonder how many men's groups gathered to pray 
for them? I am not surprised by the number of pastors who 
have fallen. To be truthful, I'm surprised the number is not 
larger. The job of being a pastor is enormously difficult and 
is made even more so because the men of the church are not 
praying. 

Pastors need prayer especially for their preaching and 
teaching of the Word. Again I ask, why are pastors not 
preaching what they really believe, that they are afraid- 
afraid the people of their churches will not accept the kind 
of preaching that clearly and powerfully confronts sin and 
sinners. Afraid they will be fired and lose their financial 
security. As a result, in many cases, God's purposes are 
thwarted and our churches remain weak and sick. 

The apostle Paul regularly asked for prayer so that 
"boldness might be given." Pastors need to know their men 
are with them and are praying for them so they can be 
emboldened to share the whole council of God and not 
cower in the face of opposition within or without the 
church. 

E.M. Bounds said it this way: 

The men in the pew given to praying for the pastor are 
like poles which hold up the wires along which the electric 
current runs. They are not the power, neither are they the 
specific agents in making the Word of the Lord effective. 
But they hold up the wires upon which the divine power 
runs to the hearts of men. . . They make conditions favorable 
for the preaching of the Gospel (A treasury ofPrayer-The 
Best of E.M. Bounds [Minneapolis: Bethany House, 1961], 
pp. 172-72) 

I don't understand it all; I just know that when the men 
of the church start praying for the pastor, something hap- 
pens. 

Dr. Wilbur Chapman often told of going to Philadel- 



20 



C HEI^LD 



phia to become the pastor of the Wanamaker Church. After 
his first sermon, an older gentleman met him in front of the 
pulpit and said, "You. are pretty young to be the pastor of 
this great church. We have always had older pastors. I am 
afraid you won't succeed. But you preach the gospel, and 
I am going to help you all I can." 

"I looked at him," said Dr. Chapman, "and said to 
myself: 'Here's a crank.' But the old gentleman continued: 
'I am going to pray for you that you may have the Holy 
Spirit's power upon you, and two others have covenanted 
to join me.'" Then Dr. Chapman related the outcome: 

I did not feel so bad when I learned he was going to pray 
for me. The three became ten, the ten became twenty, the 
twenty became fifty, the fifty became two hundred who met 
before the service to pray that the Holy Spirit might come 
upon me. In another room, eighteen elders knelt so close 
around me to pray for me that I could put out my hands and 
touch them on all sides. I always went into the pulpit feeling 
that I would have the anointing in answer to the prayers of 
two hundred and nineteen men. It was easy to preach, a very 
joy. Anybody could preach with such conditions. And what 
was the result? We received 1,100 into our church by 
conversion in three years, 600 of which were men. I do not 
see how the average preacher under average conditions 
preaches at all. Church members have much more to do 
than go to church as curious, idle spectators, to be amused 
and entertained. It is their business to pray mightily that the 
Holy Ghost will clothe the preacher and make his words 
like dynamite. (John Maxwell, in a letter to church leaders, 
quoting A.M. Hills in Pentecostal Light) 

Imagine what would happen if you and the other men 
from your church determined to pray for your pastor. The 
whole dynamic and atmosphere of your church would be 
different. 

What would it look like to start such a prayer ministry? 
In the church I serve, men are asked once a year to sign up 
to be prayer partners with me. At least one man is assigned 
to pray for me each day of the month. When that list is 
drawn up, I pray for the man who is praying for me on that 
day as well . To further assist my prayer partners, I regularly 
send them a letter to keep them current on answers to their 
prayers and new things for which they can be praying. 

The entire group that signed up is also divided into four 
teams. Each team is assigned one Sunday a month to come 



to the church to pray for me. (Fifth Sundays are left 
unassigned, and any team member can come. Usually, the 
meetings are packed!) The men arrive at 8: 15 a.m, as our 
first service is at 9:00. They disperse throughout the entire 
church facility. Some stay in the worship center, praying for 
the worship team and others participating in the service, as 
well as for those who will attend the services. Others move 
through the classrooms, praying for teachers by name. Still 
others walk in the parking lot, asking God to keep things 
organized and friendly, and that the sweet Spirit of Jesus 
will be sensed by folks as they pull into the lot. At 8:30, we 
all gather in my office, and they pray for me. I tell them what 
I think God wants me to do that day, plus how I am feeling 
both physically and spiritually. Then I kneel and the men 
gather around, lay hands on me, and begin to pray. 

The results have been dramatic. I have sensed a new 
power and authority in my preaching. The men who pray 
have a sense of personal ownership of Sunday mornings. 
They know their prayers are essential if anything of eternal 
significance is to take place. Further, the Lord has built a 
wonderful sense of teamwork through this prayer partner- 
ship. Sometimes as I'm preaching, I catch the eye of one of 
them, and he' 11 wink or give me the thumbs-up sign. When 
that occurs, I know they are praying and are/or me, and then 
I really "go to preachin' !" 

Let me suggest that you go to your pastor and tell him 
you want to organize a team of men who will pray for him 
every day. Tell him you and this group of men wish to meet 
him on Sundays before services to pray for the anointing of 
the Holy Spirit to come upon him. If you do this, it will be 
one of the greatest joys your pastor has ever had in his 
ministry. 

Why do I know that' s true? Because the overwhelming 
majority of pastors feel unprayed for and isolated in their 
ministries. One pastor said to me not long ago, "Nobody in 
my church cares about me or the ministry of this church." 
Suppose the men of his church came around him and asked 
to pray for him. What do you think would happen? That 
church would never be the same again. 



This excerpt was taken trom the book Seven Promises of a Promise Keeper, 

published by Focus on the Family. 

© 1994. Promise Keepers. All rights reserved. International copyright secured. 

Used by permission, Focus on the Family. 



continued from page 1 7 

matters into their hands, but he felt it was "misguided 

compassion to take someone's life." 

The medical oath that every doctor takes advises that 
a doctor must "first do no harm," he said. 

It is important for people to consider that it's not just 
simply a technical question to take someone's life. "It's 
really the question of the origin of life," said Dr. Panosian. 

Mary Hannifan of Newington said she learned a lot 
from the discussion and agreed with the doctors. "I just feel 
a doctor should not be able to take someone's life. Only 
God can do that," she said. 

But Ruth Kellogg of Newington felt there are times 
when it is appropriate to end someone's suffering. She said 



her sister was in excruciating pain for more than a year 
before she died of cancer. The pain was so bad at one point 
that her sister tried to jump out the window at the hospital. 
"It took four interns to get her back," she said. "There was 
no dignity and no hope for her." 

Reverend Carozza said he realized that not everyone 
would agree with the views presented, but he hoped that the 
panel discussion would encourage people to consider the 
issue carefully. 

"We thought it was a great idea for a church to do this," 
said Reverend Carozza. "We must ask the right questions 
because this has societal impact." 



July/August 1994 



21 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



'Zf&uxtd 1tecu4>Utte 



June 12 will be mortgage burning day for the Kent, Washing- 
ton Grace Brethren Church. The program will be at 4:00 p.m.. The 
service of four pastors and one associate will be acknowledged, as 
well as charter members and the original building committee. 

Rittman, Ohio GBC: Jason and Marcie Haymaker will come 
to be youth pastor, moving in on June 10th to assume their new role 
on June 12th. Buddy Olszewski is the senior pastor. 

First Grace Brethren Church of Philadelphia, PA: 115 were in 
attendance at a First Love Renewal seminar led by Ron Thompson 
and Lee Dice in April. Thirty individuals stood at the altar, conse- 
crating themselves to become a dedicated minority to change the 
world. The church, pastored by Mike Brubaker, is already imple- 
menting strategy to impact their community for Christ. 

Ralph and Joan Justiniano reaching the Japanese for Christ: 

1) 16 families opened their homes for us to put on Japanese 
dinners and share with 237 people about our mission in 
Japan. 

2) After an intense trip in Ohio, doing 1 1 dinners in 13 nights, 
we still have our sanity and an even greater spiritual drive! 

3) We now have over $62,000 inannual support commitments 
(over 75% of our need!), and our prayer team has grown 
strong! 

4) The kids have handled the travel very well, and any 
sicknesses in the family have been minor. 

5) Our 180,000 mile-old car is still running well. 

Grace Seminary offers new counseling degree: In the fall 
semester of 1 994 the Master of Divinity in Counseling degree will 
be launched. This M.Div. program will provide instruction in 
theology, the original languages of the Bible, and the background 
studies that are essential to prepare for serious Bible study. As a 
counseling program, it will also supply the comprehensive instruc- 
tion and interaction that is needed to prepare a person to effectively 
counsel others within the context of the local church. Both facets 
will be pursued in a distinctly Christian way, with an unwavering 
commitment to the authority and sufficiency of the Bible. "The true 
biblical counseling we will teach is helping individuals find God 
and walk on his path-a program that is both biblical and relevant," 
says Dr. Tom Edgington, Professor of Counseling. 

Wednesday, June 15, begins CE National's leadership orien- 
tation for Operation Barnabas. Team members' orientation train- 
ing begins Tuesday, June 21, in Ashland, Ohio. Seventy-eight team 
members and leaders depart for tour on Friday, July 1, ministering 
in Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Teams con- 
clude their ministry at National Conference in Florida prior to 
departing for debriefing in Roanoke, Virginia. Final ministry 
opportunities for Operation Barnabas conclude at BNYC in 
Lynchburg, Virginia. Please pray for our Operation Barnabas 
team members and leaders as they serve our churches in the FGBC 
and as team members gain a heart for the lost and a thirst for 
ministry. 

Rev. Ron Thompson was the featured speaker at the Iowa- 



Midlands District Conference held June 10-11 at Dallas Center, 
Iowa. Pastor Greg and Nancy Sharp were hosts. What a tremendous 
host couple they were! 

FOCUS II Concludes! An emphasis designed to create a new 
spirit of unity, identity and team ministry in the FGBC was com- 
pleted at Sandy Cove Conference Grounds in April. Approximately 
80 pastors from the Northeastern region of the United States met for 
two days of prayer, discussion and spiritual renewal. Grace Breth- 
ren leaders from most of the national boards directed the retreat. 
Ron Thompson led in the music and worship. Retreats were also 
conducted this past fall and winter in the Central, Southeast, 
Southwest and Northwest portions of the United States. A special 
FOCUS gathering is currently being consideredfor Friday evening 
prior to National Conference this year. Very positive and encour- 
aging evaluations have come from those who have attended. 

Brethren National Youth Conference is right around the 
corner. This year's youth conference is being held at Liberty 
University in Lynchburg, Virginia from July 30-August 5. Speak- 
ers include Greg Speck, a dynamic challenger for young people and 
author of Sex, It's Worth Waiting For and Living for Jesus 
When the Party's Over; Sammy Tippit, an international evange- 
listic speaker and founder and president of God's Love in Action; 
and Barry St. Clair, founder of Reach Out Ministries and author of 
more than twenty books for students and leaders. There will be 
musical ministry by well-known Christian recording artists Al 
Denson, 4 Him, and Rhythm & News as well. 

The Grace Brethren Church of Kent, Washington has called 
Richard S. Brown, Jr. to be associate pastor with special emphasis 
on youth. Senior pastor is Jack Rants. 

Pastor Dean Risser has produced a simplified version of the 
bridge tract that takes less time to share, making it an ideal 
evangelistic tool for use with children. It is attractively printed and 
can be custom designed with your own church logo and address 
imprinted. For samples and prices contact Dean Risser at (419)281- 
0332. 

Ron Thompson has just produced a new instrumental cassette, 
Just Ron.. . Again. This commercially made tape sells for $6, but 
anyone making a contribution of $25 or more to BEM will receive 
a free tape postpaid in the mail. Write to Brethren Evangelistic 
Ministries, P.O. Box 333, Winona Lake, IN 46590. 

A team of workers from the Waldorf, Maryland GBC is 
scheduled to complete the construction of the Grace Brethren 
church building in Montevideo, Uruguay, during the first week of 
August. Another work and evangelism team is being formed in 
order to construct a building for the Berazategui, Argentina GBC in 
late November. 

Cuba bound... Armando Viyeira and Teo Huerta, two Grace 
Brethren leaders from the Mexico Border churches, are planning 
to go to Cuba for several months this fall. They will serve with local 
churches under the leadership of Cuban pastor Ernesto Alfonso, as 
well as start making contacts and evangelizing in a target area for 
a Grace Brethren Church. Armando and Teo will return from their 
trip in time to give a first-hand report to the Equipo Internacional 
Conference, which convenes at the end of October. The Equipo 
Internacional is the mission partnership of the Guatemala, Mexico, 
and Mexican Border Grace Brethren Churches. 



22 



C HEI^LD 



Wooden Block Building Replica of 

"McClain Hall" (similar in type to "Cat's Meow" buildings) 

Perfect for a gift or collector's piece! 

$12.50 each (5% sales tax for Indiana residents) plus $1.75 for shipping and handling 

Size 10" long by 4" high (to the steeple) 

-Will be available at National Conference- 

For more information, call (219) 267-2982 
To order, write: Richard Brundage 
- 1 323 W. 200 S. • Warsaw, IN 46580 

m (No COD's or charge cards, PLEASE!) 

Other buildings, such as Billy Sunday Tabernacle and Beyer Home, 
will be available later this summer. 




The Brethren Adult series for September, October and November 



features 



Studies In Genesis 




This study guide by Rev. John Burke is a survey of the Book 
of Beginnings. The last chapter takes you through the rest of 
the Bible. 



$5.95 



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multiple copies-actual shipping costs) 



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Waterloo, Iowa. He is a graduate of Fort Wayne Bible College 
and Grace Theological Seminary, he has served four pastorates: 
Leesburg, Indiana; Wheaton, Illinois; Akron, Ohio; and Water- 
loo, Iowa. 



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WMC Suggested 
Reading Books 



1994-1995 
Live in God's Kindness 

by Marguerite G. Dunning 

French Equatorial Africa was largely unexplored in January, 1918, when James and Florence Gribble, with their little 
daughter Marguerite and two other ladies sailed from new Orleans to open a part of that vast area to the Gospel. 
Marguerite survived four perilous years there, grew up to marry Harold Dunning and, with him and their three daugh- 
ters served 25 years in that same country. Now you can experience the thrill of those early years as Marguerite 
describes them in her book Live in God's Kindness. Reviewed by Mary Thompson. 




When God Doesn't Make Sense 

by Dr. James Dobson 

What is faith? What does it mean to trust God? How do faith and trust figure in when life is topsy-turvy, crummy and 
totally confusing? Where are the answers to all those nagging questions? Is God really there and does He care? 

Our reasoning and intellect are incapable of producing answers, "but valid answers always exist." They are God's 
answers. "He will not parade His plans and purposes for our approval. We must never forget that He is God. He wants 
us to believe and trust in Him despite the things we don't understand." 

I recommend this book for anyone-before, during, or after one of life's totally confusing happenings. Reviewed by 
Miriam Pacheco. 




The Women of Catawba 

by Hilda Stahl 

This historical novel tells of a young widow and her adventures as she comes to America by ship from England in 
1 800. She had some interesting experiences on the ship and through some good and bad experiences ended up at 
Catawba, a plantation in its beginning stages near Charleston, South Carolina. Throughout the book the main characters 
displayed a love for the Lord and a complete dependence on Him through prayer and guidance in every situation. 
Reviewed by Lillian Teeter. 



Q Live in God's Kindness 
@$9.95 

□ When God Doesn't Make Sense 
@ $17.99 

Q The Women of Catawba 
@ $9.99 

□ Purchase all three WMC books for 
the special price of $35.00. We pay 
shipping charges when payment is sent 
with order. 



WMC Suggested Reading Books 
Order Form 1994-1995 

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Above prices subject to change if book publishers increase prices. 
If only one book is ordered, please add $1.85 for shipping. 



For other WMC literature use the WMC order blank. Send it to the WMC literature secretary. 

Send this book order to: Brethren Missionary Herald 

P.O. Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Or order by phone at: 1-800-348-2756 (between 8:00-5:00 Eastern Standard Time) 



EDITORIAL 



TONYA, MICHAEL, AND OJ. 



Tonya Harding, Michael Fay and O.J. Simpson - what 
do they have in common? Each has been caught in 
a criminal investigation with all of the evidence 
pointing to their involvement and guilt. Then each of the 
persons implicated, subsequently, has denied any knowl- 
edge of or involvement in the crime. 

What is so troubling in each of the cases is how hard it 
has become for people to 'fess up and admit to their sin, The 
question is no longer: What is the truth? But, what can my 
lawyer get the jury to believe? Of course we could mention 
other high-profile cases such as Dan Rostenkowski or the 
Menendez brothers in California that lead us to conclude 

that there is no justice in this world today. 

Even more disturbing is the condition that the Apostle 
Paul described as a "seared conscience." It is interesting to 
me that Paul mentions, in this case, those who tell lies so 
often that their consciences do not even bother them any- 
more (I Timothy 4:2). John MacArthur labelled the prob- 
lem in his latest book, The Vanishing Conscience, as just 
that: Our conscience has vanished. Now we say to our own 
peril: "Let your conscience be your guide!" 

Coupled with these crises in character, are there cheer- 
leaders on the sidelines? Every day we saw Tonya Harding 
go to her skating practice to be greeted enthusiastically by 
her supporters. Michael Fay was convicted in Singapore 
and then defended by the President of the United States! 
Then O.J. was cheered on by his fans as he fled in his 
Bronco from police. Each one of these characters has 
achieved notoriety and will cash in on their fame. Let's be 
honest. In the United States, crime does pay! 

Newsweek magazine devoted the major portion of its 
June 13 issue to what was entitled "The Politics of Virtue: 




The Crusade Against America's Moral Decline." A quote 
from the lead article helps us identify our national problem. 
The expert says, 
"You can be a vir- 
tuous person with- 
out faith in God." 
(Newsweek, June 
13, 1994, p. 33). 
This obviously is 
our problem. We 
have tried the athe- 
istic approach for 
more than 30 years. 
We have released 
man from responsi- 
bility to God. We 
have added law 
upon law to control 
the resultant barbar- 
ians that have arisen 

from this moral cesspool. Former Justice of the Supreme 
Court Oliver Wendell Holmes put it this way: 

Law reflects, but in no sense 

determines the moral worth of a society. 

The values of a reasonably just society 

will reflect themselves in a reasonably just law. 

The better the society, the less law there will be. 

In Heaven there will be no law, 

and the lion will lie down with the lamb. 

The values of an unjust society 

will reflect themselves in an unjust law. 

The worse the society, the more law there will be. 

In Hell there will be nothing but law, 

and due process will be meticulously observed. 

Well, I certainly cannot solve this moral crisis. But, 
just maybe, we Christians who live in the United States 
could ready ourselves to articulate God's answers to our 
nation's problems. Just maybe we could recommit our lives 
to become people who are above reproach. Thank God for 
the pastors and their people who are already leading this 
lifestyle. And, as a fellowship of churches, let's take the 
offensive. Let's march and expand our efforts. Never 
before have there been more Tonyas, Michaels, and O. J.s to 
reach. Can I get a witness? 



September 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



RETHREN MISSIONARY 




Volume 56 No. 8 



September 1 994 











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. 


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1 


- ^- .. ci 1 



3 EDITORIAL 

Tonya, Michael and O.J. 

5 CHURCH FOCUS 
Fielding the Dream of Eternity 

6 SPORTS 

On the Disabled List 

7 Oh, No! I'm Out of Gas! 



8 WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

National WMC President's Address 

9 CE NATIONAL 

Ministry Ideas for You 

10 EDUCATION 

Where Is Seminary Education Going? 
Part 2 



12 Response to Article on Bible 
Contradictions 



14 Politically Correct Values Replace 3 R's 
16 Herald Newsline 
18 Fellowship News 



Cover picture may be ordered in poster form 

13Va x 19 at $3.00 plus shipping 

from Herald Bookstore. 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

Ron Thompson 
CE National 

Dan McMaster 
Foreign Missions 
Tom Julien 
Kip Cone 
Grace Schools 

Ron Manahan 
Kathryn Scanland 
Home Missions 

Larry N. Chamberlain 
Jesse B. Deloe 
Women's Missionary Council 
Mary Thompson 

Herald Newsline: 
(219)267-7826 



Cover picture by Ron Kimball 

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C HEI^LD 



CHURCH FOCUS 



Grace Brethren Church of Lexington 

Fielding the 
Dream of Eternity 

by Maryanne B. Wise 



"If you build it, they will come." A make believe dream 
of baseball players who weren't. "If you build a seeker- 
targeted church, the seekers will come." A reality of eternity 
with the One who seeks and saves the lost. Pastor David Atkins 
and the Grace Brethren Church of Lexington, Ohio, 'fielded 
the dream' of presenting Sunday morning services to the 
unbeliever. And they scored. 

"God has called us to do something different," says Pastor 
Dave. "The message, the good news of Jesus Christ, is the 
same. We just changed the delivery to meet the unbeliever 
where he's at." 

The Game Plan 

In. 1989, Pastor Dave and key leadership of the Grace 
Brethren Church of Lexington (Grace) determined it was not 
possible to evangelize, edify and worship within the confines 
of one service, and minister effectively to those who have 
needs in each of those areas. They felt that seekers, the 
recipients of the evangelistic message, have needs that vastly 
differ from those of believers, and that it is difficult for a seeker 
to relate to the terminology, customs and routines that are often 
part of a service that is designed to minister to the believer. 
Grace's mission is to reach seekers by providing a service that 
is designed specifically to meet their needs. "We try to deter- 
mine what the seeker is thinking about-how to relate to him 
musically, what topic he's interested in hearing, and how we 
can apply Scripture to where he is today." 

The two services at Grace (becoming three in the Fall) are 
driven thematically from beginning to end through contempo- 
rary music, drama, scripture reading, and a well planned, 
topical sermon. Sermon series topics have included "The Road 
to Recovery," "The Purpose Driven Life," Nine Secrets to 
Healthy Relationships," and "Essential Equipment for Life." 
The mission is to communicate a message that the unbeliever 
understands, relates to, and so desires to come back for more. 
"Our goal is not to get them down the aisle, it is to get them 
back the following week," says pastor Dave. "We have tracked 
that if an unbeliever comes to Grace for at least six weeks, it's 
almost 100% likely that he or she will become a believer." 

Working Toward A No Hitter 

Planning the services to glorify God, every detail from 
microphone placement to song selection and delivery, from 
upkeep of the grounds to an informative and attractive bulletin, 
exudes excellence. "If we are going to gain a hearing with the 
unbeliever, it is imperative that we speak to him or her, 
verbally as well as nonverbally, with excellence. They are 
looking for only one excuse so they can hit the door and 
dismiss the message. If they perceive we are careless and 
unconcerned about how we communicate the message, then 







m 

ll 

■ > 


1, / ■■ iiii 



the message must not be that important," remarks Pastor Dave. 
To pursue this excellence, the staff gathers every Monday 
afternoon to view a video tape of the previous day's service to 
evaluate and see what could be improved upon. 

Feeding the Players 

The believers at Grace are a big part of the game plan. 
They are strongly encouraged to build a relationship of integ- 
rity with their unbelieving friends. Since most unbelievers do 
not respond immediately to their friend's relationship with 
Christ, Grace has become a safe place to bring unbelievers so 
they will continue to be challenged in a relevant, creative, and 
contemporary way to consider the claims of Christ. 

Wednesday night is "feeding time" for mature believers, 
for spiritual growth and challenge. Once someone has ac- 
cepted Jesus Christ as his or her Savior, and has been attending 
the weekend services for some time, they are encouraged to 
become involved in a worship, praise, teaching service de- 
signed to provide corporate worship as well as expository 
teaching to mature the believer. 

Believers are also encouraged to participate in small 
group Bible study. Small group involvement provides fellow- 
ship, accountability, discipleship, encouragement and sup- 
port. A group consists of 1 0- 1 2 people who meet regularly in 
someone's home for a predetermined period of time and study 
a curriculum designed by the church leadership. Currently, 16 
small group Bible studies meet weekly, encompassing 40% of 
the congregation. 

Playing in Rough Weather 

Putting together the game plan and building the seeker- 
targeted 'field of dreams' did not come without its "rain outs". 
The leadership had to own this concept. "Being seeker-tar- 
geted is not changing your music or adding drums. You're 

continued on page 18 



September 1994 



SPORTS 



ON THE DISABLED LIST 

How To Cope With Injuries In Sports And Life 
By David Egner 



A couple of times a week, the 
sports pages carry a team-by- 
team injury report. Fringe play- 
ers, regulars, and perennial All-Stars ap- 
pear equally on that list. For some ath- 
letes, the injury may represent a tempo- 
rary setback on a well-established career. 
For a talented rookie, the injury may 
erase a golden opportunity to display his 
skills at the top level. Or it may spell the 
end of a remarkable career. No one likes 
to be on the DL. 

What can we do when injury or 
illness strikes? How can we cope with 
being on the sidelines of life? These 
perspectives from the Bible will help: 

1. Ifs a part of life: ACCEPT IT! 

Let's face it. When you're involved in 
any kind of movement activity, 
someone's bound to get hurt. And when 
you live in a world filled with physical 
trouble, many of us are going to be af- 
fected. Pro golfer Heather Fair's losing 
battle with cancer was tragic, but it's not 
rare. Injury and illness and accidents are 
a part of life. 

A verse in the Bible says that God 
"causes His sun to rise on the evil and the 
good, and sends His rain on the righteous 
and the unrighteous" (Matthew 5:45). In 
the same way, heart disease, bad backs, 
and broken legs afflict athlete and 
nonathlete alike. When we recognize that 
injury and illness are part of life, we will 
be better able to accept them when they 
strike. 

2. Ifs an opportunity: USE IT! 

If you are sidelined with an injury, you 
can't pile up any rebounding or assist 
statistics. You can't go to work, go to 
class, or increase your sales yield. So the 
time is wasted, right? 

Wrong ! Generally speaking, we can 
all help ourselves along if we take advan- 
tage of the time we're "out of the lineup." 
It's a great opportunity to get a firm grasp 
on our goals and purposes in life and to 
do some serious reflecting. 



The Bible tells us to "rejoice with 
those who rejoice" (Romans 1 2: 15), and 
what better way to do that than to offer 
encouragement and insight from the side- 
lines. The same verse tells us to "weep 
with those who weep." That applies to 
losses or injuries. 

3. Ifs a setback: OVERCOME IT! 

Pro golfer Paul Azinger has been off the 
tour, battling cancer. "Azinger" was at 
the top of his game when the disease 
struck, and he's been among the game's 
top money winners every year. Is he 
disappointed? Yes. Frustrated? Undoubt- 
edly. Has he become bitter about it and 
started to give up? Absolutely not! He 
continues to take the treatments and to 
do all he can for a quick recovery. His 
faith in God will have him back on the 
circuit as soon as possible. It's a setback, 
but Paul will overcome it. 

It's hard for any of us to have a 
positive attitude toward an injury or ill- 
ness. Yet according to Romans 5:3-4 
and James 1:2-4, we are to view adver- 
sity as a cause for rejoicing because of 
the personal benefits it can bring us. If 
we face it squarely, we will develop a 
strength of virtue and character that is 
even more important than physical 
strength. 

Whenever I think about overcom- 
ing illness, I remember a story I read 
about Michele Leary. I don't know a lot 
about her, but I know this: She suffered 
a heart attack during her days as a star 
member of the University of Massachu- 
setts swim team. The doctors told her not 
to swim competitively for 6 months. A 
setback? Certainly. But Michele over- 
came it! This determined UMass athlete 
led her team to a championship victory 
one day after the 6 months were up! 

4. Ifs the voice of God: HEAR IT! 

Sometimes God permits an illness or 
injury because He has a message to get 
across to us. In an interview with Sports 
Spectrum (April 1994), Paul Molitor - 




Paul Molitor, who was on the disabled 
list 11 times while with Milwaukee, 
seems to have conquered the injury bug 
for now as a Blue Jay. 



World Series MVP for the Toronto Blue 
Jays - indicated that injuries in his early 
years in the majors, along with some 
other factors, were used by God to get 
him to "straighten his path and walk right 
with the Lord." 

The apostle Paul (the Bible one, not 
the Blue Jay one), after undergoing hard- 
ship that threatened his life, said, "This 
happened that we might not rely on our- 
selves but on God" (2 Corinthians 9:1). 
God is in charge of all things. The Bible 
says we cannot do anything without Him. 
He may permit an injury or illness so that 
we will acknowledge our dependence on 
Him. 

If you're on the DL, it could be that 
God has something to say to you. If so, 
hear it. Behind all the frustration andpain 
is this promise: "In all things God works 
for the good of those who love Him who 
have been called according to His pur- 
pose" (Romans 8:28). 

No one likes to go on the injury list. 
But it's part of life. It's up to you to use 
it to grow in faith and courage, and to 
make sure you don' t miss what God may 
be saying to you. With an attitude like 
that, you may get the Comeback Person 
of the Year Award. 



Reprinted by permit 
Sports Spectn. 



cHEfyLD 



r 



OH, NO! I'm Out Of Gas! 

by Terry Daniels, Pastor Grace Brethren Church, South Pasadena, California 



Just the other day I did it again. Of course there 
was a good reason. A medical emergency had 
kept me from getting to the bank on Friday 
night, so I didn't have much money in my pocket. 
I didn't want to go to the gas station for a dollar's worth 
and then have to go back right away. I thought that I 
could make a pastoral visit, swing by the bank and get to 
the station before I ran out. I was wrong. 

So there I sat, with the front end of my car half way 
out into the oncoming traffic, and three frustrated strang- 
ers trapped behind me. Things were tense for a few 
moments. Finally two of the vehicles behind me squeezed 
by and the third kind lady backed up so that I could push 
the car into an empty space at the curb. Then it was, find 
a phone and send out a distress signal. Fortunately I was 
able to reach Betty at the office and in another forty-five 
minutes I was on my way to the bank and the gas station. 
I say that I did it again, since I ran out of gas just last 
month. That time there was also a good reason. It was a 
busy Wednesday night. Ryan had a baseball game. I 
wanted to try to make it to the game, get home and have 
something to eat before rushing back to the church to 
lead Prayer Meeting. I knew that the car needed gas. I 
even drove past our station, but didn't stop because it 
was time for the game to begin and I thought that I would 
have enough. I was wrong. That time Mike Bell rescued 
me. 

I think that I am now qualified to make some 
observations about running out of gas: 

1 . Very few people do it on long trips. When we are 
out on the open highway we watch the gauge carefully 
and make stopping a priority. We notice the sign that 
says, "Last gas for 150 miles". When we stop, we fill the 
tank all the way to the top. Having enough gas is a high 
priority. 

2. It is on the short runs that we get careless. We will 
run on vapors in familiar territory. We assume that we 
can always swing into a station when we need it. We 
think, "A few more blocks won't take that much." But 



there is an undeniable law of the road whether it be local 
or long distance. If the tank is not refilled, it runs dry. 

I think that this law applies to spiritual gas tanks as 
well. They have to be refilled at regular intervals if our 
motor is to keep humming along. Anyone who just 
assumes that he has an endless supply is going to be 
caught blocking traffic some day. Our spiritual tanks are 
very much like the ones in our cars. They just hold the 
fuel. They do not produce it. It has to be put in from 
another source. 

The two kinds of tanks are filled in slightly different 
ways. In this day of self service stations, most of us 
know how to handle the hose on a gas pump: perhaps we 
have not thought about what it takes to fill our spiritual 
tanks. They are replenished by the basic spiritual disci- 
plines. They are refilled by prayer, Bible study and 
meditation, worship, fellowship and spiritual service. A 
good church is a kind of spiritual filling station. But all 
spiritual refilling does not have to happen there. Some 
of the work can be done in a closet or under a shade tree 
in your back yard. 

I think that there are other similarities between our 
automobile and spiritual tanks. People are most likely to 
get spiritually careless on short runs. "I will skip devo- 
tions today because I'm just too busy. I'll make it up 
when things quiet down." "We may miss church this 
week, but it will be there next week." The tragedies of 
life are like our long car trips. We have enough sense to 
tend the tanks at these times. The Bibles come back out. 
Prayer and church attendance slip back in. We make a 
definite effort to top them off before it is too late. 

As Betty was rescuing me from my latest dry tank, 
she reminded me of a time honored driving practice 
which would have prevented my problem. She said that 
she always drives on the top half of the tank. She was 
about ready to stop by the station since her gauge was 
reading half full. Drive in the top half of the tank. I may 
not practice that with my old car, but I strongly recom- 
mend it for your spiritual tank. 



September 1994 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



National WMC 
President's Address 

July 1994 - Grenelefe Resort, Florida 




When boarding a plane what are your thoughts as you 
walk through the First Class section and take your seat in 
Economy Class? I wonder, sometimes, whether I'd feel 
more prestigious if I'd settle in a First Class seat and enjoy 
the extra luxury. 

Greater even than First Class, the term WORLD- 
CLASS has invaded the media and advertisements. We 
hear and read of WORLD-CLASS airlines, cities, hotels, 
athletes, musicians, etc. 

Our world has become a "global village" of jet travel 
and international networks. Multi-national corporations 
are competitive in a global market. It might be interesting 
to see, in a given length of time, how often you hear or read 
"WORLD-CLASS !" Our world shrinks-does that increase 
or decrease our responsibility? 

What is a WORLD-CLASS Christian? Is it a Christian 
with a lavish lifestyle? A Christian with prestige and 
position? Paul Barthwick, author of our WMC study book 
this year, says "A WORLD-CLASS Christian is one whose 
lifestyle and obedience are compatible with what God is 
doing and wants to be doing in the world. 

The Christian arena has also been flooded by these 
global terms- "World Day of Prayer", "world-class 
prayers", "world-class missions", "world-class conven- 
tions", and our own "Charis-International Alliance Confer- 
ence" at the chateau in France in October. Grace Brethren 
Foreign Missions states, "Internationalizing missions is 
crucial to our Fellowship's continued impact in the world." 

As WMC women, as Grace Brethren women, as fol- 
lowers of Jesus Christ, we should be striving for WORLD- 
CLASS excellence-first in our own lifestyle and then in our 
WMC, in our local church, and in world-wide involvement. 

WMC has been global from its beginning. It has 
always been international, relevant as a worldwide out- 
reach engaged in world evangelism. Dr. Florence Gribble 
was our WORLD-CLASS pioneer in Africa. Her lifestyle 
was simple and luxuries were almost nonexistent. Compare 
the world she and their daughter, Marguerite, had in 
Marguerite's childhood years with the jet travel of today. 
You'll enjoy sharing Marguerite Dunning's memories and 
challenges in her book, "Live in God's Kindness" which is 
one of our suggested reading books this year. 

We might ask what is our perception of missions. Is it 
only overseas or is it also our next door neighbor? Is it only 
the Chadians' civil turmoil and poverty struggles or also in 
inner-city fatherless. Is it only praying for Ruth Ann Cone, 
our widowed missionary or is it also praying for the unwed 
mother you may know? Is it only supporting a Navajo child 




and cutting out 
soup labels, for me 
it's also been be- 
ing the only 
grandma for three 
foster Ute Indian 
boys in my 
daughter's home. 

Last year a Transition Team was appointed to act upon 
the study and research done by the Task Force. They've 
spent a year labeled BRAINSTORMING. They realize that 
we're a diverse group of ladies in many of the Women's 
Ministries in our Churches. Ladies have specific needs, 
there are special interest groups and there are age group 
needs. They are exploring ways to link our diverse cities 
and to have the cord of MISSIONS run throughout our 
women's ministries. Now a year of EXPANSION will 
follow. In this Expansion year the West Penn District has 
been selected to become our pilot district and prepare a 
blueprint for us. We salute this district for being our 
pacesetters. Perhaps you, like me, have no need personally 
to change. But I am willing to let God use me as a channel 
to allow the changes to come to benefit my sisters in the 
Grace Brethren Fellowship, to unite Women's Ministries 
in our Churches and strengthen our WORLD-CLASS 
Missions. 

I may travel Economy Class on airlines now, but 
someday I'll be taking a WORLD-CLASS flight. My 
reservation is made and the ticket has been paid in full! 
Called the RAPTURE, it will be a WORLD-CLASS ad- 
venture! There are just a few preparations I'm still working 
on before take-off. Not all the preparations are easy. . . and 
some are "very daily". My eye surgery last fall was not in 
my plans, but my Heavenly Father is using it as a pruning 
in my life as I deal with less-than-perfect vision. Retirement 
next month for us from our 41 years of pastoral ministry is 
also a new experience and holds many emotions. These 
would fall in the personal lifestyle Mr. Barthwick men- 
tioned. And obedience would include Acts 1 :8 (the global, 
or WORLD-CLASS, commission which Jesus gave us), 
". . and ye shall be my witnesses both in Jerusalem, and in 
all Judea, and in Samaria, and to the uttermost part of the 
earth." Are you in the preparation process too? Until "take- 
off, I want to be content as a Christian, but not as a 
"contented, remain-in-my-comfort-zone-Christian"-a com- 
passionate, committed, concerned Christian; not a compla- 
cent one. That is a WORLD-CLASS Christian! That is a 
WMC WORLD-CLASS woman! 



imiftLD 



CE NATIONAL 



Ideas on Administration 
of Children's Ministries 

by Brant Leidy, Director of Christian Education at 
Martinsburg, PA, GBC 

■ RECRUITING 

Use a helpful tod, the telephone: The telephone is a better tool than your 
church bulletin to ask people to serve in children' s ministries. You will see 
more people respond to this type of request than from a general bulletin 
announcement. Better yet, use "face to face" contact. Some potential 
children' s ministry workers may also need to be personally encouraged to 
get involved by another children's worker. 

■ ENCOURAGING 

Write personal notes: Write personal notes to the children in your church 
even if you are the "administrator" or children's ministries director. 
Children love mail and you will let them know you care. Also, write 
personal thank you notes to your children's workers for no special reason 
except. to say, "Thanks!" 

■ RELATtONSHiP-BUILDING 

Interact with children: Spend time with the children and do not just 
"administrate" the ministry . Teach a class from time to time and talk to the 
children on a regular basis concerning their interests. Ask them about their 
perspective concerning your church's children's ministry. 

■ PRAYING 

Pray for children's ministries: Place you children's ministries on your 
adult prayer meeting prayer list. These ministries are important and we 
ought to pray for our children. 

• EVALUATING 

Brainstorm with a CE. board: It is helpful to assemble your Christian 
Education board for a time of sharing ministry needs and reviewing the 
church directory for possible children's ministry candidates. Others on 
your board may have a different perspective on certain individuals who 
may be excellent in children's ministry. Through the meeting, you may 
"discover" a few more children's workers whom you did not know you 
had. 

■ PROBLEM-SOLVING 

Nip problems in the bad: Listen for problems and try to solve them in the 
beginning stages so tbey don'tbecome large problems, Practice a preven- 
tative approach to children's ministry problems by listening carefully to 
your children's workers. If you sense a children's worker has a problem, 
deal with it and talk it out. 



Although not new or spectacular, these are common 
sense ideas that work! As administrators and leaders 
of children's ministries, we need to be reminded that 
people are more important than programs. Remem- 
ber, our children and children 's workers need con- 
stant encouragement! 




NATIONAL 



Other CE Ideas 

NEW VIDEOS 

Two helpful new videos are available 
from CE National for only $ 1 9.99 each. 
Both feature interesting conversations 
with Tom Julien. One is on the "Six 
Identifying Elements of a GBC" and 
the other is on "Rebaptism." 

WAITING TILL MARRIAGE 
Through the "True Love Waits" pro- 
gram, hundreds of Grace Brethren youth 
sent their names to CE National in- 
dicating a personal commitment to re- 
main sexually pure until marriage. The 
booklet, "Sex and Singles: Reasons to 
Wait," from Focus on the Family (dis- 
tributed at BNYC) is a great tool to help 
youth remain sexually pure. 

MUSIC RESOURCES 

The Al Denson three-volume CD set 

is excellent for youth Sunday Schools 
and youth groups. It contains crowd- 
breaker music, praise songs, and wor- 
ship music. The set is sold at the Herald 
Bookstore for $39.98 plus shipping. 

The "Praise and Worship" Campus 
Crusade cassettes are great for personal 
or group worship. Each cassette has 22 
songs of praise and worship that flow 
from song to song. Ron Jensen's narra- 
tion includes words to the songs, times 
of prayer, and excellent worship 
thoughts. Each of the six cassettes sells 
at the Herald Bookstore for $9.98 plus 
shipping. 

USING BIBLES 

• Always use an open Bible in a Sunday 
School class or ABF. Never "assume" 
people know the Word. Ask students to 
mark their Bibles, underline, and add 
marginal notes. Even preschool chil- 
dren should hold up Bibles when Scrip- 
ture is read even though they can't yet 
read. It shows the importance of the 
Word. 

• "Bible drills" for junior age children 
(or younger) still work. (I) Bibles up! 
(2) Give them the reference. (3) Let 
them repeat the reference. (4) Shout 
"Go!" The first child to stand and read 
the correct reference wins. 



September 1994 



EDUCATION 



WHERE IS SEMINARY EDUCATION GOING 

PART 2 OF 2 PARTS 

By Dr. David Plaster — Vice President for Academic Affairs, Grace College and Theological Seminary 



First, there have been some changes in how the 
curriculum is delivered to the seminary student The third 
year is now scheduled to take place off-campus in a ministry 
setting. Many of the practical skills needed in ministry are 
now taught right on the front lines. The materials previously 
used in the classroom are now exported to the student who 
learns while doing. In the process each student is assigned a 
selected pastoral mentor to help them deal with the issues of 
character and the pressures of ministry . The use of video tapes 
and other resources under the direction of the seminary 
faculty combined with mentoring right on the job is a far more 
effective way to impart needed ministry skills. Four times in 
the third year the student is asked to come 
back to campus for one-week modules to 
complete some of the academic work 
needed. The final week before gradua- 
tion is the capstone with final evaluation 
of the student's ministry strengths and 
weaknesses. 

Provision has also been made for 
learning that has happened outside the 
seminary. Graduates from recognized 
Bible colleges can earn Advanced Stand- 
ing credit toward their first year. A Grace College graduate 
can earn up to 30 hours of credit toward seminary while 
completing his college requirements. This shortens the three- 
year program and makes it possible to finish with fewer 
student loans. On the other end, up to 18 hours of credit can 
be earned by those who have had at least ten years of full-time 
vocational ministry experiences. Prior learning is documented 
and credit is granted based on the experience and accomplish- 
ments of those who now want to come back to seminary after 
spending time in full-time ministry. 

The Master of Divinity program has also established an 
evaluation policy. Students are involved in small groups for 
the first 60 hours of their seminary education. At the begin- 
ning of the second year of the program they are evaluated as 
to their abilities and gifts for ministry. It is far more than just 
what grades they have been getting. After completing 60 
hours, each student must apply for the third-year off-campus 
component of the program. Those who have failed to demon- 
strate the relational skills and spiritual maturity needed by the 
pastor or missionary are not allowed to proceed. They can 
choose to accept an academic degree, the Master of Arts in 
Theological Studies (MATS) or to spend time dealing with 
the issues raised and reapply for the third-year program. 

Work needs to be done to develop the seminary faculty. 
Grace Theological Seminary currently has five full-time and 
six part-time faculty involved with seminary education. We 
are challenged to develop our teaching skills to deal with this 
new generation of adult learners. 

Second, all of these changes are being made while still 




maintaining the fundamentals of a Grace Seminary edu- 
cation. The new Master of Divinity program contains 20 
hours of theological studies, both Greek and Hebrew for three 
years (12 hours each), and 14 hours of Old and New Testa- 
ment backgrounds and theology. The focus to build the bridge 
from the exegesis of the text to the sermon with its applica- 
tions to everyday life continues. So, while the delivery 
systems have changed, the basic content of a Grace education 
remains as academically strong as ever. 

Third, the future of seminary education rests in 
decentralization. Grace was recently approved by the re- 
gional accreditation agency to offer courses for credit any- 
where in the state of Indiana. This is just 
the first step in our goal to decentralize 
seminary education and make it avail- 
able in learning centers in many places. 
Such courses could enable the second- 
career student to complete the first year 
of seminary before moving to Winona 
Lake. Courses to assist churches in the 
training of lay leadership could be of- 
fered. Ultimately, our vision includes 
harnessing new technology to go be- 
yond just audio and video courses to include the interactive 
video classroom. One teacher could teach several groups of 
students in various distant locations through interactive video 
linked by satellite. Students could ask questions and respond 
to the professor almost as if they were sitting in the classroom 
in Winona Lake. 

Fourth, Grace plans to be involved in the continuing 
education of pastors. The new Doctor of Ministry program 
has grown to include over fifty students. These are full-time 
ministers who want to sharpen their ministry skills, enhance 
their theological training, and gain new ideas for their minis- 
try. Twice each year, we incorporate a special one-day 
seminar for pastors into the D.Min. seminar week. It is our 
hope to offer these one-day seminars for continuing educa- 
tion to pastors across the country. To enable us to achieve 
some of these dreams, we are currently seeking to fill a new 
position in the seminary, the Associate Vice President for 
Seminary Extension Education. 

Grace Theological Seminary needs your continued sup- 
port and prayers as together we face the future. While change 
is sometimes unsettling and misunderstood, it is also the only 
path to being more effective in preparing men and women for 
future ministry. The eternal truth of the Gospel and the 
unabated power of the Word of God remain changeless. Our 
challenge is to be faithful and unchanging in our commitment 
to the truth while being flexible and effective in applying it to 
the world in which we live. Grace Theological Seminary, 
with your help, seeks to rise to meet that challenge. 



10 



C HEI^LD 



FOR 
IHE 

K 
I 

D 
S 



There are a lot of volunteers in the Bible. 
How many of them do you know? Look up the 
Bible verses below, so that you can fill in the 
missing letters in each word. 

Fought the giant V 

(I Samuel 7:34, 51) 

Led in battle O 

(Judges 4:8, 9) 

Gave his lunch L 

(John 6:9) 

Volunteered to kill U 

Christians (Acts 9:1, 2) 

Choosen by N' . 

drinking water (Judges 7:7) 

Left his business of T _ 

collecting money (Matt. 9:9) 

Took spices to E 

the tomb (Luke 24:1) 

Gave water to camels E 

(Genesis 24:15, 19) 

Washed the feet of Jesus R 

(John 12:3) 

Said, "Here am S _ 

I, send me." (Isaiah 6:8) 

Hvrvsi amvw moiaaHM N3wo* mhrllvw 

•N3W S.NOHCIID "inVS 'CJVT 'HVHOHHCI 'fflAVQ Sa3A\SNV 



ATTENTION 
RETIRED COUPLES 

Would you like to spend the winter 
in sunny Florida? 

The Fellowship of Our Savior Grace 

Brethren Church in Orlando is 

seeking five retired couples to 

winter there with the purpose of 

doing 

Home 

mission 

church 

ministry. 

If you are 

interested 

please call Pastor 

John L. Diaz at 407-876-31 78 for 

more information. 




c HEmi> 



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September 1994 



11 



BRETHREN WRITE LETTERS TO EDITOR 



The following article appeared in New Era of Lancaster, 
PA . Two of our Grace Brethren people wrote in response 
to this article. 

Bible filled with contradictions 
- from Adam to Aaron 

Last Sunday, Jan. 30, K.J. Beiler expressed the view 
that the Bible is 100 percent the truth of God. I don't 
suppose he has noticed that the Bible contains contradic- 
tory accounts of creation; that Adam was to die on the day 
he ate of the tree of knowledge, but he lived to the age of 
930; that Aaron died in two different places; that Michal 
had no children, but later is credited with five sons. 

Has Mr. Beiler ever considered that some of the 
biblical patriarchs committed adultery, fornication, in- 
cest, lied about being married and traded their wives for 
cattle? How does he explain a merciful God who orders 
a man slain merely for picking up sticks on the Sabbath? 
(Numbers 15:35). Surely this last trivia is beneath the 
behavior of a divine being! 

In the New Testament, the geneologies of Matthew 
and Luke contradict each other and both omit genera- 
tions; Luke uses a census to bring the holy family to 
Bethlehem, while Matthew tells us they live there. (Herod 
was already dead when Quirinius ordered his census.) 
After Jesus' birth, the family fled to Egypt (Matthew), 
but Luke has them in Jerusalem. All rather interesting 
since neither Luke nor Matthew had first-hand knowl- 
edge of this. As for Matthew's star of Bethlehem, one can 
only wonder if stars (suns) wander around the heavens in 
defiance of astrophysics. The Magi (the Bible doesn't 
say three) were merely wandering magicians; certainly 
they were not Oriental kings! 

One wonders if Mr. Beiler accepts as truth (Matthew 
27:5 1 ) that graves opened and the dead walked following 
the crucifixion? Certainly Mr. Beiler would reject the 
idea that church fathers censored the Bible three times to 
remove any references to reincarnation, and obviously 
many people are unaware that Revelation was not part of 
the canon until the fifth century. Some claim that the 
author got his inspiration from ceiling cracks in a cave, 
assuming he wasn't on hallucinogenic drugs. Martin 
Luther refused to accept this work claiming it was non- 
prophetic. Is Mr. Beiler aware that the idea of the Trinity 
was not universally accepted when proclaimed about 
three centuries after Jesus' birth? 

If the Bible was authored by God to show truth, it 
should accord with natural facts, contain no errors in 
astronomy, have perfection, be clear in its meanings, 
oppose slavery, war and exploitation of either gender. 
Does Mr. Beiler think the Bible meets this standard? 

C J. Randolph 
Lancaster 



RESPONSE 

Bible criticism called 
lame speculation of 
historic facts 



Although the Bible has withstood much harsher 
criticism than the slam it received last week, I would like 
to respond to C.J. Randolph's Sunday news letter entitled 
"Bible filled with contradictions - from Adam to Aaron " 

Mr. Randolph, with a checklist of complaints, claims 
that the apparent contradictions should lead us to believe 
that the Bible falls short of any serious scholar's stan- 
dard. There is no doubt that many thoughtful Christians 
differ in opinion with regards to the 100 percent literal 
interpretation of scripture, but Mr. Randolph seeks to 
discredit the entire book with his false portrayal of 
themes and his lame speculation on historical facts. Mr. 
Randolph should have done his homework. 

He begins by stating that the Bible contains contra- 
dictory accounts of creation. Not so! The last time I 
checked, the word "contradictory"meantopposing. True, 
there are two different accounts of creation in Genesis, 
but they do not contradict. Gen. 1:1-26 is a summary 
statement and Gen. 2:4 begins to introduce what hap- 
pened to God's creation. Each compliments the other. 

Mr. Randolph is correct in saying that Adam was to 
die on the day he ate from the tree of knowledge (Gen. 
2: 17). Could it be that this may not mean literal death? 
How about spiritual death, separation from God. The 
human relationship with God was completely altered 
from that moment. 

Mr. Randolph says Michal had no children and is 
later credited with five. It is true that Michal never had 
any children (2 Samuel 6:23). Her older sister Merab, 
however, was married to Adriel of Meholah, and it was 
she who bore him five sons (2 Samuel 21:8). Hmm. No 
contradictions here. 

It may have appeared clever of Mr. Randolph to 
trace the genealogies of Matthew and Luke in the New 
Testament. I did as well. Once again, though these are 
different, they are not contradiction. Matthew begins 
with Abraham (the father of the Jewish people), while 
Luke traces the line in the reverse order and goes back to 
Adam, showing Jesus' relationship to the whole human 
race. From David on, they are also different. A very likely 
explanation, however, is that Matthew follows the line of 
Joseph (Jesus' legal father), while Luke emphasizes that 



12 



c HEF t UD 



of Mary (Jesus' blood relative). Al- 
though tracing a genealogy through 
the mother's side was unusual, so was 
the virgin birth. 

It is true that Matthew tells of the 
flight to Egypt and Luke omits it. It is 
also correct that Luke records them 
visiting Jerusalem. Is it not possible 
that this Jerusalem visit to the temple 
occurred before the flight to Egypt? 
Seeing that Bethlehem and Jerusalem 
are only five miles apart, this could 
have easily been enough time for such 
a journey. Although Luke doesn't 
mention the Egypt trip, Matthew does 
not mention Jesus in the temple as a 
young boy. Because each does not 
relate the same incidences, they give 
a more comprehensive view of Jesus' 
early life. Yet, neither negates the 
other. As far as first hand knowledge, 
do we only believe the things we see 
with our very own eyes? Although 
Luke and Matthew were not "eye wit- 
nesses" to these exact events, just the 
same, you and I did not witness the 
Civil War, but we have primary 
sources, as did they. 

I am not so naive as to say that we 
don't each read the Bible differently, 
and that disagreements do not exist 
concerning interpretations and em- 
phasis of different doctrine. But to 
deny that the Bible holds truth and 
stands up to the harshest criticism is 
shallow and foolish. This is a book 
about one who has changed the course 
of human history and united more 
than all the Mohammeds, Ceasarsand 
Alexanders combined. 

If we placed as much effort in 
following the truths and teachings 
found in the Bible, instead of fruit- 
lessly attempting to discredit its va- 
lidity, we could begin to heal many of 
the social ills from which our society 
continues to suffer. 

Tonya S. Neff 
Lancaster 



Tonya is a member of the New Holland Grace 
Brethren Church and a graduate of Messiah 
College. She works for the State of Pennsylva- 
nia as a regional coordinator for the Lancaster 
Republican representatives. 



Misleading 
conclusions 



Once again, I am fascinated by the hackles that have been raised over 
issues of Christian doctrine. In this case, "raising hell" seems the rather 
appropriate term 

C.J. Randolph's response (Feb. 6) to K.J. Beiler's assertion of hell's 
existence prompts me to write these thoughts. 

I have the utmost respect for Mr. Randolph. As a former student of his 
at Millersville University, Mr. Randolph always challenged his students to 
examine all sides of an issue and gather information from any sources that 
have bearing on the subject matter. It appears that where Judeo-Christian 
religious history and doctrine are concerned, however, Mr. Randolph does 
not employ that same standard of information gathering and analysis. 

The core of Mr. Randolph's critique rests within the higher criticism 
school of biblical analysis. Many of the alleged discrepancies in biblical 
canon pointed out by higher criticism and Mr. Randolph have been dis- 
missed by more recent biblical scholarship. There is not "cover up of error" 
here, but corrections to the misleading conclusions the school of higher 
criticism contributed to biblical scholarship. 

In other portions of his critique, Mr. Randolph takes liberties with the 
texts he cites to support his contention. Two examples will illustrate this 
point. 

First: Within the context of the story line which incorporates the death 
of Aaron, the Israelites were in the same geographic region. Since the precise 
location of Aaron's demise is not known today, it does not necessarily 
follow that the stated locations of Aaron's death in Numbers and 
Deuteronomy indicate error. The context of the story suggests otherwise. 

Second: Mr. Randolph utilizes a form of mutual exclusivity in dealing 
with the stories related to Jesus Christ' s birth and early years on earth. Even 
a literary reading of the early chapters of Matthew and Luke do not lend 
themselves to understanding the events as happening concurrently, and this 
presenting the discrepancies that Mr. Randolph cites. Instead, Matthew and 
Luke presented separate distinct events occurring during Christ's early life, 
which compliment, not contradict each other. 

In conclusion, I am always amazed when critics like Mr. Randolph use 
the depravity of humanity that the Bible takes great pains to point out as 
"evidence" of the capriciousness and injustice of an arbitrary deity. These 
critics miss the point. Those stories are evidences of the consequences of 
wrongdoing that people in the biblical storyline brought on themselves. I 
find no biblical evidence that God takes pleasure in "punishing" his creation. 
In spite of all that God has done for the benefit of humanity, people still 
choose to do wrong. The celebrations of Christmas and Easter point out why 
God sent Christ to earth as a man and to die on a cross - to give us every 
opportunity to have loving contact with the loving and just God and keep us 
away from condemning ourselves to that place known as hell. 

Brian G. Ressler 
Lancaster 

Brian is a member of Southern Lancaster Grace Brethren Church and a 1983 graduate of 
Millersville Unh'ersity majoring in American History. He is 32, married and has a one year old 
daughter, Kendra. 



July/August 1994 



13 



Why all the fuss over outcome-based education? Here's why. 

Politically correct values replace 3 R's 

■ By Connie Zhu 



In 1983 the National Commission on Excellence in 
Education published A Nation at Risk, alerting the public to 
America's decline in academic performance. A flurry of 
educational reforms, designed to tighten failing standards 
of student performance, emerged-some of them poorly 
researched and inadequately tested. 

One of the most problematic of those reforms was the 
Outcome-Based Education model developed by William 
Spady, director of the International Center on Outcome- 
Based Restructuring. 

OBE is the offspring of the educational establishment 
elite, but critics contend that the untested experiment will 
actually result in the "dumbing down" of academic stan- 
dards, the loss of qualified educators, and diminished 
parental control over the development of their children. 

Also known as mastery learning, performance-based 
education, core curriculum, value-added testing, quality 
performance standards, re-learning, or restructuring, OBE 
is simply a system in which the desired outcomes of 
education are specified, and then students are tested peri- 
odically to determine if they are making adequate progress. 

On paper OBE sounds and looks good, since most 
parents and teachers want students to achieve a certain set 
of academic standards. But the problem with the Spady 
model, now being proposed in some state legislatures, is 
that many of these outcomes are tied to non-academic 
feelings, emotions, and personal evaluations. 

"Outcome-based education is a drastic move away 
from the traditional type of education based on the three R' s 
of Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. It's a move to score 
children's feelings, beliefs, and attitudes," said Carolyn 
Steinke, director of the Desert City, California, chapter of 
Eagle Forum. 

Steinke, who also serves on the board of Desert Sands 
Unified School District in Indio, California, has done 
extensive research over the last three years on the dangers 
of OBE. She and other OBE opponents believe that this 
system is not only a break with traditional education, but is 
a move by liberal educators toward the production of the 
politically correct global child. 

According to the Report, a conservative multi-media 
resource center, the Department of Education and the 
National Education Association have banded together with 
liberal think tanks such as the Far West Regional Labora- 
tory in California to promote OBE, and to oppose any 
efforts by parents or other citizens to spoil their educational 
goals. 

Marguerite "Peg" Luksik, chairman of the Pennsylva- 
nia Parents' Commission, has fought hard against the 
implementation of OBE in her state, where the House of 
Representatives voted 148 to 5 1 last summer to prohibit the 
state Education Department from introducing mandated 
outcomes statewide. 



On paper OBE sounds and looks 
good... But the problem. ..is that 
many of these outcomes are tied to 
non-academic feelings, emotions 
and personal evaluations. 

"It's the biggest issue they've ever had, that they 
literally don't know what to do with it," said Luksik, 
"We're literally had representatives stand on the floor of the 
House and say, 'Can we please defeat this, so my office can 
do something other than Outcome-Based Education?' 

"So it's a huge issue. That revolution has now spread 
throughout the country. So now this is a tremendously 
controversial issue everywhere and parents are learning it," 
continued Luksik. 

Experiments with OBE restructuring programs are 
presently going on in various school districts throughout 
over 40 states, according to a Special Report prepared by 
the National Center for Home Education, based in Virginia. 
So far no states have yet implemented OBE as a statewide 
mandated program. 

The major states now experimenting with OBE in- 
clude Pennsylvania, Minnesota, New York, California, 
Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Iowa, Hawaii, Colorado, and 
Washington. Other states where OBE will be considered in 
state legislatures soon include Alabama, Oregon, and Ohio. 

One major victory in 1993 occurred in Virginia, where 
Republican gubernatorial candidate George Allen cam- 
paigned against the push by state education officials to 
bring in OBE. Public sentiment forced Gov. Doug Wilder 
to cancel the OBE scheme in a futile effort to salvage the 
Democratic ticket. 

Outcome-Based Education mandates that each child 
demonstrate state-approved outcomes to state standards 
before the child can be promoted or graduate. These are all- 
encompassing, rather than strictly academic, and are re- 
lated to family life, personal development, environmental 
issues, citizenship and self-esteem - outcomes currently 
controlled by parents rather than the state. The time it takes 
to reach these goals is variable-students can take as long as 
they need or want to meet the state-mandated outcomes. 

According to Luksik, the powerful NEA teachers 
union is committed to establishing OBE nationwide. One 
pro-OBE workshop centered around how to deal with 
parental opposition, including those from the "Christian 
Right." 

"The workshop leader recommended finding the most 
radical person to represent their [the parents'] side - the one 
that' s the most inarticulate, the one that makes mistakes and 
states the case wrong - give that person all the time to talk, 
because they'll turn everybody else off in the audience," 



14 



imt^LD 



noted Luksik. "And the ones that are articulate and really 
have learned it and know it - don't give them time to talk. 

"Begin your speeches by saying, 'Well, I'm a Baptist, 
Lutheran, Catholic, Methodist, Presbyterian, whatever, but 
I'm not this radical.'" 

The goal of OBE is simple: "We expect a new kind of 
student who is not passive and mindlessly obedient, who 
questions authority, who requires, even demands justifi- 
able reasons for completing a given task. . . . Teachers and 
parents will need to serve as mentors, guides and coaches 
in the process of negotiating win-win agreements when 
students are buying into an increasingly challenging learn- 
ing goal." 

But so far the "learning goals" presented by OBE have 
been anything but challenging. In fact, there's a de-empha- 
sis on academics. Unlike traditional education where 80% 
was a C, 80% is now considered an A, or what's known as 
"mastery level" in OBE. 

According to Steinke, every study done shows that the 
lowering of academic standards has been a major failure of 
OBE. In Chicago, for example, where OBE was used for 10 
years, the students tested out at the 25th percentile, and in 
five schools scored in the 5th percentile. 

In 1987 San Marco High School in Texas was selected 
as one of the top high schools in the state, ranking 29th out 
of more than 1,100 schools. Desiring to make a good thing 
better, San Marco implemented an OBE program in 1990. 
Two years later, the number of 1 lth-graders able to pass all 
sections on a standardized test dropped from 50% to 36%, 
even though the state average had gone up. 

"After an intensive six-week study of the OBE litera- 
ture, we believe it to be a plausible hypothesis that certain 
aspects of this theory actually generate the negatives you' ve 
seen," Joanne Carson, a professor at the University of 
Texas, testified to the Texas state board of education. 

OBE was also the subject of a 1987 Mastery Learning 
Reconsidered study by Johns Hopkin University, funded 
by the U.S. Department of Education. 

"If some students take much longer than others to learn 
a particular objective, then one of two things must happen. 
Either corrective instruction must be given outside of 
regular class time, or students who achieve mastery early 
will have to waste considerable amounts of time waiting for 
their classmates to catch up. There is essentially no evi- 
dence to support the effectiveness of group-based mastery 
learning on stardardized achievement measures," stated 
Robert Slavin, director of the study. 

Traditionally, students had a certain amount of time, 
such as a semester, to complete academic work, for which 
credit was awarded along with a grade based on the level of 
achievement. These earned credits were then applied to- 
ward graduation. But there are no deadlines for assign- 
ments under the typical OBE model. Tests can be retaken 
as often as students desire without penalty. 

'The kids have got the system figured out. Whenever 
there's a football game or favorite show on TV the night 
before a test, the kids say 'Why study? I'll just take this test 
and fail it. I can always take the retest later, they can't fail 
me, so who cares,'" remarked Cheri Yecke, a former 



Minnesota teacher with extensive knowledge about OBE. 

Yecke cited South Washington County, Minnesota, in 
January of 1992, as having 1 5,000 incompletes reported for 
5,000 students in grades 7-12 who participated in an OBE 
program. The incomplete grades did not count in the 
student's grade point average. It was possible to take six 
classes, get an A in physical education, take five incompletes, 
and end up with a 4.0 GPA. 

There are also problems when co-operative learning 
replaces individual competition. In one Minnesota school 
district this has resulted in violence. 

"The freeloading group members, who were tired of 
being coerced into having to work, reacted with violence. 
The overworked group members reacted with violence," 
reported Yecke. "And there have been fistfights and verbal 
threats related to cooperative learning, both on and off the 
school grounds." 

Teachers and students both suffer in trying to imple- 
ment OBE, and some of the most competent, dedicated, and 
experienced teachers are leaving. 

Luksik says this loss is permanent. Even if OBE is 
completely ousted within the next five years, the public 
schools have still lost their best educators. 

Another drawback to OBE is its enormous cost, which 
must be financed by the taxpayers. For OBE to work, there 
must be a way of remediating and documenting, which 
requires computerization. Steinke estimates that a school 
can easily spend $750,000 in three years in order to do the 
necessary restructuring. 

One example of the expense is the Kentucky Depart- 
ment of Education, which received an initial $19.5 million 
from the state legislature to pay for assessing children in 
OBE programs. A short time later they requested and 
received an additional $10 million. After a month, the 
Department of Education said they really needed $80 
million. 

There is also a danger involved with these computer- 
ized student data banks, because they contain more than 
just academic information. According to U.S. Department 
of Labor reports, OBE student data banks include medical 
records, insurance status, Department of Motor Vehicles 
records, personal records, and other evaluations on integ- 
rity, honesty, ethics and self-esteem. With this type of 
information, Steinke said, it is easier to achieve the goal of 
politically correct students. 

Luksik believes that this is one issue that will impact 
every child, even if school choice initiatives are passed. 
"Parents may think they won because they have the right to 
move their child from location to location, but if the state 
can mandate that every location must inculcate the same 
poison, just picking your poison delivery system-that's not 
victory, that's defeat," she said. 

In one of Luksik' s national debates, her opponent 
asked her, "Don' t you want students to learn in a democracy 
instead of totalitarianism? And I said no. I want schools to 
teach that democracy is better than totalitarianism. Once I 
mandate that a child believe it, I have totalitarianism." 

Reprinted from Christian American 



September 1994 



15 



HERALD NEWSLINE 



Herald Newsline 



Sunday, June 12, at Waldorf, Maryland, six pelple 
followed the Lord and were baptized. That same week 23 
people accepted the Lord through the church 's various 
ministries. 

"Be encouraged with the good things that are happen- 
ing in France today," reports Larry DeArmey, Europe 
Regional Coordinator. "Today, we see a group of congre- 
gations that stands united in its resolve to reach France for 
Christ. Without exception, all the missionaries I talk with 
are encouraged with the renewal that is taking place and 
with the spirit of anticipation that they observe on the part 
of our French Brethren." 

"The Adrian Shaw concert was a big hit, and God 
worked in a wonderful way, " writes Cecil O 'Dell from 
Japan. "A total of 325 people attended with two salvation 
decisions and 39 people indicating a desire to study the 
Bible with a pastor. Thanks for your prayers. Wehopetodo 
this again next year. " 

Tom Inman, Pastor of the Colorado Springs Grace 
Brethren Church, will retire on August 14. He will be 70 
years old on August 3. His pastoral ministry of 41 years 
includes 17 years at Denver and 24 at Colorado Springs. 

The church will be hosting a retirement celebration on 
August 14. There will be a "Concert of Memories" during 
the Sunday school hour in which they wil be hearing from 
musicians from the past. Geneva will share "Under the 
Parsonage Roof - reminiscing with their four grown 
children. There will be a dinner after the service. 

Gary and Jean Austin have been called to fill the pulpit. 
At the close of the retirement occasion the helm will be 
turned over to them publicly. The Inmans will remain in 
their home, however and will be traveling for four months 
to visit their children in Indiana and Tennessee, and a 
wedding in Seattle, to be home in time for Christmas. 

Thursday, October 6, is the date for the Presidential 
Inauguration in honor of Dr. RonManahan. The Inaugural 
speaker will be Marilyn Tucker Quayle. Marilyn Quayle, 
wife of former Vice President Dan Quayle, is a lawyer, an 
author, the mother of three teenagers, a member of the 
Board of Directors ofBiomet, Inc. , and a leading advocate 
for a variety of public service programs, including breast 
cancer awareness and disaster response and prepared- 
ness. 

The two sons of Richard and Nancy Placeway along 
with the congregation of the Parkersburg Grace Brethren 
Church of Parkersburg, WV, honored the Placeways Sun- 
day evening, July 26th, with a reception in honor of their 
40th wedding anniversary. 



During the course of the festivities, they presented 
them with a winter vacation trip to Bermuda. 

Missionary Dan Ramsey was also present and took 
part in the activities while he ministered at the church 
reporting on the work of the Lord in Leonberg, Germany. 

Tom Julien, executive director of Grace Brethren 
Foreign Missions had heart bypass surgery Wednesday, 
July 13th. He had a total of four bypasses at Lutheran 
Hospital in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. The doctors say his heart 
isingoodconditionforhisage. Of course, we already knew 
he had a good heart. The prognosis is good. Thank you all 
for praying. 

Bob and Lenora Williams, retired missionaries to the 
CAR, celebrated 60 years of married bliss on July 10. A 
celebration was held at the Civic Center in Peru, IN on that 
same day. 

Paul Michaels, after much ground work in Siberia, 
had their first service with 135 people attending. That was 
on July 3! We'll carry a full detailed account of this new 
church in Russia in a forthcoming issue of the Herald 
magazine. 

The 1994 National Conference of Grace Brethren 
Churches began with registration on Saturday. All business 
was completed in the only conference business session 
from 2:00-4:00 p.m. Saturday afternoon. Then Steve Green 
got us started with a special concert, sponsored by the 
Brethren Missionary Herald. 

Sunday, at the worship service, CE National presented 
the following awards: 

ABF of the Year - Victorious Singles led by Ed and 
Alice Weber, Southern Lancaster GBC, Lancaster, PA. 

CE Idea of the Year - Jump Start Cafe - Lititz, PA 
GBC. 

Educator of the Year - Linda Kline, Wooster, OH 
GBC. 

Good Samaritan Ministry of the Year Ministry to 
Water Street Rescue Mission - New Holland, PA GBC. 

Senior Medal of Ministry - Chester Hanna, Indian 
Heights GBC Kokomo, IN. 

Youth Sponsor of the Year - Rick and Becky Stiffler 
-Martinsburg, PAGBC. 

Congratulations to all of these faithful servants of 
Christ. 

An offering of $5,000 was received toward a FMS goal 
of $20,000 to provide medicine for Africa! 

Rev. Bob Fetterhoff then gave his challenging 
moderator' s address asking the people of our fellowship to 
commit to the following six goals: 

1 . To expand to 2000 churches by 2000 AD. 

2. To enlist 20,000 people in a prayer network for 
world evangelization. 



16 



C HEI^LD 



3. To enlist a team of 350 church planting missionaries. 

4. To celebrate 100,000 conversions to Jesus Christ. 

5. To establish an international partnership in reaching 
unreached people groups. 

6. To establish an international communications net- 
work for reporting progress toward these goals. 

The morning service was followed by communion. 
Then R.C. Sproul gave a tremendous message entitle " A 
Vision for God" out of Isaiah 6. 

The day concluded with a reception for Dr. Ron 
Manahan, new President of Grace Schools, a great full day 
in Haines City, Florida. 

Conference Report, Monday, July 25, 1994: 

New officers - Moderator Ed Lewis, Second Modera- 
tor Elect Steve Peters, John Mcintosh (Moderator in 1997). 
Fellowship Council members: Kenneth Koontz, Eastern; 
Scott Miles, Central; Philip Teran, Western; Robert Divine, 
Central; David Kennedy, Eastern; Bob Foote, Central. 
*Appointed to fill unexpired terms. Conference Secretary 
- Greg Howell; Conference Treasurer - Steve Popenfoose; 
Chaplaincy Endorsing Agent - Lee Jenkins succeeded by 
John Schumacher, Brethren Evangelistic Ministries Board 
Ministerial: Phil Guerena, Ed Waken, Lay; Tony DeRosa, 
Earl Dohner. 

The third day of Conference began with a breakfast for 
Grace Seminary and College alumni and friends. 

Then a number of simultaneous seminars were held 
with included R.C. Sproul with a message entitled, "Man, 
The Idol Factory." 

CE National then led in a concert of prayer, followed 
by a great luncheon with out missionaries. 

Dan Allan, Pastor of Ashland, Ohio GBC, spoke at the 
late afternoon praise gathering on "A Vision for Grace." It 
was a tremendous challenging time as Dan encouraged us 
all to realize our riches in Christ. 

Ed Lewis also reported that over 2000 young people 
and counselors will descend next week on the campus of 
Liberty University in Lynchburg, VA for BNYC. 

Conference Report for Tuesday, July 26, 1994: 

Another challenging and fun-filled day at National 
Conference in Haines City, Florida. 

Our special guests all day were Knute and Janine 
Larson, pastor of The Chapel in Akron, Ohio. 

Knute spoke at the NFGBC ministerium, where me- 
morials were read for Pastors Don Carter and Lee Myers. 

Knute then spoke in the Bible Hour on "A Vision for 
the Church in a Changing Culture." 

At lunch Knute and Janine encouraged pastors and 
their wives at a special luncheon. What an encouragement! 

In the afternoon CE National scheduled several simul- 
taneous seminars. At 5:30 p.m. Conference-goers went off 
to Cypress Gardens for a special concert with Christine 
Wyrtzen. 

I will have to say that we are all sensing that God is 



getting us ready to significantly impact our world for Jesus 
Christ! More tomorrow. 

Mr. Jeffrey Carroll, General Manager and Publisher of 
the Herald, reports the following events for Wednesday, 
July 27: 

The day began with breakfast by the Home Missions 
Eagle Commission. Breakfast was followed by simulta- 
neous sessions of the WMC, Grace Brethren ministers, and 
Grace Brethren Men. 

Dr. James Dobson's cousin, H.B. London, from Focus 
on the Family, then spoke on the topic: "A Vision for 
Revival in North America." In the message we were chal- 
lenged to commit ourselves to the renewal of our Fellow- 
ship. 

Afternoon conference seminars were held after lunch. 

At the evening praise gathering the Bob Collet Award 
for Evangelism was presented by BEM to Miss Linda 
Kline, a Sunday school teacher from Wooster, Ohio. 

Pastor Jim Custer spoke at the praise gathering on: "A 
Vision for Unity." All present were challenged by his tears 
and testimony and many Brethren gained an increased 
vision for our role in the Body of Christ. 

The meeting closed in prayer, and Reverend Carroll 
adds, "A great sense of love and unity was felt as the day 
concluded." 

An added note of interest to those who have been 
praying for Mrs. Geneva Inman. Mrs. Inman, who had to be 
treated for heart related problems just prior to conference, 
was able to be in Florida for the conclusion of WMC Board 
meetings and enjoyed attending the conference also. She 
reports she is doing well. 

Tom Julien, conspiciously absent from conference this 
year because of recent heart related surgery, is recuperating 
at home near Winona Lake, EN. He is gaining strength day 
by day and is grateful for the prayers and cards of many and 
praises God for His healing hand upon his life. 

July 28, concluding day of Conference began with 
simultaneous sessions of WMC, Grace Brethren Ministers, 
and Grace Brethren Men. 

Then at the Conference Bible Hour Ed Lewis, 1995 
Moderator, gave us a vision for the world. We were chal- 
lenged to "Cross the Boundary" as we gather for conference 
in San Diego, California next summer. This looks like 
anther great conference for pastors and their people as well. 
Plans call for construction of a new church building in Ti- 
juana, Mexico. 

That final afternoon was filled with challenging semi- 
nars and followed by a great time of testimony with Greg 
Buchanan at the harp. The guest speaker was Bill Bright, 
Campus Crusade for Christ founder, who spoke on "A 
Vision for the Lost." 

All of the Conference speakers were interviewed by 
the Herald magazine and you can look forward to some 
tremendous interviews throughout the coming year. 



September 1994 



17 



FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



Fellowship News 

A Ground-breaking Service was held at 
3:00 p.m., Sunday, May 1, by the Grace 
Brethren Church of Millersburg. The Church 
property is located South of SR 39 on TR 305 
2/10 of a mile from the Millersburg Fire 
Department. 

"Although it seems to have been a long 
time in coming", said Grace's Pastor, Charles 
Thornton, "we believe God's time is now for 
us to begin construction of these much needed 
facilities. The first phase of construction will 
provide space for approximately 140, while 
the completed building is designed for 300." 

"Ken Schafer is serving as our Contrac- 




ADDRESS CHANGES: 

James Sollenberger 

14860 Hollowell Church Road 

Waynesboro, PA 17268 

Greg Shipley 

Willow Cottage 

Banbury Road 

Bishops Tachbrook 

Warwickshire CV33 9QL ENGLAND 

(Telephone 01 1-44-926-651576) 

Pastor Harold Combs 
9236 Kipton Drive 
Franklin, OH 45005 
(Telephone 513-746-0998) 



CHURCH CLOSES 
delete from list in annual 

Mifflin Grace Brethren Church 
1149 Co. Rd. 30A 
Ashland, OH 44805 

DEATH NOTICES: 

Ada Alice Powell, 88, of the Grace Brethren Church 
of Camden, Ohio passed away on April 24, 1994. 
Funeral service officiated by Rev. Elgin Green. 

Elizabeth Loose, of the Martinsburg, PA Grace 
Brethren Church passed away on June 14. A life long 
member of the Grace Brethren Fellowship, she passed 
away four hours short of her 105th birthday. She was 
thought to be the oldest member in the Grace Brethren 
Fellowship. 




Presentation of the building plans to builder 
Ken Schafer by Pastor Charles Thornton. 



tor," he went on to say 
"although we are 
planning to contribute 
a considerable 
amount of volunteer 
labor by our own 
people. A group of 
men from a church in 
New Jersey is plan- 
ning to donate a 
week's time to assist 
us also." 

The speaker for 
the occasion was the 
Rev. George Johnson, 

recently retired missionary to Brazil for over thirty years. Mr. Johnson 
was instrumental in the establishment of the Grace Brethren Church in 
1986-87 when he was on Home Ministries from Brazil. He is from the 
Wooster Grace Brethren Church, which is also the "Mother" Church 
of the Millersburg group. 

Also involved in the Service were the Rev. Douglas Jensen, 
Moderator of the Northeast Ohio Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches, and Pastor Robert Fetterhoff, Vice Chairman of the Grace 
Brethren Home Missions Council, under whose auspices the Church 
was begun. 

Pastor Charles Thronton has led the Church since the Summer of 
1987. 

The Property was purchased from Miss Margaret Uhl of Norton, 
Ohio in May, 1989. 

The Grace Brethren Church has been meeting in the Calvary 
Building on SR 39 between Millersburg and Berlin since November of 
1987. 



continued from 5 



reinventing the wheel and changing your program all together. We lost 
many families because of it. We learned we can't be all things to all people. 
Yet we are what God called us to be," exclaims Pastor Dave. The last two 
years has seen tremendous gro wth-almost doubling-since fully becoming 
seeker-targeted. "It's not just a concept; it's the Lord's blessing. We went 
through plenty of pain and wanted to quit. Satan fought us the whole way. 
God put us to the test to make sure we meant business. Yet He smiled on 
us as if to say 'You are faithful, you hung in there.' He has allowed us to 
see the fruits of our labor." 

Listening to Other Coaches 

The seeker-targeted concept used by Grace is heavily influenced by 
the programming of Willow Creek Community Church, led by Pastor Bill 
Hybels, in South Barrington, Illinois, and by Saddleback Valley Commu- 
nity Church in Mission Viejo, California, led by Pastor Rick Warren. 
Pastor Dave spends time 'picking the brains' of many pastors to cultivate 
ideas and resources for enhancing life at Grace. "I enjoy tremendously 
meeting with fellow pastors and attending services at other churches. We 
can glean so much from each other and share creative ideas that could 
increase the Kingdom of God" 

The game is being played, the players primed. As the seeker rounds 
third base, the One who saves is waiting at Home plate with arms opened 
wide. 



18 



imt^LD 



The Brethren Adult series for 
September, October and November 
features 



Studies In Genesis 




Rev. John P. Burke is pastor of the Grace 
Brethren Church of Waterloo, Iowa. He is 
a graduate of Fort Wayne Bible College 
and Grace Theological Seminary, he has 
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Wheaton, Illinois; Akron, Ohio; and Wa- 
terloo, Iowa. 



This study guide by Rev. John Burke is 
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The last chapter takes you through the 
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Vol. 56 No. 9 ^^^JP October 1994 



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Looking for a great book? WMC suggests: 





Marguerite Dunning 

autographing her book at 

National Conference 



French Equatorial Africa was largely unexplored in 
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area to the Gospel. Experience the thrill of those early years. 



GOD 

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How do faith and 
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1800 and her life on a 
southern plantation. 



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1-800-348-2756 



EDITORIAL 




It's 

Your 

Choice 



Jeff Carroll 



The other day I noticed a sign outside an 
insurance office that read "Sometimes I wake 
up grumpy, other days I just let her sleep!" I 
have a feeling that the insurance agent re- 
ceived more than a few complaints over that 
statement. He did, however, point out a great 
principle: We have a choice every day 
whether to be pleasant or grouchy. In fact, all 
of life is a series of choices — made every day, 
every hour, moment by moment. 

I can choose to make the most of my time 
or waste it. I can choose to sow, or forgo the 
hard work of sowing. But, if I am a farmer 
and want a harvest, I must plant. I cannot 
escape the consequence of my choices. 

All of these choices we understand within 
the framework of God's sovereignty. In fact, a 
verse I have nearly worn out is Proverbs 16:9: 
'The mind of man plans his way, but God 
directs his steps." That verse encourages us to 
dream and make all the plans that we can 
envision, relying on God to fine tune and 
change those plans as He wills and desires. 

I can choose to eat ice cream or broccoli. 
The results will be reflected on my bathroom 
scale sooner than I might like. I can choose to 
change my car's oil at regular intervals or 
neglect the proper maintenance of my engine. 
Certainly the smoke I will see billowing out of 
my exhaust system if I choose the latter, will 
be no accident. Take it from me, I know. 

I can choose to do nothing in the area of 
stewardship and personal finance or I can 
give, save, and invest my money intelligently 
to the glory of God. Did you know that $25 



invested per week compounded at fifteen 
percent interest becomes $1,216,015 after 
thirty-five years? (Many mutual funds have a 
history of more than fifteen percent per year 
over the life of the fund.) 

Did you know that the famous widow's 
mite, if it had been deposited in the First 
National Bank of Jerusalem, earning four 
percent interest, compounded semiannually, 
would today be worth slightly more than 
$4,800,000,000,000,000,000,0007 Suddenly my 
economic choices become vitally important. 

Over our lifetimes we choose to pursue an 
education, choose whether to marry, choose a 
vocation, choose where we will live. These 
decisions, along with countless seemingly 
insignificant details, all play out in our lives, 
families, businesses, and churches. Ulti- 
mately, the results of our choices even reach 
generations yet unborn. 

Someone once noted that insanity is 
choosing to do the same things over and over 
again, expecting different results. If we are not 
satisfied with where we are, we must try 
something different. 

Is it possible for all of us who call our- 
selves Grace Brethren to choose to voluntarily 
live up to our name? Is it possible to choose to 
forgive national organizations which have 
disappointed us in the past? Is it possible to 
choose to commit ourselves to an all-out effort 
to grow spiritually and numerically. Is it 
possible, as individual members, to choose to 
design opportunities to reach those who have 
not yet met the Savior? Is it possible to train 
our pastors and leaders in new ways yet to be 
developed? 

The overwhelming impression I received 
from the 1994 National Conference is that it is 
possible. A fresh sense of the Lord's presence 
was evident, urging us to make fellowship 
changing decisions. We must choose now 
whether to continue doing things the way 
we've always done them, or to take the risk 
and explore new possibilities. I am convinced 
we have no other choice. 

October 1994 



CONTENTS 



C HERALD 



Volume 56 No. 9 October 1994 


3 


EDITORIAL 
It's Your Choice 


5 


FEATURE 

Becoming a Beverly Hillbilly 


7 


INTERVIEW 

David Summer & Amy Hughes 


8 


FAITHFULNESS 
Pastor Forrest Jackson 


9 


CE 

Linda Kline 


10 


WMC 

Marie Hibaile' honored 


11 


PROMISE KEEPERS 
Follow-up 


12 


SPORTS 

Pro-golfer Paul Azinger faces 
one of the greatest experiences 
of his life 


13 


VISION 

12 Ways to Impede Church 

Growth 


15 


BNYC NEWS 



17 



NEWSLINE 



C HEI^I£> 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Managing Editor: Jenifer Wilcoxson 

Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries: Ron Thompson 

CE National: Dan McMaster 

Foreign Missions: Tom Julien, Kip Cone 

Grace Schools: Ron Manahan, Kathryn Scanland 

Home Missions: Larry Chamberlain, Jesse Deloe 

Women's Missionary Council: Mary Thompson 

Herald Newsline: 219-267-7826 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is a monthly 
publication of The Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches Brethren Missionary Herald Co. P.O. Box 
544, 1104 Kings Highway, Winona Lake, IN 46590. 
219-267-7158 FAX: 219-267-4745 

Individual Subscription Rates: 

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Extra copies of back issues: 

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Please include payment with order. Prices include 
postage. For all merchandise orders phone: Toll Free 
1-800-348-2756. All states and Puerto Rico. 

News items contained in each issue are presented 
for information and do not indicate endorsement. 

Moving? Send label on back cover with new address. 
Please allow four weeks for the change to become 
effective. 



News and Advertising Policy 

The Herald Magazine offers space for promotional mate- 
rial to the boards, churches, and members of the NFGBC. 
This includes publicizing special events, seminars, pro- 
grams, or advertising for an organization. Items that are 
news oriented will be printed at no charge. Beginning April 
1992, all purchased space will specify who paid for it. 

Standard rates for advertising: 
one full page $370 

one half page $225 

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classified ad $0.12 per word 

Color covers are additional 

For publication schedules contact Publisher Jeff Carroll, or 
Managing Editor, Jenifer Wilcoxson. 1-800-348-2756, 8-5 EST. 



FEATURE 



Becoming a Beverly Hillbilly 

by Donna Douglas 

Editor's note: The reference Dan Allan made at National 
Conference to the Ckmpetts reminded me of this article first 
printed in the October 1993 Guideposts. 



Faith is when you trust God, 

even though you can't see 

what's a-coming around the 

corner 



I stood looking around the airport in Newark, 
New Jersey, trying not to panic. It was the early 
1960s. I was a young girl just arrived from Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana, hoping for an acting career in 
New York City. I'd made a terrible mistake. 

An acquaintance had promised to meet me at 
the airport. But nobody told me that three airports 
served New York City! I'd 
originally had tickets to La 
Guardia, but at the last 
minute the ticket agent 
switched me to another 
flight. He didn't mention 
I'd be arriving at a differ- 
ent airport. 

Believe me, I was afraid. But I had been 
brought up in the church. I remembered that the 
Bible says, "Faith is the substance of things hoped 
for, the evidence of things not seen." To me, in 
plain language, that means faith is when you trust 
God, even though you can't see what's a-coming 
around the corner. 

So I said a little prayer and I sat down to wait. 
I was thankful that when I didn't show up at La 
Guardia, my friend figured out what had hap- 
pened and was able to track me down. I had never 
been so happy to see anybody in my life. I didn't 
know it at the time, but that was just one of the 
many "corners" that would be upcoming in my 
life. 

A few days later, alone in my hotel room, I 
was about out of courage. I'd come to New York 
to find work. But how did I expect to find a job in 
Manhattan? I hadn't gone to college and had 
never had an acting lesson in my life. I'd done a 
speck of modeling — in Louisiana. I could throw a 
mean curve ball (I'd even been approached about 
playing semipro softball,) and had some experi- 
ence fishing and milking cows, but these were far 



from talents that would get me hired as an actress. 
On top of that, people teased me about my south- 
ern accent. I, of course, thought they were the 
ones who talked funny. Back home in Louisiana, 
everyone had a drawl like mine. 

Fortunately, some photographers decided to 
give me a break and hired me to do ads for cata- 
logues and magazines. This 
led to a few TV commercials 
where I smiled a lot. But I 
never said a word. 

Finally I got a call to 
audition for a TV game show. 
I was shown to the office of 
the show's producer — and 
was thrown for a loop by what came next. 

"We're looking for a certain kind of girl," he 
said. "Are you willing to ah, do some extra work 
after hours?" 

Warning bells went off in my head. "What 
does that mean?" I asked. 

"Would you be willing to go out with one of 
our sponsors?" 

"Would the sponsor be married?" I asked. 
"What does it matter? You'd just be going out 
to dinner." 

"No, sir," I said emphatically, "I couldn't do 
that." 

The producer shifted in his chair. Disappoint- 
ment overwhelmed me. I'd heard there were girls 
who were willing to do anything to get work. I 
had tears in my eyes. 

"Mister," I said, standing up, "I don't want 
your job. It's not that important to me." And I 
walked out. 

I was mighty surprised when I heard I got the 
job. It turned out there'd recently been a big 
expose" of dishonest game shows, and the pro- 
ducer had to be very careful about everyone he 



October 1994 



FEATURE 



hired. He'd been trying to find a girl who 
wouldn't do anything questionable. 

Not long after that, I was asked to go to 
California to do a screen test at Paramount. The 
folks back home couldn't believe it when I told 
them I got a movie contract. But since I had little 
experience and was no 
good at bluffing, I got 
only small parts. I 
wanted to better 
myself, so I took acting 
and speech lessons 
from a coach who 
taught me to act and 
talk like anyone from a 
working girl to a 
refined lady. 

So I hoped 1 was 
ready when I went off 
to be interviewed for a 
new television series. I 
wanted this part so 
much; it seemed like 
everything I'd worked 
and prayed for. 

When I did my 
reading, the producer 
smiled and told me I 
seemed like a real 
possibility for the part. 
She said she'd get back 
to me as soon as 
possible. I couldn't 

speak; I just nodded my head up and down. I 
was so thrilled I thought my heart would pop 
wide open. 

On my way home, I was scheduled to take 
my car in for an oil change. I'd arranged for the 
mechanic at the garage to drop me off at home, 
then take my car back to service it. He was at the 
wheel and 1 was in the passenger seat as we 
waited at a red light — when a Bentley rammed us 
from behind. 

The mechanic was okay, but I ended up in the 
hospital for seventeen days. During that time, the 
producers interviewed more than five-hundred 
girls for that part. They selected six for screen 
tests — and I was one of them. It was wonderful 
news, except for the fact that I was supposed to 




show up for a screen test in three days. This was 
sure one corner I could not see around. 

"Please, God," I prayed from my hospital bed, 
"let me have a chance at this." 

Woozy but determined, I went to that screen 
test. On my way over, I couldn't help thinking of 
all the sophisticated 
actresses I was up 
against — ones who had a 
lot more experience, and 
none of whom were 
wobbly from an accident. 

At the studio, the 
producer Paul Henning 
explained the series to 
me more fully. "And for 
the screen test," he said, 
"we've got a special 
request." 

I nodded, desperately 
hoping I'd be able to 
remember my recent 
elocution lessons and 
theatrical training. 

"We'd like you to 
read the part using a 
southern accent." 

I couldn't believe it! I 
read the part in the 
down-home voice I knew 
best — my own Louisiana 
drawl. 

The producer smiled. 
"There's one more thing," he said. "Can you milk 
a goat?" 

"Sure, I can milk that goat!" I said. 
That nanny goat was the first of more than 
five hundred "critters" I worked with during the 
nine years I played Elly May Clampett on Hie 
Beverly Hillbillies. 

There have been ups and downs in my life. 
But time and again I've found it to be true that if 
you give God your best, He'll meet you where 
you are and use whatever you have to offer. 

Even when you can't seen what's a-coming 
around the corner. 

Reprinted with permission from Guideposts Magazine 
Copyright 1993 by Guideposts Associates, Inc. Carmel, 
New York, 10512. 



C HBI^W 



INTERVIEW 



Jeff talks with 
David Sommer and 
Amy Hughes 

David Summer and Amy Hughes are 
from Columbus, Ohio where they are 
both seniors at Reynoldsburg High . 

J: What was the most exciting event that hap- 
pened during Operation Barnabas? 

David: I think the power of prayer really 
showed us a lot. When at first we would have 
no kids at all at a program, we'd pray for a 
couple of minutes and we would end up with 
sixty kids and over half of them coming to know 
the Lord. It was just awesome. 

J: Amen to that. Does any church particularly 
stand out in your mind that you visited? 

David: I would probably say Okeechobee GBC 
because we had the youth rally there and I did 
my sermon and taught Sunday School all within 
one day. So, that was a big day for me. 

J: Wonderful. Has Operation Barnabas changed 
your life? 

David: Big time. Big, Big time. 

J: Keep up the good work and God bless you. 
Amy, what's been great about Operation 
Barnabas this summer? 

Amy: I think the greatest thing about OB this 
summer was how we bonded together with a 
bunch of teenagers on fire for God. I've never 
seen so many kids that are there to encourage 
you and lift you up, even when you are down. 
I know that I can do the same for others, too. 




David Sommer 



Amy Hughes 



I: What church stands out in your mind that you 
visited this summer? 

Amy: The church that I think of was Melbourne. 
As soon as I got there the people greeted us and 
asked "how can we help." It was really differ- 
ent because we were used to going out encour- 
aging others yet here they were encouraging us. 
That was really neat to experience. 

J: You're a senior this year, where do you plan 
to attend college? 

Amy: I'm planning to go to Grace College and 
major in Pre-med. 



♦ Growth is the evidence of life ♦ 



October 1994 



FAITHFUL MEN 



Pastor of the Year is 
honored for his 
faithfulness 



Faithfulness has always been a crown of 
success to the man of God and this year's honored 
Pastor of the Year is a rich example in both life 
and ministry. 

At a summer camp in August 1942, Forrest 
Jackson accepted Jesus Christ into his life. Even at 
the early age of ten, the two motivating passions 
of his life were evident: Christ and basketball. His 
pursuit of excellence in both led him to Taylor 
University where he played as a varsity center for 
four years and was voted an "All-American." 

During the height of his college career, Forrest 
was invited to be part of "Venture for Victory." 
This innovative mission was devised to bring 
together the brightest Christian athletes to sharing 
Christ through athletic competition overseas. On 
the first journey the team traveled extensively 
throughout the Orient and the following year they 
once again shared a bold witness for Christ. The 
call to full-time ministry began to motivate 
Forrest's life and upon returning home he refused 
a professional basketball contract with the Pistons 
to attend Grace Seminary. 

In the summer of 1955 Forrest married Arlene 
Smith. Arlene was a native of Washington D.C 
where she and her family attended the Grace 
Brethren Church. Their marriage was the begin- 
ning of a long and prosperous ministry partner- 
ship. 

Following graduation from seminary in 1957, 
Pastor Jackson accepted a position with the First 
Brethren Church in Dallas Center, Iowa. Under his 
leadership a rich foundation was laid for the 
church as well as for the life of a young pastor. 
After nearly six years in Iowa, the Jacksons ac- 
cepted a new challenge as Forrest became the 
pastor of the First Brethren Church in Dayton, 
Ohio. 

Assuming the pastorate in Dayton was no 
small task. The church, begun in 1882, had been 
led by many men of distinction. Pastor Jackson 
brought new vision and vitality to the church, 




Forrest Jackson Pastor of the Year 



however, and within the first five years, building 
expansion was underway. In the years that 
followed, two new daughter churches were 
planted in the Dayton area. 

The greatest challenge came with the reloca- 
tion of the church in 1983. They purchased an 
elementary school on a ten acre campus in north- 
ern Dayton. Within the first five years, a 550-seat 
worship center was added. By January 1992, the 
remaining indebtedness of the million-dollar plus 
facility was retired. 

In addition to his responsibilities as a local 
pastor, Forrest has served in many District and 
National capacities: Chairman of the District Youth 
Committee, Chairman of District Ministerium, 
and Moderator of District Conference. He also 
represented the District on the NFBC Executive 
Committee, served as Chairman of the National 
Christian Education Board from 1965 to 1972 and 
in 1973 was President of the National Fellowship 
of Brethren Ministers. In addition, he served for 
several years on the Board of Grace Schools. 

The Jackson's sons David and Bruce, and their 
daughter Melody along with their families, are all 
active in Christian ministry and leadership. How 
fitting that one of Forrest's favorite verses is III 
John 1:4 "I have no greater joy than this, to hear of 
my children walking in the truth." 



cHEIQLD 



8 



CE 



Outreach to Children 
Can Reach the Family 

By Linda Kline 

Children's Coordinator — Wooster, OH 

Outreach should be an important part of a 
church's ministry because people who will never 
step inside a church still need to be reached for 
Christ. Churches need to go where the people 
are — into their homes and communities. 

The Wooster, OH, GBC actively goes into its 
surrounding communities each June to reach 
children through NBC's — Neighborhood Bible 
Clubs, a program developed by Fran Anthony of 
the Worthington, OH, GBC. Child Evangelism's 5- 
day Club materials are also used. About 75% of 
the children that attend are not from the Wooster 
church. 

Children who make salvation decisions are 
sent the first lesson of the Mailbox Club, a corre- 
spondence course to encourage growth. The child 
receives a new lesson each time one is completed. 
The adult grading the lessons has various oppor- 
tunities to encourage the child and the child's 
family through notes, stickers, and phone calls. 

At NBC's the children fill out information 
cards. The cards of children who make decisions 
or of children who do not have a church home are 
given to the Wooster church's Evangelism Explo- 
sion leader. Each child's home is visited. The team 
presents the gospel and invites the family to 
church when possible. The goal is to let the family 
know the church cares and is available to help 
when needed. 

Follow-up on the unchurched children is also 
done through giving names to the Sunday School 
teachers of the classes they would be attending. 
The teachers are encouraged to contact the chil- 
dren and invite them. 

The children are also invited to Vacation Bible 
School which is hosted by the Wooster church 
each July. There, they get acquainted, have fun, 
and learn more about Jesus. Those who attend are 
then invited to Sunday School and Wednesday 
evening programs as the new year begins in 
September. 



The outreach opportunities for the host NBC 
homes do not end when the NBCs are over. Those 
homes become beacons in the community as 
places where people care and are interested in 
others. Throughout the year the NBC homes are 
encouraged to have Holiday Clubs and host 
weekly, after-school Good News Clubs to help the 
children grow. 

The Wooster church uses a variety of methods 
to meet children and their families. They believe 
that varied contact in a home is an effective way 
to reach an unchurched family for Christ. 

If you would like more information on these ideas 
and programs please contact the Wooster GBC at 216- 
264-9459 or call Linda Kline at 419-846-3949. 



IDEAS«IDEAS*IDEAS*IDEAS 



• Today's Baby Busters (born between 1965 and 
1983) are the least churched generation ever. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Gary Mcintosh of Talbot Seminary, 
here's what captivates them: 

Sports and fitness 

Friends and family 

Entertainment and music 

Improving the environment 

Search for serenity 
They are seeking acceptance, a sense of belonging, 
positive relationships, and purpose in life. Know- 
ing this should help us better reach them. 

• You can have a Christian Education Commit- 
tee in your church. Simply organize the Sunday 
School Superintendent with a small group of in- 
terested CE workers. Volunteers can be "paid" 
through giving them a title, a church mailbox, and 
enrichments and resources such as a magazine sub- 
scription, a trip to a CE seminar, or a visit to a larger 
and growing church. 

• Age-group Coordinators are important. Con- 
sider naming someone to oversee the following age 
groups: 

Nursery 

Preschool 

Children (grades 1-6) 

Youth 

Adults 




NATIONAL 



October 1994 



WMC 




Pastor Augustin Hibaile, his wife Marie Helene, and their children 
Sula and Jay 



Marie Helene Hibaile" is the wife 
of Pastor Augustin Hibaile^ profes- 
sor at the Brethren Biblical Seminary 
and Director of the Bible Institute in 
the Central African Republic. 

He has studied at Grace Theo- 
logical Seminary for the past two 
summers and Mane Helene and 
their two youngest children Sula 
and Jay accompanied him to 
Winona Lake this year. Their three 
older children stayed in the C.A.R. 
with their grandmother. 

At National Conference, WMC 
presented a tree of children's socks 
to Mane Helene. Each pair was 
stuffed with a check, a gift from 
WMC district groups. The socks are 
for the Hibaile" children and the 
money was used to transport books 
and other items when they returned 
to Africa October 2. 

Marie Helene completed the 
course of the James Gribble High 
School and is a member of the 
Women of the Good News, the 
African version of WMC. 



Climbing a fruit tree is an exciting 
thing. One can enjoy the fruit and cut it to 
eat. Every time we eat fruit we must thank 
God who provides it for us. 

During National Conference, a special 
tree was planted by the ladies of WMC. 
Marie Helene was allowed to climb that tree 
and cut as many of the fruit as she could. 
Marie Helene brought the basket full of fruit 
back home to Winona Lake. 

At home we discovered the contents of 
our WMC's gift, there was $1,136. We were 
exceedingly excited for the generous gift to 
our family. Yes, everyone who can see the 
fruit from that basket zvill be surprised. 

We say thanks to all those from the 
different districts of the FGBC who helped 
in planting that WMC's tree for us, and for 
honoiing Marie Helene. 

—Augustin & Marie Helene Hibaile 




cHEfyLD 



Janet Vainer, missionary to Central African Republic, Marie 
Helene Hibaile and Geneva Inman, WMC President 

10 



FOLLOW-UP 



Promise Keepers 

By Pastor Phillip Guerena 



'Men/' they continually reminded 
us, "this is all about Jesus/' 



Over 50,000 men standing side by side, 
praying for a new start in their relation- 
ships with parents, wives, children, 
churches, God. 

Tears streaking faces as fathers and sons 
hug. Marriages carried to the Lord for 
wisdom and a new commitment. Local 
churches and pastors put on the hearts of 
these men with a renewed zeal. 

Promise Keepers, 1994. 

Thousands of men carved out a week- 
end of time from their tight schedules to sit 
in Anaheim Stadium in southern Califor- 
nia. Men who wanted more of God and of 
themselves. 

Promise Keepers was founded in 1990 
by Colorado University's football coach Bill 
McCartney. This ministry is dedicated to 
uniting men through vital relationships to 
become godly influences in the world. It's 
conferences are geared to move men to 
reconciliation, discipleship, and godliness. 

Hours were invested in singing and 
worshiping. With old and new praises, 
hearts were opened to receive the message. 
Speakers concentrated on faith, integrity, 
relationships with wife and family, friends, 
church, brothers, community. 

"Men," they continually reminded us, 
"this is all about Jesus." 

It was an overwhelming testimony of 
men congregating with a holy purpose. 
One man remarked: "I have never attended 
a more holy gathering of men in my whole 
life." 

What did this do for southern Califor- 
nia? Men who attended Promise Keepers 
are now gathering together in their local 



assemblies to back up their pastors, their 
churches, and each other. 

Before Promise Keepers, interesting men 
in discipleship was difficult. Now many of 
these men have new attitudes. They are not 
only displaying a servant's heart and listening 
ears, but seem to be saying: "Here am I Lord, 
use me." 

This mountain-top experience is still 
burning alive in the hearts of the men who 
attended. One pastor said, with tears in his 
eyes, 'This is the most healing and spiritual 
experience I have ever had." 




"I HATE TO BRING THIS UF, BUT HOW DO WE KNOW 

THE WALLS OF JERICHO WON'T FALL OUTWARD?" 

See Joshua 6:20. 



11 



October 1994 



SPORTS 



One of the Greatest 
Experiences of 
My Life 

Paul Azinger was almost at the top. He had 
moved tantalizingly close to the highest echelon 
among golf's elite players. 

The former Florida State University standout 
had joined the PGA Tour in 1982 and had steadily 
made his ascent on the money list. He became the 
tour's second-leading money winner in 1987, was 
third in 1989, arid fourth inl990. 

But 1993 would be different. 

Azinger at age 33, won his first major title, the 
PGA Championship at Inverness. He finished 
second on the PGA Tour money list, earning more 
than $1.4 million. Azinger had won two other 
tournaments, bringing his career total to 11. He 
kept his 7-year-long tournament victory streak 
alive, giving him the longest such run on the Tour. 
In addition, he played a key role in the United 
States' victory in the Ryder Cup. 

Finally, Paul Azinger had climbed his way to 
the peak of success. It was the type of year every 
professional golfer dreams about. 

Until December. That final month of the year, 
a month usually full of celebration and family, 
turned ugly for Azinger. Doctors discovered that 
he had lymphoma — a form of cancer — in his right 
shoulder blade. 

"I had a jolt through my system," recalls 
Azinger. "You don't expect anyone to tell you 
when you're 33 years old that you've got cancer." 

His thoughts turned immediately to his wife, 
Toni, and daughters, 7-year-old Sarah Jean and 4- 
year-old Josie Lynn. 

But he wasn't left without hope. 

"When something like this happens, you can 
scream, 'Why me? Why me ,God?' You can run 
away or you can do an about-face and run to God 
and cling to Him for your hope," Azinger says. 

'That's what I did. I just ran to God. I realized 
I was not in control of my life. God allows things 
to happen that we don't always know or under- 
stand. But, I came to realize that if this is His call 
for me, I'm willing to accept it. 



"I think my greatest hope is in the truth of the 
Bible — and that's eternal life through Jesus Christ. 
That's where my security lies. That's where my 
hope lies." 

Within minutes of being informed he had 
cancer, Azinger went to a nearby hospital where 
he underwent a CAT scan and bone marrow tests. 
When the results finally returned they revealed 
that the lymphoma had not spread. Nonetheless, 
Azinger immediately began monthly chemo- 
therapy treatments, which would continue until 
May 1994. 

He awoke about 11 o'clock the night of his first 
chemotherapy treatment. "I just lay in bed for an 
hour knowing that I was going to get sick," 
Azinger said. The chemicals were taking their toll 
on his body. He started vomiting and did so every 
20 minutes for 9 hours. Then, three weeks later, 
Azinger awoke one morning to find clumps of 
hair on the pillow. 

Azinger made his first public appearance May 
16 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the site of the 1994 PGA 
Championship, and he declared himself cancer- 
free. 

"Those six months of chemotherapy treatment 
went pretty fast, and I thank God for that," recalls 
Azinger. "I feel as secure and content and happy 
as I've ever felt in my life throughout this cancer 
period. It's a great time to reflect on my attitude 
and where my happiness comes from. 

"I was guilty, even as a Christian, of trying to 
get my happiness from where I was on the money 
list or from winning championships. There's 
nothing anyone can accomplish in this world that 
can bring the happiness I'm feeling right now. 

"I know that when you're 33 you're not bullet- 
proof. I'm as vulnerable as the next guy. None of 
us is promised tomorrow. We need to live every 
day to the fullest." 

"If doctors told me 'Zinger, you can't play golf 
anymore,' I would be all right," he says. "This 
whole ordeal, this has been one of the greatest 
experiences of my life. I can honestly say that. One 
of the best things about it is that it's given me a 
forum to encourage and inspire a lot of people." 

Paul Azinger worked hard to get to the top of 
the golfing world, but it was his illness that taught 
him what it truly means to be a champion. 



Reprinted by permission Terry Tush, Sports Editor tor 
the Edmond Oklahoma Evening Sun. 



cHEIQLD 



12 



VISION 



Twelve Ways to 
Impede Church 
Growth 

By Bill O'Connor 



Nobody consciously wants to impede church 
growth. But a lot of folk subconsciously are happy 
to maintain the status quo. 

Many church members, without even thinking 
about it, apply strategies that appear as if they are 
specifically designed to obstruct the church's 
progress. 

Let me pose a hypothetical situation: suppose 
someone were so concerned about the growth 
taking place in his church that he wished to 
intervene. What could he do to slow or to stop it? 

Twelve strategies that a person with such 
misguided concern might employ follow. Any of 
them would have impact. All of them, working in 
concert, are guaranteed to bring growth to a 
screeching halt. 



1 • Keep the pastor in a position of subservi- 
ence; do not let him get too powerful. 

A strong pastor has a disturbing tendency to 
offer proposals and strategies that move the 
church in the direction in which he has envisioned 
it should go. A pastor who develops too much 
strength and respect as a leader just might change 
the whole character of the congregation. 

On the other hand, an upstart pastor can be 
kept in his place if a few key church members can 
maintain power. Let the pastor lead the church 
only when it is in the direction that the power 
structure wants it to go. 



2* Avoid adopting a mission statement or 
statement of purpose because everyone already 
knows what the church is about and what it 
should do. 

Tell the pastor who proposes such an exercise 
that no need for a mission statement exists. 



After all, the church has managed to get along 
without such a document. Why should it sud- 
denly need something without which it has 
survived for years? Besides, preparing such a 
statement would be time-consuming, and folks 
probably would not agree on what it should say. 



3 'Operate one day at a time. 

Why should we plan for the future, since we 
know what the church is about and why it is here? 
Have we not always managed to pay the bills, to 
keep the doors open, and to keep up with attri- 
tion? Planning is hard work, and plans often have 
to be changed. Why go to all that trouble for 
something we will just have to do over again and 
again? 

Besides, who knows what might happen next 
year or two or three years down the road? Why 
spend time thinking about things that may never 
happen? 



4* Question every suggestion that represents 
change for the congregation. 

Be sure the minute a suggestion for change is 
made that you drag out the most reliable, growth- 
impeding statement in the English language: "But 
we've never done it that way before." 

If that statement does not stop the forward 
movement, try its first cousin: "We have always 
done it that way." If that does not do the job, trot 
out cousin number two: "We tried that before and 
it did not work." 

Change is uncomfortable. Do your best to 
avoid it. 



5 • Veto every idea that will cost money or 
that is not already written into the budget "We 

cannot afford it!" is a great growth stopper. Say it 
often. Be sure to hold pastor and staff to 
preplanned expenditures. 

Church-growth possibilities often arise sud- 
denly. So be sure that expenditures of specific, 
predetermined amounts are made in writing. 

Do not view the budget as a guideline for 
growth. View it as a fixed course that the church 
must follow, and allow no exceptions. 



13 



October 1994 



VISION 



6* Stress that the pastor's responsibility is to 
make the church grow. After all, that is what you 
pay him for. 

Argue that it is up to the pastor to handle 
outreach and visitation. Be sure that he does all 
the hospital calling and that all visitor follow-up is 
left in his capable hands. 

Then complain when people fall through the 
cracks, when only a small percentage of Sunday 
visitors return, and when long-term members 
begin to drift away. 



7* Try as a church to be everything to every- 
body and to meet all of the needs of the diverse 
population in your community. 

Label as elitist any suggestion to target a 
specific audience or age group. Try to spread the 
pastoral-staff members as thinly as possible, and 
make them cover as many ministries as you can. 
They will not have enough time to make any 
specific ministry a resounding success. 



8 'Offer a good program, but maintain that 
people will beat a path to the church if they 
want what the church has to offer. 

Save money by skimping on the advertising 
budget. Nix any suggestion that attendance at 
church functions depends on members' inviting 
their neighbors and friends. 

Be certain the pastor understands that every- 
one is too busy to be involved in visitation, door- 
to-door canvassing, or telephone campaigns. Hold 
the programs, conduct the services, and expect 
those who need what you offer to attend. 



9 'Keep the leadership in the hands of 
longtime members. 

Expect new people who somehow break into 
the fellowship to wait five or six years before 
being given positions of responsibility or leader- 
ship. Make people prove themselves and their 
church loyalty before trusting them with impor- 
tant tasks. 



10* Focus on evangelism and outreach and 
exclude nurture and discipleship. Do not pay too 
much attention to people after they come to 
Christ. Just win them, and trust the Holy Spirit to 
see to their spiritual growth and development. 

That should ensure that at least half your 
converts will drop out within six months. That 
also should ensure that you will not have to 
contend with another generation that is excited 
about soul-winning. 



11 • Change pastors every three or four years 
for the sake of variety. 

Experience tends to indicate that growing 
churches have long-term pastors. Experience also 
shows that frequent pastoral change creates just 
enough ferment to negate any growth that might 
take place during the honeymoon stage of a new 
pastor's ministry. Changing pastors often enough 
surely will militate against church growth, al- 
though keeping a pastor 15-20 years will not 
guarantee it either. 



12 *Let any effort toward church growth 
dominate the congregation and its thinking. 

Assume that everything else will take care of 
itself. Be sure to focus exclusively on growth if 
you focus on it at all. 

Do not worry about the quality of worship or 
the effectiveness of Sunday School. Let the youth 
program, women's ministry, senior-citizen care, 
and other programs fend for themselves. 



Those steps will see to it that people exit the 
back door of the church at least as rapidly as new 
people enter the front door. Overly cynical, you 
ask? Perhaps. Satirical? Of course. Written tongue 
in cheek? Certainly! 

But everything I have said is true. All that is 
needed to impede or halt church growth is for 
people in the church to cling to even a few of the 
attitudes I have discusssed. 



From Growing Churches /uly, Aug,Sept, 1994 

Sunday School Board of Southern Baptist Convention © 1994 



C HEI^LD 



14 



BNYC 




/ decided to stay pure — to clean up my 
mouth and my attitude 

I was really challenged to be a leader 

I accepted the Lord this week 

I'm going to quit smoking 

I need to change my lifestyle 



My parents need to see that I 
really will obey 

I'm going to check out the words 
on some of the songs I listen to 

I want to lead the way by serving 

I recommitted my life to 
Christ this week 



I'm going to wait to 

have sex until 

marriage 



BNYC helped me 
have hope — I 
wanted to kill 
myself before 



1994 Brethren National 
Youth Conference 

Lynchburg, VA 



• Hundreds of decisions were made by youth to "Lead the Way" 
for Christ in their schools, homes, and churches. 

• Over 2000 were in attendance at sessions — our largest 
conference ever 

• 206 youths stated in writing that they believe God is leading 
them into a Christian career 

• More young people were involved in NAC than ever before — 
almost double from two years ago. 

• 1300 people participated in the community outreach BLITZ. 
BNYC was given front page newspaper coverage and extensive 
television and radio coverage. 

• 14 people in the community prayed to receive Christ as a re- 
sult of the outreach, "Operation Lynchburg," and the BLITZ. 

• As a result of the True Love Waits program, 1500 youth (from 
BNYC and local churches) committed to remain sexually pure. 

• Main session's speakers, mini-series leaders, counselors, and 
other believers challenged young people to "Lead the Way." 
•Please encourage our youth to be examples of believers in 
speech, life, love, faith, and purity (I Tim 4:12). 




I'm going to share my faith more 

* I want the courage to witness 
to my Muslim friend, even if 
it costs our friendship 

Last year at BNYC I accepted 
Christ. Tliis year I completely 
surrendered my life to His will 

I want to get into the word more 
and learn more about prayer 

I want to be a better leader 
in my church 

I decided to stay faithful 



15 



October 1994 



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cHEfyLD i6 



NEWS 



Mike and Pam Govey were commissioned at the 
Winona Lake GBC Aug. 7 for their new ministry in a 
new Home Misssions church in Land O'Lakes, Florida. 
Mike has been Pastor to Seniors at WLGBC for the last 
three years. 

Daron and Melissa Butler arrived at GB Navajo 
Mission in Counselor, NM. The Butlers hope to launch 
the first Navajo GBC off the reservation and in an 
urban community. They expect to move to the church 
planting site early this fall. 

The England Team estimates that the CE National 
TIME team shared with over 2,700 children and adults 
during their month in Solihull. They held assemblies in 
eight different schools, attended a fun fair, put on 
programs at the Solihull Carnival, and handed out 
literature in the Solihull town square. Over 100 chil- 
dren and adults heard the gospel at the team's final 
presentation at Coppice School. 

The two teams which went to Russia this summer led 
18 people to Christ and helped start a new church. 
Deanna Caudill works with some of the new believers 
and their family members. 

Paul Michaels, church planter in Novosibirsk, Western 
Siberia, writes: "Wow, you all were praying. We could 
tell because we were truly blessed through our short- 
term teams this summer. God gave us courageous 
hearts to boldly go out and share the message of 
eternal life. We have also begun a new church in which 
we have averaged 125 people in our first two services. 
But a burden weighs upon our heart. There are 15 
million people who live in our region, most of whom 
have never heard the gospel. We believe God is on the 
move to redeem many in this part of his world. We 
have entered into what we believe is the most impor- 
tant race of our life." 

Pastor Davy Troxel's father, George Troxel of Ft.Wayne, 
IN died. The funeral service was held Aug. 8. Rev. 
Keith Shearer officiated. 

New Board Members — elected to the Home Missions 
Board of Directors in the recent mail ballot were two 
new members: John Schumacher and Harry Barger. 
Mr. Barger is Development Officer for the Hagerstown 
Corps of the Salvation Army. He is a member of the 
GBC in Hagerstown. Rev. Schumacher will retire as an 
active duty Chaplain in the U.S. Army in April, next 
year after more than 30 years of service. Colonel 
Schumacher is a member of the Winona Lake GBC and 
currently serves in Ft.Lewis, Washington. 



It was a graduation program of a different sort at the 
Christian Discipleship Center in Cortez, CO in May. 
Director Richard Battis reports that five men gradu- 
ated from the ninety-day residency recovery program: 
two Navajo, two Havasuapi, and one Hispanic. An- 
other drug and alcohol recovery program began in 
Sept. This is a ministry, co-sponsored by GBNavajo 
Ministries, and Rev. Battis is a member of the GBNM 
staff. 

It has been 30 years since the Chateau of St. Albain 
became a bridge between Grace Brethren missionaries 
and French people. The anniversary celebration will be 
held Oct. 8 and 9. The week previous to the anniver- 
sary, the Chateau will be host to the Charis Interna- 
tional Alliance Conference. There will be representa- 
tives from every country which has Grace Brethren 
churches. Pray that God will use these events to 
continue to build His church worldwide. 

New Endorsing Agent — Retired Chaplain C. Lee 
Jenkins has served as the Endorsing Agent for our 
Fellowship for a number of years. His ministry has 
been characterized by thoroughness, excellence, and a 
caring spirit. Chaplain Jenkins has announced his 
desire to step down from his assignment next year. The 
Home Missions Board of Directors, under whom the 
Endorsing Agent serves, recommended that Colonel 
John Schumacher be appointed to succeed him. The 
Fellowship has made that appointment and Chaplain 
Schumacher will assume the responsibilities of Endors- 
ing Agent in late spring or early summer, 1995. 

Church planter Tim Marlier informed the Home 
Missions office a few months ago that his congregation 
in Moorpark, California, was ready to go self-support- 
ing, and depend upon the Lord's provision through the 
local congregation. Tim has used the BILD (Bible 
Institute for Leadership Development) program to 
train leaders and develop workers. They are hoping to 
establish another church in the next year or so to reach 
the Hispanic population. 

Ronald A. Smals has accepted the call of the Lord and 
will begin his pastorate of the Ocala GBC, Ocala, FL on 
the first of October. 

PRAYER IS URGENTLY requested for the past Board 
of Directors of Grace Village as the lawsuit against 
these volunteer directors went to trial in early Septem- 
ber in Warsaw, IN. Each director has already paid 
$7000 in lawyer/ court costs over the past two years 
and there is the possibility of appeals with resulting 
months or even years of continued litigation. 



17 



October 1994 



NEWS 



Tim and Julie Hawkins moved into the center of 
Porto, Portugal in August. Their building complex is 
located in the growing business section of the city. Tim 
will be targeting college-educated men who can be 
won and trained as church planters and leaders of cell 
groups. "Our goal is not just to have a large list of 
contacts," writes Tim, "we want to establish an effec- 
tive network within our target group." 

The Hope GBC in Buenos Aires, Argentina, is recruit- 
ing Word of Life Students for an internship program, 
this year-long program will train participants in church 
planting techniques. The main goal is that each intern 
starts a new GBC in southern Buenos Aires. Hope GBC 
has already planted four daughter churches. 

The Richmond GBC hosted a group of French people 
led by missionary Dave Griffith. They were part of the 
French-America Club in LeCruesot, France. "Our 
people really went out of their way to make them feel 
welcomed and to give a strong witness of Jesus Christ. 
I believe that several were touched with the Spirit of 
the Lord," says Pastor Wayne Hannah. 

James E. Swanson has been named the new Dean of 
Students for Grace College. He holds a Bachelor degree 
from William Tyndale College and Master of Arts in 
Counseling from Eastern Michigan University. Prior to 
coming to Grace, Jim was an Individual and Family 
Therapist, Professor of Psychology at William Tyndale 
College, and Director of Environmental Services at 
Servicemaster. 

If you need information on E-Mail and how to set it up, 
call us at BMH: 1-800-348-2756. We will update our E- 
Mail folder each week by Tuesday afternoon. 

Professor R. Wayne Snider was recently honored for 
forty years of service to Grace College. Prof. Snider was 
on the faculty when the very first four-year college 
courses were begun. Prof. Snider served as the first 
Dean of Men from 1954-1959 while teaching history 
and physical education. He has continued teaching 
history in the college since 1959. 



Prof. R. Wayne Snider 




ADDRESS & PHONE CHANGES 

Mark and JoAnna Berndt 
Lamacova 5 15200 
CZECH REPUBLIC 

Deanna Caudill 

Phone: (011-7) 3832-225364 

Larry and Vicki DeArmey 

100 A cours Lafayette 

69003 LYON 

FRANCE 

Phone: (011-33) 78-62-02-23 

Jim and Martha Hines 
3677 White Trillium West 
Saginaw, MI 48603 
Phone: 517-793-2068 

Jim and Faye Hocking 
340 W. Baker Street 
Warsaw, IN 46580 
Phone:219-267-3758 

Ralph and Joan Justiniano 
98-099 Uao PI. #803 
Aiea,HI 96701 
Phone: 808-487-8596 

Paul and Cindy Michaels 
D. 215 KV. 26 
Krassni Prospect 
Novosibirsk 49, RUSSIA 630049 
Phone: (011-7) 3832-261464 

Patty Morris 

c/oLeC.E.P 

85 cours de la Republique 

69100 VILLEURBANNE 

FRANCE 

Phone: (011-33) 78-85-89-50 

Bonnie Nissley 
P.O. Box A. C. 527 
Quezon City, 1109 
PHILLIPPrNES 

George and Cindy Swain 
(011-42) 02-591-421 

PASTORAL CHANGES 

Richard S.Brown is the Associate Pastor of the GBC of 
Kent, WA, as of June 1994. 

GBC of Fremont Ohio has called Robert V. Mitchell to 
be Associate Pastor, Director of Student Ministries. 

WEDDING 

Mike Yoder, Mt.Pleasant, I A (son of Dr. Vance and Marilyn 
Yoder) and Letitia Wiley of Minerva, OH (daughter of 
Pastor Galen and Elsie Wiley) were married at the GBC 
in Minerva, OH onjunell,! 994. 



cHEIQID 



18 



GRACE 



Westminster Hotel 




Remember staying in the hotel, eating in the dining room or visiting Grace College friends or family 

members who lived there in a dormitory room? Westminster Hotel, has served many functions in the 

Winona Lake area for more than 85 years. Renovations are beginning to restore her to her position as 

a beautifully functional landmark that will serve the entire community. 



In January, Grace College and Theological 
Seminary purchased the Westminster Hotel in 
Winona Lake, from the Free Methodist Church of 
North America. 

Completed in 1907, it recently received an 
Outstanding rating in the Kosciusko County 
Interim Report of Indiana Historic Sites and 
Structures Inventory. Also known as The Interna- 
tional Friendship House, it is listed in the Na- 
tional Register of Historic Places. 

"Our purchase of the Westminster Hotel 
represents our intention to grow and better serve 
the needs of our students," says Grace President 
Ronald Manahan. "The project is especially 
gratifying since we will also be able to preserve an 
important landmark while providing space for 
local church and community use." 

A study was initiated in March to review the 
usage of the building. After consultation with staff 



and faculty of Grace and community members, 
the following usage was determined: 

= Main floor will house a museum focusing on 
the history of the Westminster and Winona Lake 
Christian Assembly, several small meeting rooms, 
and two dining rooms with capacities of 150 each. 
The interior will reflect the building as it appeared 
in 1930. 

= The second and third floors will be remod- 
eled to house ninety-eight students. 

= The basement will be renovated to include a 
student union, study area, laundry facilities, 
Grace Student Organization offices, and addi- 
tional space yet to be assigned. 

Representatives from Grace College and 
Seminary will be visiting your church soon, to 
answer your questions and give you more details 
about this project and other timely and challeng- 
ing opportunities for growth. 



19 



October 1994 



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EDITORIAL 




Jeff Carroll 



The Baseball Crisis 

Over the last two years we 
have heard about the Economic 
Crisis, the Environmental Crisis, 
and the Health Care Crisis. It 
has just been one crisis after 
another. But I suggest to you 
that there really is a crisis of 
National proportions — and if 
this crisis is not solved soon, it 
may adversely affect our Ameri- 
can way of life. I'm referring to, 
of course, the Baseball Crisis. 

Do you realize that there will 
be no World Series this year? 
Oh, it's a sad day in Mudville. 
But, I have a solution. I say step 
aside Acting-Commissioner 
Selig, step aside George 
Mitchell, I nominate Hillary 
Clinton for the new Baseball 
Commissioner. Thaf s right, 
Hillary Clinton. 

We're dealing with a game, or 
should we say business, that has 
been around since 1869 and 
attracts 70 million fans each 
year. It certainly is worthy of 
Nationalization. And, I have a 
few suggestions on how she 
should get started. 

First, disband the National 
and American leagues and all 
six divisions. In their place 
establish regional team alliances. 
Then develop a strategic geo- 
graphic mapping system to 



assign followers a team for 
which to root. Remember, the 
word "fan" is a shortened 
version of "fanatic" and we 
certainly need fewer of those 
today. 

Secondly, address the ticket 
dilemma. Did you know that 
the average price of a ticket to a 
Major League Baseball game for 
1994 passed the $10 mark? 
Combine that with parking and 
concessions, and the average 
cost of talking a family of four to 
the ballpark is $115. 1 sense a 
subsidy. Who better to propose 
and implement a subsidy pro- 
gram than Hillary? We know 
that she's good at it. 

How do we pay for the 
subsidy? That takes us to step 
number three: Levy a tax on all 
hot dogs — and not just those 
consumed at the ball parks. This 
tax could conceivably include 
certain players. 

Speaking of money, step 
four — don't cap salaries, tax 
them. Any salary over $700,000 
should be subject to a 100% tax. 
Folks this is the 90s and taxing 
makes good sense. 

Fifth: appoint Marge Schott 
and George Steinbrenner as 
official spokespersons for our 
national pastime. I'm sure they 
would have much to say and the 
press would have a field day, 
thereby removing any undesir- 
able heat from Hillary. 

Well, that's my solution and I 
think it pretty well covers all the 
bases. You don't like it? By all 
means give us a better one. All I 
know is there is no baseball and 
no World Series in the United 
States of America. Doesn't 
anybody care about baseball 
card futures? 

Luke 12:15 




November 1994 



CONTENTS 



CHERQLD 



Volume 56 No. 10 



November 1994 



3 
5 
7 
8 

10 
11 

12 

13 
17 
19 



EDITORIAL 

The Baseball Crisis 

FEATURE 

The High Price of Preaching 

THE PEOPLE WE MEET 
Janine Larson 

FOCUS 

Becoming a Focus 2000 Church 

WMC 

Missionary of the Year: Sue Guiles 

CONSIDER 

When did bedtime become 

a good thing? 

GRACE 

The Unchanging Value of Service 

GOOD SPORTS 
Take Your Pick 

NEWS 



LIGHTS 

Introducing our new column: 

Lamplight Chronicles 



cHEIQLD 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 
Printer: Evangel Press 
Managing Editor: Jenifer Wilcoxson 

Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries: Ron Thompson 

CE National: Ed Lewis 

Foreign Missions: Tom Julien, Kip Cone 

Grace Schools: Ron Manahan, Kathryn Scanland 

Home Missions: Larry Chamberlain, Jesse Deloe 

Women's Missionary Council: Mary Thompson 

Herald Newsline: 219-267-7826 

The Brethren Missionary Herald is a monthly 
publication of The Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches Brethren Mssionary Herald Co. P.O. Box 
544, 1104 Kings Highway, Winona Lake, IN 46590. 
219-267-7158 FAX: 219-267-4745 

Individual Subscription Rates: 

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Extra copies of back issues: 

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Please indude payment with order. Prices indude 
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Please allow four weeks for the change to become 
effective. 



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The Herald Magazine offers space for promotional mate- 
rial to the boards, churches, and members of the NFGBC 
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FEATURE 



The High Price of PreacMrtg 

By Donald P. Shoemaker i„ A ,„ 



Twenty-five years ago I 
graduated from Grace Theologi 
cal Seminary. At long last, seven 
years of hard work, four in 
college and three in seminary, 
were over. 

But I graduated with a cloud 
over me. I was in debt. My 
seminary education was paid 
for, in part, by a denominational 
loan. I owed over one-hundred 
dollars. Not to worry, though, 
because every year I served in a 
ministry of GB churches meant 
cancellation of twenty percent of 
this astronomical debt. 

Seminary tuition, when I 
attended, was $15-$19 per 
semester unit. Ninety-six units 
plus books and fees might set a 
student back around $2,500 over 
the three years. Then tuition 
loans repaid through service 
were available. 

How times change. 

A sampling of evangelical 
seminaries showed me that a 
three-year education preparing 
for the ministry now costs 
approximately $25,000 to 
$30,000. This does not even 
address the student's lost earn- 
ing while enrolled. Slightly more 
than half of seminary students 
manage to graduate debt-free, 
but the average debt for those 
who do borrow is over $11,000. 

Now, facing the fact that the 
starting salary for this graduat- 
ing minister or missionary is 
likely to be $20,000 or less, the 
annual payment on his or her 
debt would be about $1,600— 
quite a chunk out of the monthly 
rent and grocery money. 




o wonder Anthony Ruger 
land Barbara Wheeler, in a recent 
issue of Christian Century ask 
this question: "Are we nearing a 
time when beginning ministers 
will be so heavily indebted that 
they cannot afford to work in 
the profession for which they 
were trained?" 

For the aspiring minister, 
excessive debt is not the only 
danger. A real temptation now 
exists to "trim down" the prepa- 
ration by settling for less than 
the standard three-year degree. 
This is an unfortunate curtailing 
of learning and congregations 
will pay the price. Shorter 
programs are excellent for many 
aspects of church work and 
missions, but not for senior 
pastors. 

For one-hundred years, our 
denomination has valued strong 
training for ministry. God may 
place His hand on gifted people 
without such training, but this is 
the exception and not the rule. 
We must continue to see the 
worth and necessity of prepara- 
tion and not yield to either cost 
or modern pragmatism. 

Unfortunately, the cost does 
not end with graduation. The 
new minister or missionary 
faces the expense of acquiring 
the "tools of the trade." My 
professional library contains 
over three-thousand volumes. 
The books I purchased during 
my seminary years cost an 
average of two dollars for 
paperbacks and three or four 
dollars for hardbacks. Compare 
that to ten to twenty dollars for 



Best-Selling Christian Books 



NON-FICTION— Hardback 

1. Wlien God Wliispers Your Name 
Max Lucado 

2. When God Doesn't Make Sense 
James Dobson 

3. Standing Firm 
Dan Quayle 

4. The Source of My Strength 
Charles Stanley 

5. The Seven Promises of a Promise 
Keeper Focus on the Family 

6. Quiet Times for Couples 
H. Norman Wright 

7. Angels 
Billy Graham 

8. The Book of Virtues 
William Bennett 

9. Love for a Lifetime 
James Dobson 

10. He Still Moves Stones 
Max Lucado 

FICTION 

1. Too Long a Stranger 
Janet Oke 

2. A Home for the Heart 
Michael Phillips 

3. Vie Stars for a Light 
Lynn and Gilbert Morris 

4. The Sword of Truth 
Gilbert Morris 

5. 77ns Present Darkness 
Frank Peretti 

6. Stoner's Crossing 
Judith Pella 

7. An Echo in the Darkness 
Francine Rivers 

8. The Third Millennium 
Paul D. Meier 

9. A Skeleton in God's Closet 
Paul L. Maier 

10. Prophet 
Frank Peretti 

November 1994 



FEATURE 



Since the holidays are upon us, 
filled with sweets, treats, eats 
and repeats of the same, we 
thought you might enjoy this 
"lite" version of an old favorite. 



The Dieter's 23rd Psalm 

The Lord is my shepherd, 

I shall not bulge 

He maketh me lie down and do 

push-ups. 

He giveth me cottage cheese, 
He restoreth my waistline; 
He leadeth me past the refrig- 
erator for mine own sake. 

He maketh me to partake of the 

green beans instead of the 

potatoes; 

He leadeth me past the pizza 

parlor. 

Yea, though I walk through the 

bakery, 

I shall not falter, 

for thou art with me; 

Thy artificial sweetner and diet 

colas, they comfort me. 

Thou preparest a diet for me in 
the presence of the holidays; 
Thou annointest my salad with 
low-cal oil; 
My plate will not overflow. 

Surely skim milk and yogurt 
shall follow me all the days of 
my life, 

And I will dwell in the land of 
granola forever. 




C HEI^LD 



paperbacks and fifteen to forty 
(or much more) for hardbacks 
now. A good theological 
library can run $50,000. 

At the least, a new minister 
or missionary needs $10,000 
to establish a basic working 
library. Beyond that, it is wise to 
invest in a computer system — 
perhaps another $3,000. 

So what is the church to do? 

FIRST: denominational 
ministerial bodies like the 
National Fellowship of Grace 
Brethren Ministers, in coopera- 
tion with their mission agencies, 
should establish a program to 
fund loans that cover a portion 
of tuition costs. A percentage of 
these loans can be canceled for 
each year the student serves 
after graduation. 

SECOND: churches need to 
place funding of their educa- 
tional agencies into their mis- 
sions budgets. Training for the 
ministry is as legitimate a 
service to underwrite as is 
actually doing the ministry. 

THIRD: churches need to 
provide aid to their own "sons 
and daughters" who are training 
for ministry. This can be in the 
form of grants and scholar- 
ships — sometimes eligible for 
linking with matching funds 
from the schools. 

FOURTH: churches should 
create "intern ministry" oppor- 
tunities for their ministerial and 
mission students. They can put 
their new learning and skills to 
work, gaining valuable experi- 
ence, while they benefit from 
some compensation. 

FIFTH: we must take a 
serious look at entry level 
salaries. A disparity between 
salaries for ministers and for 
comparable professions is often 




unnecessary and therefore 
unbiblical. Many 
churches are doing all 
they can, but some could 
rearrange priorities. 
Alternatively, since 
churches benefit from the 
education of the minister re- 
ceived, the church could assume 
the cost of the loan repayment. 
Though this alternative does not 
benefit the minister who did not 
incur debt. 

SIXTH: churches and agen- 
cies should absorb the cost of 
the necessary tools for these 
employees (like it or not, that's 
what they are). When the 
Apostle Paul discussed compen- 
sation, he asked: "Who at any 
time serves as a soldier at his 
own expense?" I Cor 9:7. Many 
churches and agencies would 
have to answer: "At our place 
they do!" 

FINALLY: funds and time 
should be made available to 
pastors for continuing educa- 
tion. This includes opportunities 
to take courses or seminars, 
finish a degree, or pursue a 
higher one. This is a win- win 
situation for both pastor and 
congregation. 

As with all vocations, 
pastoring and mission work 
have their burdens. Those who 
serve must be willing to accept 
some necessary burdens, but 
that does not mean we who 
benefit should not make the 
effort to help lift them. 

The cost of education is now 
a major burden and trends 
suggest, if anything, greater 
burdens for the future. Creative 
solutions will help — and please 
the Lord who desires more 
laborers in the harvest. 



INTERVIEW 



People We Meet 

Janine Larson, wife of 
Pastor Knute Larson 
The Chapel, University Park 
Akron, Ohio 



Q: Janine, whaf s the best part of 

being a pastor's wife? 

J: Being married to the pastor. 

Q: What is your biggest challenge 
as a pastor's wife? 
J: My biggest challenge is to stay 
close to the Lord. I need to con- 
stantly keep in front of me the fact 
that I am to know God better and to 
be more like Christ. That challenge 
never lessens. 

Q: How do you handle the politics 
of a local church — the people who 
disagree with your husband or 
conflicts that arise? 
J: Over the years I've developed a 
certain amount of immunity to 
some of those kinds of things. 
When I hear criticism, I try to 
imagine where he or she is coming 
from — realizing that person has a 
different perspective. I am also 
trying to learn not to share every- 
thing I hear with Knute. 

Q: Whaf s your daily schedule? 
J: Ifs different every day because of 
the size of our church. In any one 
week, we have approximately 250 
activities. I obviously can't be at all 
of those. I choose which ones to 
attend that will make me a better 
worker alongside Knute. The very 
first things that I leave time for are 
my relationship with the Lord and 
then, my duties as a wife. 

Q: How would you describe your 
main role in the church? 
J: I think my main job is to be an 
encourager of people and especially 
an encourager to Knute. I need to 
be available to him and to his 
schedule — to meets his needs. 




Q: How old 

are your 

children? 

J: Elise is 26. 

and married 

to Keith 

Bishop. They 

live in Glen 

Ellyn, 

Illinois. 

Allison is 23, 

has finished 

her bachelor 

degree and 

lives and 

works in 

Chicago. The 

girls are very 

close to each 

other and they'regood friends. 

They are close to me — we're good 

friends too. 

Q: How has your role as a mother 
changed now that they're grown? 
J: That great transition probably 
happened while they were in 
college. I went from being a parent 
to a mother. We have good times 
together on the telephone, and 
when I visit them. We're friends. 

Q: What did you do right for your 
children? 

J: I am grateful that I never had to 
work outside of our home. I prayed 
for them and I tried to model what 
it means to honor their father as my 
husband. I also tried to be in the 
Word so that they would see me 
read and pray — that made a big 
impact on them. 

Q: What did you do wrong? 

J: I didn't give them as much time 

as I would if I were doing this over. 

I would have said no to more things 

and yes to more things of my 

children. 

Q: How do you want to be remem- 
bered by your children? 
J: I would like to be remembered as 
a mother who was fun, a woman of 
joy, a woman of God. 




November 1994 



FOCUS 



—1994-95 PRAYER GOALS - 

National Fellowship 

Grace Brethren Churches 

U.S.A. 

Pray that by July, 1995... 

1. 100 churches commit to 

becoming Focus 2000 

churches. 

2. 100 churches pray for and 

hold all-church outreach 

events. 

3. Churches enlist 8,000 
people to pray for revival 
and world evangelism. 

4. 8,000 people establish a 
discipleship and account- 
ability relationship with 
another believer. 

5. Churches experience new 
converts — 4,000. 

6. 100 new satellite churches 
are begun. 

7. Cooperative plans are 
implemented targeting the 
97% unevangelized people of 
the world who inhabit the 
"10/40 window" (countries 
located in a rectangle 10° 
above the equator to 40° above 
the equator from north-east 
Africa to south-east Asia). 
8. 100 churches adopt a 
smaller church for prayer, 
encouragement, and assis- 
tance with ministries. 
9. 100 pastors each target five 
men in their churches for the 
purpose of developing spiri- 
tual leadership. 

10. 8,000 believers prayerfully 
seek to lead one person to 
Christ. 

11. 100 churches increase 
Sunday School and /or small 
group attendance by 10%. 

12. At National Conference, 
1,500 Grace Brethren pastors 
and leaders cross the bound- 
ary to touch a needy world. 



THE SEVEN ELEMENTS 
OF A FOCUS 2000 CHURCH 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 



C HH^LD 



Worship and prayer 

A diurdi that is challenged to regular prayer 



Outreach — Church and Personal 

A diurch that is diallenged to share its faith 



Church Planting Worldwide 

A diurdi tfwt establishes international 
partnerships for readiing unreadied people 



Spiritual Growth & Discipleship 

A diurdi tliat reads its Bible 
and holds itself accountable 



Fellowship and Networking 

A diurdi that purposes to meet needs 



Leadership Development 

A diurdi tlmt implements and promotes 
the use of spiritual gifts 



Vision-Casting 

A diurdi tliat communicates positive goals and vision 

These goals weave together a challenging direction to 
stimulate growth, ministry, and vision. 

— Ed Lewis, Moderator '94-'95 

8 



FOCUS 



The Year 2000— Today 

By Ed Lewis 

Moderator, 1994-95 



Grace Brethren Churches are 
known to be churches of the 
Word! We believe and teach the 
Scriptures as our final authority. 
In fact, our motto is "The Bible, 
the whole Bible, and nothing but 
the Bible." 

We are not only committed to 
learning the truth of the Word, 
but also applying the Word to 
our lives. A group of leaders met 
in 1993 and stated that Grace 
Brethren want to be "empow- 
ered churches, impacting our 
world with the love of Christ." 

If the Lord tarries His return, 
in just six years we'll be in a new 
millennium with new opportu- 
nities to impact our world. 

During 1993-94, Grace 
Brethren pastors who attended 
FOCUS II retreats shared ideas 
and dreams of what they want 
to see the Grace Brethren Fel- 
lowship become by the year 
2000. The focus of these goals 
relates to remaining strong in 
the faith and becoming even 
stronger in convictions. 

Another overwhelming 
desire is to see our churches 
reach out to our changing 
society — to have more African 
Americans, Hispanics, and 
culturally diverse congregations. 
In fact, the 1995 National Con- 
ference will encourage the 
meeting of this goal as we leave 
our comfort zones. The theme is 
"Cross the Boundary — Touch 
Your Needy World." 

There were diverse and 
intense thoughts as pastors at 




FOCUS II retreats shared their 
burden to see God use them and 
their churches to be powerful 
instruments of our Lord in 
today's decaying culture. 

As a result of their recom- 
mendations, along with sugges- 
tions from many Grace Brethren 
people, I prayerfully compiled a 
list of seven elements of an 
effective Grace Brethren Church. 
These elements, shown on the 
opposite page, parallel the 
FGBC Masterplan and follow 
the challenge by 1994 Moderator 
Bob Fetterhoff, to see our Fel- 
lowship include 2000 churches 
by the year 2000. (We currently 
have 1,250 worldwide.) 

Numerous ideas as to how 
each element can be developed 
in our Fellowship's churches 
have been compiled in a bro- 
chure titled: "Becoming a Focus 
2000 Church." It is our prayer 
goal that 100 of our U.S.A. 
churches will commit to becom- 
ing a Focus 2000 church. What a 
celebration we could experience 
as we gather in San Diego, 
California for conference next 
July to hear God's Word and 
learn what God is doing through 
answers to prayer. 

Please pray that God will 
bountifully supply as churches 
in the Grace Brethren Fellow- 
ship pursue what we believe to 
be goals honoring Him and 
furthering His kingdom. 
To obtain a copy of the Focus 2000 
brochure please write to Focus 2000, 
P.O. Box 365, WinonaLake, IN 46590. 



"My prayer is 

that 100 churches 

take the challenge 

to move ahead, 

committed to 

becoming 

Focus 2000 Churches. 



November 1994 



WMC 





/ 1 $*3 \ 





































'The world's people must be 
resuscitated from sterile num- 
bers and become living, breath- 
ing, dying human beings just 
like ourselves. 

These people march across our 
literature like so many little 
ducks in the old-time shooting 
galleries at the penny arcades. 
We even identify them as 
targets. 

Mission, in the biblical sense, 
means suffering and bleeding 
for our fellow sufferers and 
bleeders. 

It means hours, days, weeks, 
and years of loving someone, 
whether this person takes our 
tracts or not." 



— Jim Reap some 
(Pulse, June 1994) 



CHEIQLD 



1994-95 
Missionary of Year 

It was fine with me to be a 
pastor's wife — but being a 
missionary was quite another 
matter. 

I grew up on a farm in east- 
ern Pennsylvania, the youngest 
of six children. Always active in 
the church, I heard the gospel 
message but I didn't apply it to 
my own life. In 1974 my sister 
invited me along to the Myers- 
town GBC to see the movie A 
Thief in the Night. That night I 
asked Jesus to be my personal 
savior. 

After high school, I attended 
Grace College. The Lord used 
those years to strengthen my 
faith and my desire to serve 
Him. Then I met Dave Guiles. I 
was impressed by his love for 
the Lord and his desire to serve 
Him as a pastor. We were mar- 
ried January 2, 1982. 

We'd been married about a 
year and a half and Dave was 
studying at Grace Seminary 
when he shared with me his 
growing desire to serve in a 
foreign country. What a shock!— 
but I agreed to pray about it. 
Little by little the Lord began to 
give me the same desire. Now, 
after working in Argentina for 
over five years it has become 
our home. 

We live and work in Buenos 
Aires, one of the world's largest 
cities. We have four children: 
Daniel and Jonathan are nine, 
Mark is six, and Melisa almost 
two. 

Dave is heavily involved in 
the evangelism program of 
Hope Grace Brethren Church 
His responsibilities also include 

10 




Sue Guiles with her husband Dave and 

their children Daniel, Jonathan, 

Mark, and Melisa 



serving as Argentine Field 
Superintendent and as Latin 
America Area Coordinator. 

My ministries have been 
varied. Right now I am working 
with the ladies of Hope GBC. I 
am also meeting with the 
pastor's wives of the Buenos 
Aires churches, leading a 
monthly study and encourage- 
ment time. We enjoy sharing our 
lives and our home with others. 

One verse that has helped me 
is: "1 can do all things through Him 
who strengtiiens me. " Phillippians 
4:13. 1 can't do anything on my 
own, but I can do everything 
that needs to be done in Christ's 
strength. 

Please pray that I will: 

1 . Maintain a close walk with 
the Lord. 

2. Maintain the proper bal- 
ance between my family and 
ministry. 

3. impact the bves of Argen- 
tine women for Christ. 

Four women have been chosen to be honored 
as WMC Missionaries of the Year. You may 
borrow the MOY video or slide-tape from 
GBFM, Larry Hubartt, Distribution 
Coordinator, Box 588, Winona Lake, IN 
46590. Please give the desired date, indicate 
your media choice, and include a gift to 
cover expenses. 



CONSIDER 



When did bedtime become a good thing? 

By Neil Cole 

When did bedtime become a good thing? 

What ever happened to all those excuses for just five more minutes 
before we'd surrender to the sheets? 

When did a stick become just a stick rather than a shining saber? 

When did it become blasphemous to walk on top of a wall instead of 
next to it? 

Why are there no more dragons to slay or fair maidens to rescue? 

When did the moon stop following our family car at night? 

Is it following somebody else now? 

When did clouds stop forming animals and just start blocking the 
sun? 

How come I don't get a prize when I order a Big Mac combo? 

Why can't I order pancakes and syrup for dinner any more? 

When did a cup of coffee take preference over a steaming mug of hot 
chocolate with mounds of whipped cream, sprinkles, and a cherry? 

How come I can't eat my dessert first and the rest only if I have room? 

Do you think they would call it a drumstick if we weren't supposed 
to pick it up with our hands? 

How come there are no pictures in grown-up books? 

Who says the black lines in a coloring book are better art than the 
scribbles that go outside them? 

How come they don't carry silly string in hardware stores? 

How come now that we can actually afford our own pony, we'd rather 
buy a Colt, Mustang, or Bronco instead? 

When did work become more important than play? 

leant tellyou when, but at some moment I stopped seeing the world through 
tlie eyes of a child and started to think like a grown-up. At that moment I lost 
something that I want back— I lost a way of looking at things with curiosity and 
inventiveness. Ibegan to knozv t)ie answers so Istopped asking the questions. 

The artist Henri Matisse said toward the end of his prolific career, "I spent the 
first thirty years cfmy life trying to paint like an adult, and the rest of my life 
trying to paint like a child again. " 

Perhaps we should re-think this whole grown-up thing and try seeing creation 
through the eyes of a child once again. 

I can 't even imagine wliat new things we would learn and create if we did. 




A recent Associated Press 
article from Washington 
stated that: "Americans are 
angry and anxious — angry 
at their government and 
anxious about their future. " 

Americans, they say, are 
becoming less altruistic. No 
longer the benevolent, 
selfless, generous friend to 
the friendless, we are 
collectively disillusioned 
and self-absorbed 

More than forty percent said 
they often can't make ends 
meet and six in ten said they 
don't have enough money to 
lead the kinds of lives they 
want to. 

The same survey also 
discovered that some eighty 
percent of Americans have 
described themselves as 
God-fearing churchgoers 
who pray dairy and hold 
traditional values. 



11 



November 1994 




"The only thing 
certain, is change" 

The first commonly thought 
of computer was built in 
1944. It took up more space 
than an 18-wheeler's tractor 
trailer, weighed more than 1 7 
Chevrolet Ca ma ros, and 
comsumed 1 40,000 watts of 
electricity. It could ex ecu te up 
to 5,000 basic mathematical 
operations per second. 

One of today's popular 
microprocessors, the 486, is 
built on a tiny piece of silicon 
about the size of a dime. It 
weighs less than a packet of 
Sweet 'N Low and uses less 
that 2 watts of electricity. A 
486 canexecute up to 54 
million instructions per 
second. 

Let's say you are going to a 
party so you pull out some 
pocket change and buy a 
greeting card that plays 
"Happy Birthday" when it's 
opened. After the party, 
someone casually tosses the 
card into the trash. They 
have just thrown away more 
computer power than existed 
in the entire world before the 
year 1950. 

There has been more 
information produced in the 
last 30 years than during the 
previous 5,000. A weekday 
edition of the New York 
Times contains more 
information than the average 
person was likely to come 
across in a lifetime during 
1 7th-century England 

Taken from Price Pritchett, The Employee 
Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radi- 
cally Changing World (Dallas Pntchett & 
Associates, Inc, 1994) 



GRACE 



The Unchanging Value of Service 

Dr. Ron Manahan 

Convocation Address, Grace College and Seminary 



WEI^LD 



Our world is changing 
rapidly. There are signs of 
change all around. Some of the 
changes are subtle, some are not 
so subtle. (See sidebar.) 

It would be very easy to be 
intimidated by these changes, to 
respond out of fear. Change is 
not going away — and we will all 
be touched profoundly by it. 

So what are we to do as we 
live in a world of change? 

Accept change, don't run 
from it. But, by all means, 
identify with and live tena- 
ciously by those things that do 
not change. These virtuous 
habits of life are always true, 
appropriate, applicable. They do 
not wear out. They are always 
good and right. 

Our institution identifies 
with these virtuous habits of life 
in a very direct way. The worth 
of applying biblical values in 
strengthening character, sharp- 
ening competence, and prepar- 
ing for service is not altered by a 
changing world. I want us to 
focus on the last one — service. 

In Mark 9:35 Jesus calls his 
desciples to get beyond their 
own interests and agendas. He 
says to them: "If anyone wants to 
be first, he must be the very last, 
and the servant of all." 

Jesus is focusing our atten- 
tion on service, the abandon- 
ment of everything in order to 
bring help to another. It is about 
pursuing the interest of others, 
not simply our own. He does 
not ask that I be big, strong, 
famous, great, handsome, or 
powerful. He asks that I be 

12 



willing to give myself for the 
benefit of others. 

Am I willing to give up my 
own comforts in a changing 
world of deep need? What 
would that service look like? 
How can we weave his teaching 
into the fabric of our lives? 

First let me point out that the 
service which Jesus teaches 
tends toward frugality, not 
opulence — toward simplicity, 
not a smothering of possessions. 
If the driving force in our lives is 
the sprawl of ownership and 
consumption, measuring success 
in terms of accumulation, we are 
not following Jesus. 

Secondly, the service that 
Jesus teaches means moving 
beyond our comfort zones. 
Service calls us not to draw 
back, but to move out into a 
world of hurt, poverty, crime, 
pain, hunger, sorrow, racial 
tension, bitterness, cruelty, 
greed, and misery. It is there we 
are to practice the love of Christ 
and share His message of hope 
and redemption. 

Third, we must devote our 
service to the commission that 
Jesus gave each one of us: to 
bring people into a relationship 
with Jesus. As others come to 
know him, they will serve others 
and so the circle of service 
spreads. 

I call on all of us to pradice 
real service this year — not to be 
takers but givers; helpers with 
compassion and care for others. 
Let us devote ourselves to the 
interest of others — to love 
them — to be like Jesus. 



GOOD SPORTS 



Take Your Pick From Volleyball, 
Basketball, Baseball, Golf, Fishing, 
and PaddleTennis 

BY DAVE BRANON 

SPORTS SPECTRUM, SEPTEMBER 1994 



• -GETTING THE JUMP 

Rick Rassier of JUMP (Jump- 
ing Up with Mighty Power) is 
using volleyball to help kids. 
Through a variety of formats, 
including tournaments, clinics, 
and exhibitions, Team JUMP is 
telling young people how 
important it is to make the right 
choices — to save sex for mar- 
riage, to stay away from alcohol 
and other drugs, and most 
important, to put their trust in 
Jesus Christ. Through school 
assemblies, clinics and tourna- 
ments, Rick Rassier takes his 
undefeated, one-man volleyball 
team wherever he can challenge 
young people to be completely 
committed to Jesus Christ. 

Write to Rick Rassier at JUMP, 
1051 15th Ave South, St. Cloud 
MN 56301. or call 1-612-253-6097. 



• -PADDLER BEWARE! 

Literature from the Midwest 
Paddle Tennis Association 
comes complete with a warning: 
"The enjoyment and success you 
will experience in our game is 
contagious!" It sounds like a 
contagion that we all might 
want to get. Paddle tennis is a 
relatively obscure sport, but it 
has been played by such tennis 
notables as Bobby Riggs, Pancho 
Gonzalez, and Althea Gibson In 



fact, Gibson credits playing 
paddle tennis as a youngster 
with giving her a foundation for 
her later success at tennis. 

Paul Kelly, who is working 
with former Minnesota Viking 
Leo Lewis to promote the sport, 
says he plans to use paddle 
tennis as a way to "share the 
gospel of Jesus Christ." And 
both men want to take the game 
into the inner city. 

If you are interested in 
getting exposed to paddle 
tennis — and perhaps getting the 
bug, write to Paul Kelly, PO Box 
825, Litchfield, MN 55355-0825. 
Or call 1-612-693-7449. 

••PLAY BALL 

Athletes in Action is again 
offering you the chance of a 
lifetime. The second annual AIA 
Fantasy Baseball Camp & 
Enrichment Conference will be 
held in Kissimmee, Florida 
December 6-11 . For six days you 
can experience what it is like to 
be a pro baseball player as you 
hobnob with current and former 
Major League Baseball stars — at 
a price much lower than most 
fantasy baseball camps ask. 

Write to Ron Hobar at 1035 S. 
Semoran Boulevard, Suite 1047 
Winter Park, FL 32792. Or call 1- 
407-671-4800. 



o 








rfgv ° 


TfcV° 


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13 



November 1994 



GOOD SPORTS 




"IF GOD'S WITH ME, HOW COME HE DOESNT 
STRAIGHTEN THAT GUTS CURVE 3MIT 



••GOLF TALK 

PGA Tour player Bobby 
Clampett knows about the 
demands that are made on 
professional athletes. He also 
knows that many other men and 
women on the Tours want to tell 
others about their faith. Plus, he 
is aware that many organiza- 
tions want to reach out through 
golf. Thafs why he and Bill 
Poirier have teamed up to form 
Tour Players Outreach a liaison 
between groups who want to 
use golf as an outreach and tour 
players who want to help those 
groups. 

Write to Bill Poirier at Tour 
Players Outreach, 3 Carol Joy 
Road, Med ford, N J 08055. Or call 
1-609-953-1040. 

••"FOCAS"ON 
FISHING •• 
When the subject is fishing 
and the ques- 
tion is who's 
best at it, one 
name that 
might fit 
would be Hank 
Parker. He has 
been named 
"Angler of the 
Year" by the 
National Bass 
Association he 
has also won 
the BASS 
Master Classic 
twice, and he's 
in the top 5 on 
the all-time 
money-win- 
ning list. 

But Hank 
Parker's main 
focus isn't fish 



cfcjqqcyif 



it's on the man who turned five 
loaves and two fish into a meal 
for thousands: Jesus Christ. 
That's why Parker helped 
establish FOCAS (Fellowship of 
Christian Anglers Society). 

FOCAS has chapters across 
the country, including an active 
group in Wisconsin, headed up 
by Mike Holba. This family- 
centered chapter sponsors 
fishing tournaments, family 
picnics, a youth fishing jambo- 
ree, Bible studies, and educa- 
tional programs — all with a 
focus on fishing and a desire to 
serve and honor God. 

Write to Mike Holba, 127 5 
Morgan Avenue, Oshkosh, WI 
54901. Or call 1414-235-7284. 
The national office can be reached 
by culling 1-800-21-FOCAS. 

• -TRAVELING HOOPS 

Throughout the spring and 
summer, a dedicated group of 
basketball players have been 
taking their skills to places 
around the world for a good 
cause. This is the third year the 
Professional Athletes Outreach 
(PAO) has been using basketball 
as an outreach tool. 

First, PAO helps players find 
a spot on rosters of European 
teams — giving them an income 
and an opportunity to talk about 
their faith with the people in 
their new city. 

Second, PAO is sending 
teams to compete around the 
world. This year's clubs have 
schedules that include games in 
Hong Kong, Portugal, France, 
Germany, Holland, China, and 
India. 

Write to PAO Sport sLINK, 
1610 Elizabeth Street, Pasadena, 
CA 91104. Or call 1-818-398-2378. 



cHEIQLD 



14 



BOOKS 



The Brethren Adult Series for 
December, January, and February features: 




Some of the chapters included in this 
fascinating study : 

•Angels: Who are they? 

•The Angels and You 

•The Devil and his Fingerprints 

•How to Defeat the Devil 

•What about Life After Death? 



About the Author: 
Dr. Bernard N. Schneider (1906- 
1983) was a pastor for more than 
thirty years of Grace Brethren 
Churches and served as the 
Moderator for the Fellowship 
twice. He received both his M.Div 
and D.D. degrees from Grace 
Theological Seminary. 



With every order of 
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The Brethren Missionary Herald Company 
P.O.Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Toll-Free 1-800-348-2756 
15 



November 1994 



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CHEIQLD 16 



NEWS 



UPDATE ON THE LAWSUIT 

AGAINST THE 13 GRACE 
VILLAGE DIRECTORS: The suit 
was filed in July 1992. The trial 
began 9/6/94. The testimony phase 
ended 9/20/94. God sustained the 
Director-Defendants through this 
most difficult time. The lawyers 
will have presented their briefs and 
findings to the court by 10/20/94 
and the summary arguments orally 
before the judge on 11/8/94. 
Sometime later the judge will make 
his decision known. There is high 
probability that it will be appealed. 
The cost has been high for these 13 
Brethren— about $10,000 each so 
far! YOU CAN HELP. 

PRAY that God will: give the 
fullness of the Spirit and much 
wisdom to the fine Christian lawyer 
representing our brothers and 
sisters in this case; send a spirit of 
discernment and fairness to the 
judge to make the right decision. 

ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO GIVE 
to help these Brethren, some of 
whom have been stripped of most 
all their available funds. The 
National Ministerium has estab- 
lished a fund for this and gifts from 
churches, organizations, or indi- 
viduals can be channeled through 
the Ministerium. 

Castanhal, Brazil. "During July and 
August we had four first-time 
decisions," reports Earl Hodgdon. 
"Preach the Word and He will give 
the increase. Dorothy and I made 
another trip to Tailandia. We have 
four families from the Castanhal 
Brethren Church there. The Pente- 
costal population is stronger than 
the Catholic, but God has His elect 
there and we are anticipating a 
solid work to develop. The man 
heading up the work, Antonia 
Saraiva, is a spiritually qualified 
man who handles the Word well. 
Pray for him and for us." 

"August was a very good month for 
the ministry here," writes Dan 
Green from Uberlandia, Brazil. 



"We have had two people accept 
Christ and several visitors to our 
cell groups in Mansour." 

Tom and Mary Ann Barlow 

recently moved to a small rental 
house with a yard. It is a couple of 
miles from the center of Chalon, 
France. The girls are flourishing in 
this setting. Beatrice, daughter of 
one of the GBC members, was 
hospitalized after trying to take her 
life. "Ask God to direct us as we 
support her and her family through 
this difficult time," requests Tom. 
(Note: new address on next page.) 

Seven Mexican men graduated 
from the Grace Brethren Bible 
Institute in San Luis this past 
summer. They completed one year 
of class work at the Institute and 
another year of practical ministry in 
a local church. Pray for them as 
they move into the ministries the 
Lord has for them. 

Over 100 people attended both the 
family and youth camps at the 
Grace Brethren Campgrounds at 
Tecate, Mexico in July. 

The DeArmeys had a hectic week 
after their return to Lyon. Larry 
explains: 'Two days after our 
arrival, we went to visit the apart- 
ment that we had rented earlier. It 
was much smaller and dirtier than I 
had remembered. Both Vicki and I 
were pretty discouraged. I rushed 
into the agency from whom we 
were renting and asked if they had 
anything else available. To our 
surprise and joy, a larger one was 
open just three stories up. Because 
we had lived in an apartment in the 
same building for nine years, the 
company was willing to make the 
change. We rejoice in the Lord's 
provision. 

We are thrilled to be back in Lyon 
and to have the prospect of minis- 
try before us. Thanks so much for 
your prayers for our family." 

17 



Cecil O'Dell is leading a Bible 
study with eight international 
students in Tokyo, Japan. "This 
group has the potential of growing 
to over 20 or 30 stu dents by the end 
of this year. Many of the students 
are from, mainland China. Pray for 
the host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. 
Sasaki. They are a young Japanese 
couple who have not trusted Christ 
but are very open. They live in a 
dormitory as host parents and have 
contact with the students every day. 
We will be using a larger room, 
starting in September, because the 
study is becoming too large for 
their home. We are praying for 
many of these students to hear 
God's Word and respond." 

From Ralph Schwartz in Portugal: 
"Tim and Julie Hawkins have 
moved to the center of Porto and 
into the very apartment complex 
that we had prayed for. This week 
Tim met Bob and Anike at a local 
market. Dinner at the Hawkins' the 
following night revealed that they 
appear to be true Christians who 
just recently arrived in Portugal. 
They want to study the Bible and 
are interested in ou r cell group 
approach to church planting. 
Susanna, whom Margaret Hull has 
been discipling, is also showing real 
signs of being a true Christian. She 
is hoping to transfer to the Univer- 
sity of Porto where it will be 
possible for her to be a part of the 
InterVarsity group which will begin 
this fall under Tim's direction. I will 
be the coordinator for the Greater 
Porto Area Billy Graham "Mission 
World" Campaign coming up next 
March. Please pray that there 
would be those who will get excited 
about making this campaign a true 
outreach to this needy people. " 

Clay and Kim Hulett are back at 
square one as they consider where 
the Lord would have them begin a 
new work in Manila, Philippines . 
"It was over eight years ago that we 
looked at a map of Manila and 

November 1994 



NEWS 



asked the Lord where He wanted 
us to go to start the first GBC in the 
Phillipines. As we looked at that 
map, we marveled that it repre- 
sented 12 million people who 
needed to hear the Good News. 
Well, here we go again though 
things are a little bit different 
now — the map still looks the same 
but now there are 15 million people, 
five Grace Brethren Churches and 
we are hoping to start three new 
ones before the end of this year." 

On Labor-Day Weekend the first 
ever truly international ministry 
team from the Wooster GBC went 
to New York City to participate in 
the Brazilian Day in NYC. Under 
the direction of Pastor Ivanildo 
Trindade a team of 18 members — 
six Portuguese speaking (4 of 
whom are native Brazilians) — was 
formed, Portuguese literature was 
obtained, and contacts were estab- 
lished with pastors in New York. 
"There was overwhelming accep- 
tance of our ministry," says Pastor 
Trindade. "Thousands of people 
received our tracts and two prayed 
for salvation that day. We returned 
to Wooster a different group of 
people. We had seen the real world 
and we see now clearly the size of 
our debt to God. We are ready to do 
it again next year." 

This summer a team of nine college 
students and young adults from 
Grace Community Church of Seal 
Beach travelled to the Czech 
Republic and Hungary. Their first 
week was spent with Grace Breth- 
ren missionaries in Prague. While 
with the Swains and the Berndts, 
the team visited the Czech church 
and met Czech Christians. They 
also performed mimes in the parks 
and squares, which opened oppor- 
tunities to share. The team then 
continued on to Hungary to teach 
English to Hungarian young 
people. God gave many chances to 
speak . 




cHEBQW 



The Seed Beach team is pictured here 
with the Swain family. 



Cornelia Kammler, a Grace College 
senior from Switzerland is one of 
the 110,000 selected from the 10 
million applicants to win a U.S. 
"green card." Cornelia was born to 
European missionary parents in the 
Cameroon. She currently is living 
with Rev. Marvin and Dorothy 
Goodman in Winona Lake. The 
Goodmans have known her since 
her childhood, having also served 
as missionaries in Africa with her 
parents. Cornelia will graduate this 
spring and she plans to go to the 
Central African Republic to teach 
Mike and Myra Taylor's children. 

Deanna Caudill writes from 
Novosibirsk, Russia: "Grace Church 
is going well. We have a wonderful 
Russian pastor who has a heart to 
reach people. There are about 40-50 
adults in regular attendance. Ifs 
encouraging to see their excitement. 

Two more baptisms are scheduled 
for the Tokyo, Japan GBC. Mrs. 
Kubota and Mrs. doe are currently 
in baptism and membership classes. 
In Sept. the evangelism team held a 
film night for international students 
at a nearby university. Pray that 
God will use this to draw new 
students into the International 
Students's Bible Study. 

Six couples are scheduled to 
graduate from theBible Institute at 
Bossango a, Central African 
Republic, in December. 

18 



Thirteen children attended a 5-day 
Children's Club hosted by Brenda 
Welling and Bess Farrell in Mexico 
City, Mexico. Marice la, a Mexican 
convert who was baptized in Sept., 
is actively taking two other ladies 
through an evangelistic Bible study. 

Heidi Sisson and Martin McDaniel 

arrived safely in the Central African 
Republic. Heidi will be teaching the 
Taylor children and Martin will be 
helping with maintenance. 

Tim Hawkins attended important 
meetings at the end of Sept. which 
helped him become an effective 
leader of the InterVarsity group in 
the university of Porto, Portugal. 

Wayne Hannah, Ken and Ruth 
B aimer, Dan Green, and the 
Brazilian leader Egon Paulitsch 

visited the Portugal team during 
October. Part of the time was spent 
at the Charis International Alliance 
Conference that met in France with 
representatives from 15 countries 
around the world. 

Stan Deen, part-time Youth Direc- 
tor for the New Holland GBC, and 
teacher at Garden Spot High School 
reports that nearly 1000 students 
teachers and residents circled 
flagpoles at schools around 
Lancaster County on Sept. 21 to 
pray for their schools, students, 
administration, and country. 



ADDRESS CHANGES 

Tom and Mary Ann Barbw 

1 0, rue de la Roseraie 

TAISE 

71100 ST-REMY FRANCE 

IN MEMORY 

Ruth Brown, age 76, went to be with 
her Lord on June 23, 1 994. Ruth wasa 
faithful member of the Meyersdale 
GBC as well as the Pearls of Wisdom 
Fellowship Group. Pastor Randy 
Ha ulk officiated. 



LIGHTS 



We are delighted to introduce a new column written by women from our Fellowship, Like the woman 

of Proverbs 31, we bless others with our service and capable strength which grow out of obedience. 

Through the long nights, our lights do not go out. We hope the personal experiences and lessons 

shared will encourage you and stretch your boundaries of faith. 



Obedience is everything 

By Jenifer Wilcoxson 



I visit graveyards often. 

I slowly walk by stones 
carved with the tears of moth- 
ers, husbands, daughters, 
friends. As I stand among the 
graves I can almost taste the 
hideously painful hours that 
have passed under the sprawl- 
ing trees. Lives ended abruptly 
or too late, relationships sev- 
ered, hope held to the fire of 
apparent hopelessness. Eternity 
faced. 

But, I do not go there to cry 
old tears or wander through my 
own dark memories. Actually, 
the reality that those well- 
trimmed humps teach is neither 
grim nor gruesome. 

Reading the inscriptions, 
smiling at an unusual epitath, 
watching the leaves fall around 
them, I often perch on one 
especially well situated or 
comfortably shaped, to watch 
the wind blow. Looking out over 
the lake or pond they so often 
guard, I have learned the only 
lesson I really need to remem- 
ber: obedience is everything. 

Before the first shovel is lifted 
to make room for my body, I 
will be standing with the Lord 
in Heaven. His eyes will look 
long and searchingly into 
mine — at that moment, my 
obedience is all that will matter. 




Lamplight 
Chronicles 



"Her lamp does not go out at night" 



Unfortunately, it's nearly 
impossible for me to keep that 
fact clearly in my mind. 

Someone keeps whispering in 
my ear that the here and now 
should not have to be sacrificed 
on the altar of some far-down- 
the-road eternity. Surely my 
happiness has some value for 
consideration. 

A slightly louder and some- 
what more authoritative voice 
adds that obedience is fine, just 



as long as it makes sense and is 
clearly the best option After all, 
I'm an intelligent woman who 
understands the value of assess- 
ing my options and making a 
smart choice. 

So, I visit graveyards often. 

Their silence washes away 
my insightful rationalizations. 
Their inscriptions remind me 
that my "here and now" has 
already far outstretched the time 
given to many others. Theirs is a 
much sharper picture of what 
life's options truly are. 

Know what you want the end 
to be and make sure every step 
you take moves you toward that 
result. Force yourself to stay 
focused on the end while you're 
in the middle. That's some of the 
best advice I was ever given. 

I will face the Lord. Then, my 
feeble rationalizations that took 
me away from Him won't seem 
quite so intelligent. Missing my 
chance to look into His eyes and 
hear Him say "I'm proud of 
you" will not be worth my 
pursuit of I-deserved-it, selfish 
happiness. Today, filled with 
obedience that doesn't feel good 
or make sense, is a small price to 
pay for the end I want — for the 
words: "Well done." 

Now, if I can just hang on to 
that for tomorrow. 



/ wanted to introduce myself to you as 
the new Managing Editor of the Herold and 
share a bit of my heart . 
—Jenifer 



19 



November 1994 



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R E T H R EJfJSfc IM.-'-J 




Vol. 56 No if^fc^ 



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December 1994 



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EDITORIAL 




Jeff Carroll 

Year-End 
Reflections 

We're into the home stretch of 
this year — 1994. 

With November came 
Thanksgiving when we took the 
time to reflect on God's provi- 
sion and faithfulness to us this 
year. For some there was an 
empty place around the table — 
a loved one is enjoying Thanks- 
giving in the presence of God. 
For others a new place was set, 
as new lives were welcomed 
into their hearts and homes. 

Now, with December, comes 
Christmas. A time we remem- 
ber and rejoice at the birth of 
Jesus. Each year we hear the 
story of the marvelous plan that 
God had in sending His Son to 
earth — that story never loses its 
power. 

We celebrate Christmas every 
year. We wouldn't think of 
doing otherwise. 

Some of my favorite memo- 
ries as a child are linked to our 
church's Christmas Eve services. 
The candles glowed softly as we 
sang the familiar carols. In our 
hearts we sensed that Jesus was 



there. Like the shepherds and 
the wise men, we worshipped 
the newborn King. 

Then we rushed home to 
open our presents. Funny, I can't 
seem to remember any of the 
presents but I will never forget 
the people of my church and the 
pastors who led those Christmas 
Eve services. 

But December also brings the 
end. Unfortunately, for many of 
us, the end of the year can be a 
time of great depression. We 
realize that another year has 
passed and we didn't lose those 
ten pounds, failed to accomplish 
anything significant, and are no 
further ahead than we were last 
year at this time. Our failure 
stares us right in the face and 
drains every ounce of joy we'd 
built up between Thanksgiving 
and Christmas. 

This year, try something 
different. In the evenings be- 
tween Christmas and New 
Year's Day, when the house is 
quiet and everyone else has 
gone to bed, sit near your tree 
shining with lights and decora- 
tions and think. With an open 
Bible, and a fresh sheet of paper 
make a list of three things you 
want to do differently in 1995. 

I urge you to limit the list to 
no more than three. Don't turn 
these goals into New Year's 
Resolutions easily forgotten by 
mid- February. 

Next, pray about these goals. 
Ask God to help you see practi- 
cal steps that you can take each 
day to see these changes real- 
ized in your life. Write down 
every idea He gives. 

Finally, put these goals in the 
fly-leaf of your Bible so you will 
be clearly reminded every day 
of your new direction. 




I am the new year. 

I am an unspoiled page in 
your book of time. 

I am your next chance at the 
art of living. 

I am your opportunity to 
practice what you have 
learned about life during the 
last twelve months. 

All that you sought and 
didn't find is hidden in me, 
waiting for you to search it 
out with more determination. 

All the good that you tried for 
and didn't achieve is mine to 
grant when you have fewer 
conflicting desires. 

All that you dreamed but 
didn't dare to do, all that you 
hoped but did not will, all the 
faith that you claimed but did 
not have — these slumber 
lightly, waiting to be awak- 
ened by the touch of a strong 
purpose. 

I am your opportunity to re- 
new your allegiance to Him 
who said, "Behold, I make all 
things new." 



December 1994 



CONTENTS 



CHERALD 



Volume 56 No. 11 December 1994 


3 


EDITORIAL 




Year-End Reflections 


5 


FEATURE 


Somebody Open a Window 


7 


THE PEOPLE WE MEET 


Marilyn Quayle 


9 


CE 

Don't Underestimate Children 


10 


WMC 

Missionary of the Year: Kim Hulettt 


11 


CONSIDER 




A Mission Story 


12 


CHARIS INTERNATIONAL 




A Report 


13 


GOOD SPORTS 




NFL Heroes and Slam Dunk 


17 


NEWS 


19 


LIGHTS 




Lamplight Chronicles 






This month, look for the holly columns — 
they are filled with Christmas cheer and 
interesting insights into the holiday. 



"HEB^W 



Publisher: Jeff Carroll 

Managing Editor: Jenifer Wilcoxson 

Printer: Evangel Press 

Department Editors: 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries: Ron Thompson 

CE National: Ed Lewis 

Foreign Missions: Tom Julien, Kip Cone 

Grace Schools: Ron Manahan, Kathryn Scanland 

Home Missions: Larry Chamberlain, Jesse Deloe 

Women's Missionary Council: Mary Thompson 

Herald Newsline: 219-267-7826 

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FEATURE 



Somebody Open a Window 

The cry for fresh air 




By Pastor Davy L. Troxel 



Our nation, an amalgam- 
ation of millions of individu- 
als, is screaming 
for an open 
window. In the 
name of personal 
rights and free- 
doms, our society 
has been 
stretched to the 
limits of perse- 
verance. Crime, 
perversion, and 
the political 

endorsement of injustice, 
have all combined in the last 
few years to cause even our 
humanistic society to cry out 
for a breath of fresh air. 

At first the cry came in the 
form of an increased interest 
in nostalgia. The constant 
pelting of our national moral- 
ity by feminists, the hippie 
movement, television net- 
works, homosexuals, madcap 
court cases, and runaway 
slaughter of innocent people, 
have all served to push even 
an immoral society like ours 
to the breaking point. 

Ironically, it was the media 
that first responded to the 



"People have 
grown tired of 
living life on 
the edge of 
insanity." 



pressures with some kind of 
relief — albeit clearly and 

purely for merce- 
nary reasons. 
They fed the 
insatiable demand 
for old television 
programs. Early 
programming like 
'The Dick 
VanDyke Show," 
"I Love Lucy," and 
"Andy Griffith" 
were in such 
demand that entire networks 
were born and underwritten 
almost overnight. 

Even radio got in on the 
act. "Oldies" stations became 
big business quickly. Some 
stations went a step farther, 
offering music from the Big 
Band Era, along with replays 
of old radio shows. Restau- 
rants and ice cream parlors 
have made millions empha- 
sizing the fifties' theme. 

People are clamoring with 
loud pocketbooks for a way 
to escape to a more innocent 
age. Whatever they might 
boast on the outside about 
wanting to be "nineties kind 



"Such New Age cult activity is 
based in a philosophy that man 
is divine. Smart people are grop- 
ing for philosophical answers to 
global problems. 

"We're in a perplexed time in 
history. In many ways Western 
philosophy has left modem man 
bankrupt of ultimate meaning. 
"I see an opening among intelli- 
gent people who are vulnerable 
to stylish teaching that meshes 
with the reality they want." 




— Tal Brooke, head of 
the Spiritual Counterfeits 
Project about the deaths 
connected to the Luc Jouret 
Solar Temple Cult. 



December 1994 



FEATURE 



•J 



Jesus: 
The Theme of Christmas 

The Theme of the Christmas 
story is God's divine love for a 
fallen human race. His love was 
presented in a tiny package that 
arrived in Bethlehem and it was 
spelled out in one word: Jesus 

Jesus — a simple name with so 
much power and meaning, but on 
that night so long ago, the tiny 
baby, wrapped by Mary in 
swaddling clothes, waving little 
arms, hungrily sucking a fist, was 
like any other newborn baby. 
Jesus was helpless and depen- 
dent, and Mary was His hope of 
survival, His nourishment, His 
very lifeline. 

God entrusted His most 
priceless gift to a very human, 
very young, earthly mother. 
Why? Because God so loved — 
that he gave. 

He relinquished His hold on 
His Son and placed Him in fragile 
human arms. He sent Him to 
minister and eventually die. His 
death was no surprise to the 
Father. It was essential. There was 
no other way for sinners to be 
reconciled to a holy and just God. 

Janette Oke's 
Reflections on the Christmas Story. 



cHEIQLD 



Somebody Open a Window 

continued from previous page 

of people," inside, society as a 
whole seems to be sick to 
death of the moral wasteland. 

By their wholesale retreat 
to the more wholesome past, 
people have purported at 
least a curiosity, if not a 
desire, for real peace in the 
soul. They have grown tired 
of living their lives on the 
edge of insanity. 

It is relaxing and refresh- 
ing to hear a comedy routine 
that we can 
trust to be 
clean, so that 
we don't 
stand con- 
tinuously on 
guard with 
the delivery 
of the punch 
line. 

Life 
involves 
more than 
sex, though 
any outside 
observer of America would 
probably not arrive at that 
conclusion. Entertainment 
does not have to come from 
an electronic device, but we 
seem paralyzed to find other 
options. 

The peace of mind that 
should come from a devoted 
day's work has long been 
supplanted by a frenzied 
fight for more money and 
benefits. The skill of the 
individual craftsman is 
screaming out to be recog- 



nized above the din of the 
dollar bill. 

People are finally rejecting 
the past thirty-five years of 
being told what they must 
identify with, what they 
should tolerate, and how they 
should let the irresponsible 
sector rape the dedicated 
citizens. 

Our God-given common 
sense, at least in the Christian 
realm, has finally begun to 
break the 
bonds and 



"People are finally 
rejecting the past thirty- 
five years of being told 
what they must identify 
with, what they should 
tolerate, and how they 
should let the irrespon- 
sible sector rape the 
dedicated citizens/' 



gags imposed 
upon us by 
the purvey- 
ors of the 
belief in the 
Utopia of 
human rights 
built on the 
foundation of 
Satan. 

Unfortu- 
nately, a loss 
of innocence 
can, at best, be replaced only 
by a sincere grasp of divine 
forgiveness. Even should 
America's pendulum swing 
completely back the other 
way, it still simply reminds us 
of the Lord's ever-ticking 
time clock counting down to 
Christ's return. 

But, if the mass exodus 
from the radical rat race can 
be directed, a real breath of 
fresh air might sweep our 
country as we throw open the 
windows to let God in. 



INTERVIEW 



People We Meet 



Marilyn Tucker Quayle 



Q: What has given you the 
most pleasure over the past year 
since being out of Washington? 

A: What is nice for me is 
living in a community again. 
You don't realize that Washing- 
ton is not a community like you 
might think of one — where all 
the citizens work together to 
make the community better. In 
Washington it's a hodgepodge 
of suburbs and there's not a 
sense of unity. That is one of the 
reasons that Washington has 
many internal problems within 
the structure of the city. The 
community spirit, the feeling 
that you are giving back to your 
community just isn't there and I 
miss that terribly. 

Q: Why do you think Dan 
describes you as "Editor-in- 
Chief" not just of his book, 
Standing Firm, but for all his 
life's endeavors? 

A: We have a very sharing 
relationship and I think that is 
what makes a marriage work. I 
can't imagine our life if we 
didn't share what each other 
were doing and go to each other 
for counsel. 

Q: How have the lives of 
your three children been af- 
fected by the public arena in 
which they've lived? 




•J 



Mrs Quayle was the speaker at the inaugural for Dr. Ronald Manalian, 

President of Grace College and Theological Seminary. 

She joined the other guests for a luncheon and is here with 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Melton, long-time friends of Grace schools. 



A: They would probably be 
better at answering that. I do 
know that right now, they are all 
three thrilled to be back to 
"normal" again. 

Tucker is now twenty and he 
feels that everything he went 
through was a positive experi- 
ence. Ben is coming around to 
that and Conine — well it's 
going to be a while. I think that 
is a product of her age. When 
you're a teenager, you don't 
want to be different. You want to 
be treated just like everybody 
else. To have had such a differ- 
ent life, she doesn't talk about it, 
her friends have to practically 
pry things out of her. But that 
will change as she gets older. 

But, we sheltered them. We 
made a deal with the Washing- 
ton Press: we won't use our 
children for vote-getting and 
you won't cover them in stories 
about us. We lived up to that 
and so did the press. Our chil- 
dren had, under the circum- 
stances, very normal lives. 

continued on next page 



Joseph and Mary 

From the ground level, 
Joseph and Mary were 
insignificant nobodies 
from a nothing town. They 
were peasants. They were 
poor, uneducated, of no 
account. They capsulize 
the mystery of grace — 
because the King does not 
come to the proud and 
powerful, but to the poor 
and powerless. 

-The Gift 

by R. Kent Hughes 
& Ron DiCianni 



December 1994 



INTERVIEW 



•J 



Shepherds Came 

"The shepherds," says Dr. 
George Bradford Caird, "were 
despised by the orthodox because 
the nature of their job made reli- 
gious observance haphazard. 

"But they were Christ's first 
worshippers — forerunners of the 
ordinary people who later heard 
Him gladly. The wonder with 
which the shepherds' story was 
greeted prepares us for the deeper 
wonder to come." 

Dr. Caird, a Scotsman who 
worked in Canada and Oxford, was 
a brilliant classical scholar and 
skilled Bible teacher. He made this 
English translation of a 15th cen- 
tury Latin carol on the 'pastores' — 
the shepherds. 



Shepherds came, their praises 
bringing, Who had heard the angels 
singing Far from you be fear 
unruly, Christ is King of glory born. 



Wise men whom a star had 
guided, Incense, gold and myrrh 
provided, Made their sacrifices 
truly, to the King of glory born. 



Jesus, born the King of Heaven, 
Christ to us through Mary given, To 
your praise and honour duly, Be 
resounding glory done. 



Christmas Carols and Their Stories 
compiled by Christopher Idle 



< HEr^4LD 



Marilyn Quayle continued 

Q: How do you feel about the 
current administration? 

A: I am very saddened by it. 
We're all Americans. We want 
the administrations to work, we 
want the country to work. It is 
very sad for me to travel around 
the world as I have in the last 
year and have people stop me 
and say: "What is happening to 
your country?" 

We do not have a govern- 
ment equal to what the found- 
ing fathers anticipated. They 
expected a continual influx of 
change in the leadership within 
Congress. It was supposed to be 
a citizen legislature. Members 
were to serve a few years and 
then go back home to their 
profession which they kept. 

Now we have a professional 
legislature which is causing us 
great problems. They don't live 
under the laws they create. They 
exempt themselves from the 
laws so we don't have account- 
ability at the federal level. 



Q: Will Dan run? 

A: I know it sounds trite, but 
he really doesn't know. The two 
big questions are: Does he have 
a vision for America? and Do 
we, as a family, want to go 
through it? He does have a 
vision — things he feels that he 
can accomplish. As to the second 
question, we know how difficult 
it can be. 

We go through all of the 
considerations: who can really 
change government; who has 
the ability to forge the coalitions; 
who does have a vision for 
change; who will stand up and 
take the grief for fundamentally 
changing the way government 
operates, putting it back where 
it should be? 

I think if I were honest, I 
would say I hope somebody else 
comes forward. But right now I 
can see no one else. Still, the 
question remains: do we want to 
withstand it again? We have not 
made the decision yet. 




Rev. Charles Thornton, Chairman of the Board, led in the inauguratwn of 
Dr.Ronald Manahan as the fifth President of Grace College and Seminary. 



CE 



Children's Ministries Reaching Your Community 
By Chery Otermat, 

Director of Girls Ministries and Ministry teams 

"And a little child will lead them" 



Children's ministries can be a 
strategic means of reaching your 
community for Christ. Through 
various outreach events it is 
possible to provide a fun, safe 
environment where nonbeliev- 
ers can hear the gospel. 

A children's outreach event is 
geared to the non-Christian 
child, where he or she can have 
an enjoyable experience and 
have the opportunity to become 
a Christian. It is bathed in 
prayer, centers around a theme, 
and includes: 

• Game andjor activity time. 

• Brief Program consisting of a 
child's testimony of how he/she 
came to know the Lord and the 
presentation of the gospel which 
is tied into the program's theme. 

• Interaction that allows for 
sharing, serving refreshments, 
and relationship building. 

Children's outreach tools are 
also effective in reaching your 
community for Christ. Such as: 

• Children Passing Out 
Invitations to their church or an 
outreach event. These invita- 
tions can be passed out to other 
children on a playground. 

• Wordless Bracelets. CE 

National has all the information 
you need to make a wordless 
bracelet. They can then be worn 
to school and used to share the 
salvation message with friends. 

• Cross Illustration. This 
illustration has been used 



effectively by children and 
adults. It consists of one tear of a 
piece of paper that forms a cross 
and clearly communicates the 
salvation message. Along with 
the illustration is a story about a 
child who was in prison for 
sharing his faith. Both the 
illustration and the story are 
available from CE National. 



How do we determine the 
success of a children's outreach 
event? Evaluation should center 
around these questions: 

1. Were non-Christian chil- 
dren and parents present? 

2. Was the gospel clearly 
presented? 

3. Did nonbelievers have an 
opportunity to respond to 
the gospel? 

Children are not only effec- 
tive in reaching others, but can 
be very effective in reaching the 
parents of their friends. SMM 
girls' club program, through the 
use of the Main Event, has a 
built-in means for follow-up of 
parents. This element can easily 
be built in to your event by 
obtaining names and addresses 
of those who attend. Parents 
often appreciate an explanation 
of the event, and this is an open 
door for you to meet them. 

Let's not underestimate 

the impact of one child 

reaching another for the 

sake of Christ. 



[DEAS-IDEAS«IDEAS*IDEAS 

Popular Outreach Events: 

A BAG PARTY— held where 
bag lunches can be served, bag 
games played, and an object 
lesson using the colors of the 
wordless book can be taught. 
These colors can be represented 
in a bag lunch, using different 
food items to represent the 
colors. An explanation of the 
wordless book concept is 
available from Child Evangelism 
Fellowship. 

A BARN PARTY— complete 
with hayride, bonfire, and 
s'mores. The gospel presentation 
can center around carving out a 
pumpkin, showing all of the 
"junk" God takes out of our life 
and replacing it with a candle 
showing the light that God 
places in our lives when we 
invite Him in. 

FATHER /DAUGHTER 
DRESS-UP— a dress up date 
with Dad. This even centers 
around a dinner with a valentine 
or love theme including a 
testimony and sharing of the 
gospel. The message focus could 
parallel a father's love for his 
daughter to our Heavenly 
Father's love for each of us. 

FATHER /SON "GUYS 
NIGHT OUT"— centering 
around an athletic theme; 
potentially having an athlete 
from the community share his 
salvation testimony and present- 
ing the gospel of who a true 
"winner" is in this world. 




NATIONAL 



December 1994 



WMC 



Presents 

Christmas is a good 
time for gift giving. After 
all, we are celebrating the 
greatest gift ever given — 
God's son. Our giving 
should reflect His love. 

It isn't easy to keep 
one's perspective. Christ- 
mas has become too 
commercial, too carefully 
merchandized, too crassly 
materialistic to lend itself to 
teaching any spiritual truth 
about giving. 

Ask yourself this year if 
your giving reflects the 
spirit of Him who gave His 
best for us — just because 
He loves us. 

The Miracle of Christmas 
— MacArthur 



For God so loved the world that 

He gave His only begotten Son, 

that whosoever believeth in Him 

should not perish, but have 

everlasting life. 

John 3:16 



Each year several missionary 

women are chosen to be 

honored as WMC Missionaries 

of the Year. A visual 

presentation of these women 

may be ordered from Grace 

Brethren Foreign Missions, 

P.O. Box 588, Winona Lake, 

IN 46590. Please give the 

desired date, indicate slide/tape 

or video, and include a 
contribution to cover expenses 



C HEI^LD 



: 1994-95 

Missionary of Year 



I grew up in southern Califor- 
nia with one older brother and a 
twin brother. During those years 
my family moved an average of 
once a year. I was a very shy and 
timid girl and with our frequent 
moves, it was hard for me to 
make friends. 

When I was twelve years old 
my family moved to southwest- 
ern Missouri where our "roots" 
were. This was a disaster and six 
months later we returned to 
California. Now it was even 
harder to make friends because 
of the southern accent I had 
acquired. The kids loved to tease 
me about it and I was very 
lonely and unhappy. 

At that time my family began 
going to church and after much 
persuasion I decided to attend. 
There I heard about the Friend 
who would never leave, would 
always love me, and would 
accept me as I am. A few days 
before my thirteenth birthday I 
asked Jesus into my heart. 

Through my sophomore year 
in high school I went to public 
schools. Then I was able to 
attend Grace Brethren High 
School. Those last two years of 
high school were wonderful. 

Soon after I graduated, I 
began attending the Long Beach 
GBC and became very active in 
the college group. There I met 
my husband Clay and we were 
married August 11, 1979. The 
following summer we went to 
Japan for a short-term ministry. 
Through this experience the 
Lord led us to missions. 

In 1984 we went to the 
Philippines as pioneer mission- 

10 




Kim with her husband Clay and their 
sons Raymond, Ryan, and Richard 



aries for FGBC. We live in 
Metro-Manila, a megalopolis 
with enormous pollution. The 
people have vast needs and we 
are committed to evangelism, 
discipleship, and training. 

For over five years before 
going to Manila, Kim and Clay 
ministered to university stu- 
dents through the Long Beach 
GBC. Their work of evangelism, 
discipleship, and Bible teaching 
influenced over 600 students 
each week. Kim says she can 
also see that the background of 
her early life, although not easy, 
was also good training. 

When asked to share some- 
thing she has learned she says: 
'Trust God. People ask us if 
we're afraid living here. I can 
only answer that we are always 
in His hands, even when I don't 
feel that is so." 

Her words to us: "Keep it up 
ladies. All you do is so encour- 
aging to us. We know you are 
praying. We know you are 
giving. We know there is so 
much that would not be accom- 
plished if not for you. Thanks so 
much." 



CONSIDER 



A Mission Story 

By Pastor Terry Daniels 

South Pasadena Grace Brethren Church 



Once upon a time a ragged, 
hungry orphan lived on the 
streets of a large city. Being an 
orphan, he belonged to no one, 
but he was not alone because 
of his friendship with other 
street urchins. They slept in 
boxes or under bushes, they 
shared food, and looked out 
for each other. 

One day while exploring a 
strange part of town, he came 
upon an unlocked garden gate. 
Pushing it open he was sur- 
prised to see quantities of food, 
drink, and sweets greater than 
he had ever imagined, even in 
his dreams. 

Being very hungry, and 
convinced that a few small 
items would not be missed, he 
slipped through the gate. Once 
inside he found a pleasant 
garden with provision for all of 
his needs. And, the biggest 
surprise of all — a sign reading: 
"Free for all who desire." 

Only if you have been very 
hungry for a very long time 
can you imagine how he 
gorged himself with that fine 
food. When he was almost 
ready to burst, he fell down 
under a shade tree to nap. 
When he woke up, he thought: 
"I must go and tell the others." 

But all the delights of the 
garden caught his eyes and he 
began to eat again. That night, 
as he drifted off into a glutton- 
ous stupor, he decided: "I will 
go tell the others tomorrow." 



When he woke the next 
morning, he thought again of his 
duty, but then he looked closely 
at the garden and it did not 
seem as big as it had looked at 
first. He thought: "I should tell 
the others, but if I do there 
might not be enough." So he put 
it off for another day. 

The next day he formulated a 
plan. He would only stay and 
eat until he was sure that his 
needs were met. Then he would 
go and tell the others. So he 
began to spend his days eating, 
drinking, and sleeping and he 
became quite a connoisseur of 
the food in the garden. 

Finally the day arrived when 
he decided it was time to spread 
the news and share his hoard. 
But, when he went to the gate, 
he found he was too fat to get 
through it. At first this dis- 
tressed him greatly; but then he 
decided that he would send the 
first thin person who came 
through the gate back out to tell 
the others, and he relaxed. While 
he waited for that person to 
come, he would enjoy the 
delights of the garden. 

At first he would check daily 
to see that the gate was un- 
locked. Then he quit paying 
attention to the gate. Shortly 
after that he even forgot that 
there were others starving 
outside the garden. The rest of 
his life was spent indulging in 
the delicacies of the garden and 
the others never heard. 



•-S 



Not when, but how 

Christmas as a holiday 
was not observed until well 
after the biblical era. In fact, 
Christmas was not given 
any kind of official recogni- 
tion by the church until the 
mid-fifth century. 

The Puritans of early 
America rejected Christmas 
altogether. They deliber- 
ately worked on December 
25 to show their disdain. A 
law passed in England in 
1644, making it an official 
working day, reflected a 
similar Puritan influence. 
For a time in England it 
was literally illegal to cook 
plum pudding or mince pie 
for the holidays. 

Christians today are 
generally not opposed to 
celebrating Christmas. The 
holiday in itself is nothing 
and observing it is neither 
right or wrong. 

Haw we observe Christ- 
mas is the central issue. Do 
we observe it for the Lord's 
sake? Do we even think 
about why and how we 
celebrate? 

Christmas is an oppor- 
tunity for us to exalt Jesus 
Christ. We ought to take 
advantage of it. 

John F. MacArthur, Jr. 



11 



December 1994 



CHARIS 



Charis- 
International 

October 3-8, 1994 



"Tlie Charis meeting in France was 
probably the most significant gath- 
ering of Grace Brethren leaders I've 
had the privilege to attend. The men 
truly have hearts for God, His 
Word, and for evangelism and dis- 
cipleship. How encouraging it was 
to hear positive reports from all 
around the world by leaders of such 
high quality. I am so grateful to be 
part ofafellmoship of churches that 
is beginning to network together to 
carry the full counsel of God to 
people around the globe. If the Lord 
tarries, we are at the threshold of a 
new cooperative effort. Thank you 
for allowing me to represent you at 
this landmark conference. " 

— Ed Lewis, Moderator 



During six historic days in 
October, delegates at the Charis- 
International Alliance Confer- 
ence met to encourage one 
another with news of what God 
is doing in their countries, to 
learn from each other, and to 
explore ways that Grace Breth- 
ren churches around the world 
can help one another. 

They came from some of the 
largest cities in the world and 
some of the most primitive — 
from both prosperous and poor 
countries. They brought varying 
degrees of formal education and 
ministry experience. And, of 
course, each came as a unique 
product of his own culture. 

The international conference 
was run by the delegates them- 
selves. Florent Varak, pastor of 
the GBC in Lyon, France, did 
much of the organizational work 
and served as the moderator. 

While GBFM staff and field 
superintendents attended, their 
input into the process was 
minimal. One purpose of Charis 
was to signal a new era — to 
communicate that GBFM does 
not consider national leaders to 
be "children" but rather brothers 
in world evangelism. 



The six days of Charis in- 
cluded formal sessions in which 
delegates addressed such sub- 
jects as: What is a church? What 
is the church mandate? and 
How to team up to reach our 
generation for Christ. Each 
morning selected delegates 
shared information about the 
work in their country — both 
success and failures. There was 
profitable interaction as they 
shared their methods for reach- 
ing their communities. 

As the week progressed, they 
moved into talks aimed at 
stimulating new, practical 
methods of cooperation. 

All discussions and talks had 
to be translated into one of three 
languages used during the 
conference: English, French, and 
Spanish. Despite the language 
and cultural barrier a spirit of 
unity prevailed and each man 
attempted to understand his 
brother better. 

A deep sense of fellowship 
and a united vision for reaching 
the world pervaded the Charis 
conference. Indeed a new era of 
vision, teamwork, and mission 
was born. 



On September 4, 1900, 
a group of Brethren met 
under the trees of 
Winona Lake, Indiana 
to discuss the formation 
of the Foreign 
Missionary Society. 
Tliey planted a seed 
which has born much 
fruit. On October 8, 
1994, thirty-four men 
representing 200,000 
Grace Brethren in 
thirteen different 
countries, joined hands 
under the trees at the 
Chateau of St. Albain, 
France to thank God for 
what He has done over 
the past 94 years and to 
commit themselves to 
the work of the Great 
Commission. 



"HEE^ID 




12 



GOOD SPORTS 



NFL Movers With A Mission 

By Watson "Waddy" Spoelstra 




The National Football League 
is served by an outreach that has 
no central office, no executive 
layers, and no name. Just a 
bunch of beardown guys mak- 
ing phone calls back and forth. 

The NFL has twenty-eight 
chaplains, one for each city. Few 
chaplains have pro sports 
backgrounds. All have creden- 
tials in Bible teaching. Pregame 
chapel services and 
team Bible stud- 
ies are prime 
assignments. 
Chaplains are 
available for 
individual or 
husband-and- 
wife counsel- 
ing. Their zeal is 
centered on helping 
people put their faith in Christ — 
primarily players, coaches, and 
stadium personnel. New believ- 
ers are guided into growth. 

In addition, many high- 
profile NFL people speak openly 
of their faith. Think about 
players and coaches who have 
persuasively talked about their 
relationship with Jesus. Start 
with Reggie White, Mike 
Singletary, Steve Largent, and 
Anthony Munoz. 

Then mix in Barry Sanders 
and Kent Graham. Upfront for 
head coaches in the 90s are 
Mike Holmgren and Dan 
Reeves. Go back a few years to 
Tom Landry, Joe Gibbs, and 
Raymond Berry. There are more 
where these come from. 
Where a Circle Begins 

One of the most famous 
football testimonies for God 



started with the chaplaincy 
program. Four years ago 49er 
chaplain Pat Richie and his 
counterpart with the Giants 
Dave Bratton, charted a time of 
postgame prayer on the field at 
Candlestick Park. A dozen 
players from both sides knelt 
near midfield with clasped 
hands. Tight end Howard Cross 
of the Giants did the praying. 
This was the origin of the 
circle prayer. It has spread 
through the NFL and 
filtered down to colleges 
and high schools. You 
might have caught it on 
TV after the last four 
Super Bowls. Watch for it 
again on January 29 
in Miami. 

Getting Started 
When did the whole 
NFL chapel movement begin? 
Baseball Chapel leader Dave 
Swanson says, "Ira 'Doc' 
Eshleman is the daddy of all 
sports ministries. Years ago he 
asked me to help handle all the 
football phone calls." 

Eshleman, now retired, was a 
sports-minded preacher who 
showed up at football club- 
houses during the 60s. Over the 
years His Bible-based messages 
softened many hearts. 

Eshleman's son Paul was 
perceptive. He said, "Dad, how 
are you going to train all these 
guys getting saved?" This led to 
establishment of Pro Athletes 
Outreach (PAO), a teaching 
ministry that changes lives. 

Norm Evans, all-pro tackle 
with the Miami Dolphins, later 
became PAO president. 



WEIGHTY 
MATTERS 

A Tribute to Paul Anderson 



Lef s dispense with the stats 
in the life and times of Paul 
Anderson, Olympic gold medal 
weightlifter, except to say that the 
champ packed 375 pounds on a 5- 
foot-9 frame. The Russians called 
him a "wonder of nature." What 
they missed is that the huge 
fellow was a child of God. 

Paul Anderson, 61, died on 
August 15 at Vidalia, Georgia 
where he and his wife Glenda ran 
a youth home. 

Turn back a few decades to 
Melbourne, Australia. There in 
the 1956 Olympics his tempera- 
ture dropped to 94 degrees, 
leaving him wobbly. Doctors 
ruled him out. Somehow he 
talked his way around the 
medical staff. As he took his turn 
in the finals, he prayed: "Lord, I 
haven't paid enough attention to 
You. Get me through this and I'll 
never wander again." A burst of 
energy brought him the super- 
heavyweight gold medal. He 
came home a national hero. 

Someone once said: "More 
than anything, Anderson lifted 
lives." He often proclaimed: I'm 
the World's Strongest Man, but I 
can't get by for five minutes 
without Jesus Christ." 

Muscular Paul Anderson 
showed us all that the real 
strength in life is not physical, but 
spiritual. 



Sports Spectrum, October 1994 



13 



December 1994 



GOOD SPORTS 



Slam Dunk: B-Ball Fun With A Purpose 

By Tom Felton, Sports Spectrum 



WINNING PLAYERS TALK ABOUT 
BASKETBALL, FAMILY, AND FAITH 




Editor, Sports Spectrum 
FOREWORD BY PAT WILLIAMS 




e didn't have the people. I told him we didn't have the budget . 
but he just had to do a living Christmas tree. 



cHERQLD 



Hey Hoop Fans — this one's 
for you! 

Slam Dunk, published by 
Moody Press in Chicago, is hot 
off the (full -court) press and 
teeming with dream basketball 
players. Packed in the pages of 
this new book are the stories of 
seventeen National Basketball 
Association performers — current 
hardwood greyhounds with a 
dash of stars from yesteryear 
(the greybeards) mixed in. Each 
of these B-ball standouts is also 
a committed believer in Jesus 
Christ. Their faith, and how it 
has helped them deal with life's 
challenges, is the central theme 
of this easy read. 

But this book is not easy to 
put down. Here's a little lineup 
preview from the athletes 
featured in Slam Dunk. At 
guard: Kevin Johnson and Pete 
Maravich. At forward: Julius 
Erving and A.C. Green. And in 
the middle: David Robinson, 
Nice team, huh? 

Other players covered in the 
book include NBA shot-block- 
ing-machine Mark Eaton, who 
describes how he overcame 
being self-conscious about his 
size (he's 7-foot-4); Clark 
Kellogg, a former player who 
suffered severe knee injury and 
saw his sparkling career end 
prematurely; and Mark Price, a 
smallish Ail-Star guard who has 
mastered self-discipline and a 
rigid work ethic to reach the 
heights of the NBA. 

Slam Dunk, written by Dave 
Branon is fun stuff that will have 
a positive impact on readers of 
all ages. 



14 



BOOKS 



The Brethren Adult Series for 
December, January, and February features: 




Some of the chapters included in this 
fascinating study : 

•Angels: Who are they? 

•The Angels and You 

•The Devil and his Fingerprints 

• How to Defeat the Devil 

•What about Life After Death? 



About the Author: 
Dr. Bernard N. Schneider (1906- 
1983) was a pastor for more than 
thirty years of Grace Brethren 
Churches and served as the 
Moderator for the Fellowship 
twice. He received both his M.Div. 
and D.D. degrees from Grace 
Theological Seminary. 



With every order of 
$100 or more you 
will receive a free 

copy of: 
Discovering Prayer 

by 
Andrew Knowles 




Please send 



_copies of The World of Unseen Spirits at $5.95 each 



Pj Yes, my order totals $100 or more — please indude my free copy of Discovering Prayer 
Ship to: Bill to: 



Shipping: $2.00 for single copy, 
multiple copies: you pay only 
the actual shipping costs. 



The Brethren Missionary Herald Company 
P.O.Box 544 • Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Toll-Free 1-800-348-2756 
15 



December 1994 



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cHEIQLD 16 



NEWS 



In September, CE National 
was in the North Atlantic 
District for "An Evening with 
CE National" at the Good 'n' 
Plenty Restaurant in 
Smoketown, PA. Several 
hundred people attended this 
informational evening to learn 
about CE National's various 
ministries. CE National is 
grateful to Chris and Dolly 
Lapp, (shown in the picture to 
the right) faithful and generous 
CE supporters, who donated 
the food and their restaurant's 
services for the special evening 

Pastor Ralph Colburn, Grace 
Church at Cypress, CA, had a 
heart valve replacement surgery 
on November 4. Pray for his 
complete recovery and drop 
him a card of encouragement. 

Dr. Luke E. Kauff man, 

Senior Pastor at Anchorage 
GBC, Anchorage, AK, recently 
concluded a sixteen-day minis- 
try trip to Magadam, Russia, 
where he taught Bible students 
at St. James Bible College. 

Magadam is a city of 160,000 
residents located due north of 
Japan in what was once Siberia. 
Luke reports that he was emo- 
tionally unprepared both for the 
outpouring of love by new 
converts in Christ while at the 
same time being in constant 
pain over the toll which the 
death houses had taken on the 
people of the defunct Soviet 
Union. All of his students have 
become Christians since the 
August, 1991 coup. 

He will be taking two trips 
with his wife, Sandy, during 
December, sharing his mission 
trip via colored slides to the 
"lower 48." 




Chris and Dolly Lapp 

Arnold Kriegbaum and 
Laura have been interim pastor 
for the last six months at Ocala, 
FL, with three services on 
Sunday plus a Wednesday 
morning Bible study. They are 
rejoicing that Ron and Susan 
Smals have arrived as their new 
pastor. 

Charis 1994, October 3-8, 
Chateau de St. Albain. During 
these historic days, representa- 
tives of GB Churches from 
thirteen different countries met 
to encourage one another, learn 
how God is working, and 
explore ways that GBC around 
the world can help each other in 
their efforts to make disciples of 
all nations. This international 
gathering brought a diverse 
group together from: Argentina, 
Brazil, Cambodia, Central 
African Republic, Chad, En- 



gland, France, Guatemala, 
Germany, Japan, Mexico, 
Philippines, USA. 

The Southwest GBC of 
Grove City, OH, dedicated 
their new building Sunday, 
October 16. The church began 
in 1977 under the leadership of 
Quentin Matthis. Tony Webb 
came in 1991 and led them in 
their building project. Con- 
gratulations to Tony and to the 
people of Southwest GBC. 

The Sebring GBC in 
Sebring, FL, is pleased to 
announce the appointment of 
David Ogden as youth pastor. 
David and his wife Pam have 
been members at Sebring since 
1988 and have been coordinat- 
ing youth activities at the church 
for the past several years. 

David is a graduate of both 
Grace College and Seminary. 
The church looks for God's 
blessing in this couple's future 
ministry. Senior Pastor is Glenn 
Rininger. 

"We are meeting many 
people and making friends," 
writes Nathan Leigh from 
Manila, Philippines. "The Lord 
allowed me to become well 
known very quickly by allowing 
me to win a bowling tourna- 
ment. Many of the bowlers came 
and introduced themselves to 
me. As a result, several couples 
have really opened up to Dee 
and me. Butch and Malou 
invited us to their house for 
lunch and would not let us leave 
until after dinner. We are thank- 
ful for these friends the Lord is 
bringing our way, and we are 
hoping to share the love of 
Christ with them." 



17 



December 1994 



NEWS 



The following men were 
elected to the Board of the 
Brethren Missionary Herald for 
a three-year term ending in 
1977: Pastors Larry Gegner, H. 
Don Rough, and Jeff Thornley 
and attorney Pat Phillips from 
Columbus, OH. 

Congratulations to Dr. 
Ronald Manahan who was 

installed as the fifth president of 
Grace Schools. Marilyn Quayle 
was the guest speaker (see our 
interview with her on page 7) 
and a luncheon followed the 
inauguration. It was a wonder- 
ful day for Grace Schools. 

The Missions Committee of 
the Association of Churches in 

Chad is choosing the first mis- 
sionary to be sent out under the 
SAM (Sending an African 
Missionary) program to an 
unreached village this fall. 

Pastor Warren Tamkin has 

resigned his ministry at Hope 
GBC in Dillsburg, PA. He plans 
to retire in the area and will 
spend part of the year in Port 
Richey, FL. 

The mobile home park there 
adjoins the GBC where Rev. Jim 
Poyner serves. The owner of the 
park is an elder in the church 
and asked that Warren teach the 
Bible study (a group that usually 
numbers over 100) which meets 
weekly at the recreation center. 

"We look joyfully and expect- 
antly for God to bless in the 
exciting days which lie ahead," 
says Pastor Tamkin. 



William E. Shaffer, known as 
Pastor Bill in Kenai, AK, 90 
years of age, had a cancerous 
skin lesion removed recently. It 
required twenty-six stitches to 
close the wound. For a few 
weeks he will have to give up 
his twice weekly diving and 
swimming with the polar bears. 

Pastor Bill is the surviving 
member of the committee that 
organized Grace Seminary. 
Although legally blind, he has 
written over six-hundred Daily 
Devotions and two books. He 
has been preaching for 69 years 
and is a retired Chaplain with 
the rank of Lt. Col. with the U.S. 
Air Force Auxiliary. 




Pastoral 
Positions 

Harrah, WA 

The Harrah GBC, of 
Harrah, Washington, is 
accepting resumes for 
pastoral candidates. 
Send resumes to: 

Mr. Jack Labbee 

P.O. Box 130 

Harrah, WA 98933 



Dillsburg, PA 

Hope GBC of Dillsburg, 
PA is accepting resumes 
for pastoral candidates at 
this address: 

Pastoral Search Committee 
Hope GBC 
P.O. Box 275 
Dillsburg, PA 17019 





William E. Shaffer 



IN MEMORY 

Mary Bry, 91, of Akron, 
OH died September 26th 
after a lengthy illness. 

Mary is the mother of 
Nancy Placeway. She was a 
pastor's wife and former 
national president of the 
WMC Mary faithfully 
served the Lord in the Ellet 
GBC, teaching Sunday 
School classes, singing in the 
choir and for forty-five years 
was secretary of the church. 

Her memorial service 
was conducted by Pastor 
Richard Placeway, her son- 
in-law and Pastor of Ellet 
GBC, and Pastor John Snow. 



C HEI^\LD 



18 



LICJJhLIS 



Like the woman of Proverbs 31, we bless others with our service and capable strength 

which grow out of obedience. Through the long nights, our lights do not go out. 

We hope the personal experiences and lessons shared by the women of our fellowship 

will encourage you and stretch your boundaries of faith. 



Changing Seasons 

By Florence Lesh 



"Bless the Lord, O my soul, bless His 
Holy name. Bless the Lord,0 my 
soul, and forget not all His benefits. " 



After the noisy, active day of 
caring for two grandchildren, 
Jared who is four and Lauren, 
his two-year old sister, the house 
seems very quiet. You know, it 
feels like they should be our 
children, not our grandchildren. 

How quickly the seasons of 
life change. 

Each decade or phase of my 
life has been a learning experi- 
ence. Living now in the "Senior 
Saint Season" is no exception. 
These years have had many 
rewards but they are also filled 
with deep responsibilities and 
tough challenges. In the midst of 
it all, I have experienced the 
added uncertainty of difficult 
health problems. 

But, sweet blessings have 
come as God has introduced me 
to and positioned me in the 
center of my new ministry focus: 
PRAYER. 

First let me remind us all that 
prayer is more than just a nice 
thing to do. It is a command 
from God. "Pray without ceas- 
ing," he tells us. And as in so 
many cases, obeying God in this 
one will bring blessings. 

When I was in the middle of 
the especially difficult times of 
sickness, I know that God gave 
me strength and peace when I 




Lamplight 
Chronicles 

"Her lamp does not go out at night" 



chose to spend time with Him in 
prayer. He taught me to praise 
Him, which must come first. 

During the months of shut-in 
days, I was overwhelmingly 
showered with notes and cards 
of love and encouragement sent 
by friends and family members. 
From a list of everyone who so 
thoughtfully remembered me, I 
created a thirty-day prayer 
book. I included a few names 
and a scripture verse on each 
page. Then, every day of the 



month I would pray for the ones 
whose names were written 
down. They had carried my 
needs in prayer and though 
physically weak, I could do the 
same for them. 

Since I couldn't leave my 
home, I learned that the tele- 
phone is a great way to "get 
together with a friend" and 
pray. We would often share a 
verse and then pray. We even 
sang some of our favorite hymns 
as impromptu duets. 

But, even in the changing 
seasons of life, when the chil- 
dren are grown and my respon- 
sibilities readjust, or when 
illness gives me plenty of "free 
time" it is still a constant disci- 
pline to set aside time to pray. 

I bebeve firmly in the state- 
ment "Your attitude toward 
prayer reveals your attitude 
toward God." 

There is a verse in Psalm 71 
that talks about the closing 
seasons of life and my prayer is 
verse 17 and 18. "Since my 
youth, O God, you have taught 
me, and to this day I declare 
your marvelous deeds. Even 
when I am old and gray, do not 
forsake me, O God, till I declare 
your power to the next genera- 
tion, your might to all who are 
to come." 

Prayer does not fit us for 
greater work, prayer is the 
greater work — whatever season 
you are in. 

Florence is a member of the Waterloo, Iowa GBC. 



19 



December 1994 



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BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD 

P.O. Box 544 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Address Correction Requested 



Nonprofit Org. 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Winona Lake, IN 
Permit No. 13 






1995 GRACE BRETHREN ANNUAL 




Pray that 

100 churches will 

commit to become 

Focus 2000 

Churches! 



■ 



Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches 

NEXT CONFERENCE: July 22-27, 1995 at Town & Country Hotel, San Diego, CA 

NATIONAL BUSINESS OFFICES: Winona Lake, IN 46590 (except where noted) 

FELLOWSHIP COORDINATOR: Charles Ashman, P.O. Box 386, Winona Lake.lN 

219/269-1269, FAX 219/267-4745 

BRETHREN EVANGELISTIC MINISTRIES (3580 Robin Hood Circle, Roanoke, VA 24019) 
Ron Thompson, 3580 Robin Hood Circle, Roanoke, VA 24019, Phone 703/992-6595 
All Gifts to: P.O. Box 333, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD COMPANY (P.O. Box 544) 219/267-7158 

Toll-Free For Orders 1-800-348-2756 Jeff Carroll (Res.) 268-0177 

FAX 219-267-4745 Jo Disbro (Res.) 267-2685 

HERALD NEWSLINE: 219-267-7826 

BRETHREN WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres.: Mrs. Geneva Inman, 2244 Fernwood Dr., Colorado Spnngs, CO 86910 719/597-2620 

Fin. Secy.: Miss Joyce Ashman, 602 Chestnut. Winona Lake, IN 46590 219/267-7588 

CE NATIONAL (P.O. Box 365) 219/267-6622 

Ed Lewis (Res.) 267-3928 Cherry Otermat (Res.) 269-7210 

Jesse DeBoest (Res.) 269-6640 FAX 219/269-7185 

Mike Sessler (Off.) 216/296-7181 E-Mail cenational 

GRACE BRETHREN FINANCIAL PLANNING SERVICE (P.O. Box 587) 219/267-5161 

Russel Dunlap (Res.) 269-3477 Ronald Dorner 800/422-4663. ext. 19 

GRACE BRETHREN FOREIGN MISSIONS (P.O. Box 588) 219/267-5161 

Tom Julien (Res.) 269-3874 Steve Popenfoose (Res.) 269-1225 

Greg Weimer (Res.) 267-8746 Jay Bell (Res.) 268-0445 

Gordon Austin (Res.) 269-2507 Missionary Residence 269-4657 

GRACE BRETHREN HOME MISSIONS (P.O. Box 587) 219/267-5161 

Larry Chamberlain (Res.) 269-1394 Kurt Miller (Res.) 268-1798 

Jesse B. Deloe (Res.) 269-7925 William Snell (Res.) 269-5647 

Brenda Kent (Res.) 267-7912 Kirk Heng (Res.) 267-5961 

David Marksbury (Res.) 714/379-0799 FAX 219/269-4066 

(Office) 714/895-6393 

GRACE BRETHREN NAVAJO MINISTRIES Counselor, NM 87018 505/568-4454 

Stephen Galegor, director 

GRACE BRETHREN INVESTMENT FOUNDATION (P.O. Box 587) 219/267-5161 

Larry N. Chamberlain (Res.) 269-1394 James W Johnson (Res.) 269-71 19 

GRACE BRETHREN MEN INTERNATIONAL (Office phone: 614/888-7733) 
6675 Worthington-Galena Rd„ Worthinglon, OH 43085 
Yokefellow Ministries 614/848-9994 (Res.) 

GRACE BRETHREN BOYS- Roger Mills 614/861-5810 (Res.) 

GRACE SCHOOLS (200 Seminary Drive) 219/372-5100: FAX 219/372-5265 

Ronald Manahan (Res.) 269-3478 Carl Beridon (Res.) 267-1775 

David Plaster (Res.) 269-9625 Jim Shipley (Res.) 267-4302 

William Darr (Res.) 267-4731 Kathryn Scanland (Res.) 268-2781 

GRACE VILLAGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY (P.O. Box 337) 219/372-6200 

Rick Stittney 372-6200 Carol A Schuler (Res.) 269-9869 

NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN MINISTERS 

President: John Teevan, 1200 Kings Highway 219/267-6623 

Exec. Secy,: Rev. Ralph Colburn, 3490 LaJara St., Long Beach. CA 90805 310/630-2122 



1995 

GRACE 

BRETHREN 

ANNUAL 



CONTAINING: 

THE MODERATORS ADDRESS AND MINUTES 

OF THE 

55TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 

OF THE 

FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES 

HELD JULY 23- JULY 28, 1994 

THE GRENELEFE RESORT - HAINES CITY, FLORIDA 



December 1994 

Published by 

THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY HERALD CO. 

Jeff Carroll, Publisher and General Manager 

P.O. BOX 544 / WINONA LAKE, INDIANA 46590 



Table of Contents 



NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 

Churches, Directory of Brethren 65 

Districts, Directory of 46 

Ministers, Roster of 81 

Minutes of 1992 National Fellowship- 
Business Sessions 10 

Moderator's Address 5 

Organization and Committees 3 

Statistical Report 13 

E-Mail Directory 109 

COOPERATING NATIONAL 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 37 

Brethren Missionary Herald Company 31 

Brethren Women's Missionary Council 32 

CE National 40 

Grace Brethren Foreign Missions 20 

Grace Brethren Home Missions Council 27 

Grace Brethren Investment Foundation 30 

Grace Brethren Financial Planning Service 31 

Grace Brethren Men International 36 

Grace Schools 38 

National Fellowship of Brethren Retirement 

Homes, Inc 37 

National Fellowship of Grace Brethren Ministers . .41 
SMM 35 

COOPERATING DISTRICT 
CONFERENCES 

Allegheny 48 

Arctic 49 

Chesapeake 49 

East Central Florida 49 

Florida Suncoast 50 

Great Lakes 51 

Hawaii 51 

Indiana 51 

Iowa-Midlands 52 

Mid-Atlantic 53 

Mountain -Plains 54 

Nor-Cal 54 

Northcentral Ohio 54 

Northeastern Ohio 55 

Northern Atlantic 56 

Northwest 57 

South Florida-Caribbean 58 

Southern 59 

Southern California-Arizona 59 

Southern Ohio 60 

Southwest 61 

Virginia 61 

Western Pennsylvania 62 



Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches 



OFFICERS 

Moderator - Edward A. Lewis 

First Moderator-Elect - Stephen Peters 

Second Moderator-Elect - John Mcintosh 

Secretary - Gregory M. Howell 

Treasurer - Steve Popenfoose 

FELLOWSHIP COORDINATOR 

Charles Ashman 



FELLOWSHIP COUNCIL 



CONFERENCE MODERATORS 

(Ex Officio) 

Moderator ('94-'95) 
Edward A. Lewis 

First Moderator-Elect, ('95-96) 
Stephen Peters 

Second Moderator-Elect, ('96-'97) 
John Mcintosh 

Past Moderator ('93-'94) 
Robert Fetterhoff 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Dan Thornton ('95), Chm. 
Scott Massey ('95) 
Terrance Taylor ('96) 
Richard Todd ('96) 
Jeff Dunkle ('97) 
Randy Weekley ('97) 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Bickel 
Don Eshelman 
Tad Hobert 
Daniel Pacheco 
Jack Peters, Jr. 
Steve Taylor 

PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEE 

Mike Wallace ('95), Chm. 
Norman Mayer ('96) 
Tom Avey ('97) 



REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
Dan Eshleman ('95), Eastern 
David Kennedy ('96), Eastern 
Wayne Hannah (97), Eastern 
Kenneth Koontz, (98), Eastern 
Bud Olszewski ('95), Central 
Robert Divine ('96), Central 
Robert Foote ('97), Central 
Scott Miles ('98), Central 
Ed Trenner ('95), Western 
Chris Ball (96), Western 
Steve Galegor ('97), Western 
Philip Teran ('98), Western 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

STRATEGY COMMITTEE 

Robert Fetterhoff ('94), Chm. 

Kurt Miller/Wayne Hannah ('95) 

Dan Thornton ('96) 

Ed Trenner (Consultant) 

Ed Lewis (Ex Officio) 

Steve Peters (Ex Officio) 

John Mcintosh (Ex Officio) 

SOCIAL CONCERNS COMMITTEE 

Donald Shoemaker, Chm. 
Ron Cohen 
Bob Fetterhoff 
Russell Ogden 
John Teevan 

RETIREMENT PLANNING COMMITTEE 

James Johnson, Chm. 
Bill Burby 
James Custer 
Dewey Melton 
Reed DePace 



APPOINTMENTS 



F.G.B.C. CHAPLAIN ENDORSING 

Chaplain Lee Jenkins (Until July 1995) 
Chaplain John Schumacher (After July 1995) 



PASTORAL CONNECTIONS 

Greg Howell 



boarii o?Z S re9 !| rdm ? * he national organizations and cooperating 
section 2 *?. Fe,,ow » h| P of g ™* Brethren Churches please refer to the 
sect.cn of this annual entiled "National Organizations" beginning on page 



PAST MODERATORS 

1940-CharlesH. Ashman, Sr * 
1941-L. S. Bauman* 
1942-Roy Patterson* 
1943-Herman A. Hoyt 
1944-Russell D. Barnard* 
1945-Kenneth Ashman* 
1 946-Bemard Schneider* 
1947-W. A. Ogden* 
1948-Paul Bauman 
1949-MilesTaber* 
1950-Conard Sandy* 
1951-Orville Jobson* 
1952-Arnold Kriegbaum 
1953-J. L. Gingrich* 
1954-R. Paul Miller, Sr.* 

1955-Thomas Hammers* 

1956-Bemard Schneider* 

1957-MilesTaber* 

1958-Paui Dick 

1959-Harold Etling* 

1960-RalphColbum 

1961 -John Aeby 

1962-MarkMalles 

1963-Kenneth Ashman* 

1964-L. L. Grubb* 

1965- Richard Grant 

1966-Glenn O'Neal* 

1967-HomerA. Kent, Sr.* 

1968-Russell D. Barnard* 



1 969-Wesley Haller* 

1 970-William Tweeddale 

1971 -Robert Collitt* 

1972-Wayne Beaver 

1973-Charles Ashman 

1974-Scott Weaver 

1975-Charles Turner 

1976-Robert W. Thompson* 

1977-James Custer 

1978-David Hocking 

1 979-Jesse Deloe 

1 980-Knute Larson 

1 981 -Luke Kauffman 

1982-Homer A. Kent, Jr. 

1983-Edwin Cashman 

1984-Lester E. Piter 
1985-John Mayes 
1986-Tom Julien 
1987-Dean Fetterhoft 
1988-John Davis 
1989-Roger Peugh 
1990-Jerry Young 
1991 -David Plaster 
1992-William Snell 
1 993-Robert Fetterhoff 

Year listed denotes the year in which 

the person was selected as 

moderator. 

f* Denotes deceased. J 



A VISION FOR THE FGBC" 



A Message Presented by Robert D. Fetterhoff 

Moderator ot the FGBC 

July 24, 1994 



Good morning! You may have noticed by 
iow that many of the attractions of this area 
lave used the word "world" to describe 
hemselves. This area has boasted not only 
3isney World and Sea World, but also Flea 
World, Bargain World, Camping World, and even 
i Baptist church in Orlando with several 
housand members known as "Baptist World," 

For this week, the Grenelefe Resort of 
Haines City, Florida becomes Grace Brethren 
World. Our week has been restructured to 
jromote spiritual challenge and personal 
-efreshment. My prayer is that in this area of the 
Vlagic Kingdom, you'll get a glimpse of the 
supernatural kingdom that God is building in the 
hearts of His people around the world. 

I'm told that soon after the completion of 
Disney World, someone said, "Isn't it too bad 
that Walt Disney didn't live to see this - '" Mike 
Vance, the Creative Director of Disney Studios 
replied. "He did see it - that's why it's here." 

1 believe we're here this week because our 
past leaders saw a movement that could touch 
the world for the glory of God. I recently 
reviewed the names of men who served as 
Moderator of our Fellowship before I was ever 
born . . . men like L.S. Bauman, Russell 
Barnard, Bernie Schneider, Orville Jobson, 
Arnold Knegbaum, and R. Paul Miller. Some of 
you know these names very well. They were 
men of great vision . But I wonder if some of 
that vision has been lost. 

Many years ago, Helen-Keller was asked, 
"What could be worse than being blind - '" She 
thought for a moment and then said, 
Having sight - but no vision!" 
I fear that may have described our 
Fellowship for the last decade. Is it possible 
we've been looking for the "speck of sawdust in 
our brother's eye and paying no attention to the 
plank in our own eye''" (Matt. 7:3) 
Dr. Kenneth Hilderbrand wrote, 
"Recently a friend referred to a person as a 
'mundane man'. The phrase intrigued me 
and sent me thinking. The mundane man, 
as I view it, is the man who believes only 
what he sees, only what is immediate, only 
what he can put his hands on. He may be 
a truck driver, a banker, a college president, 



a clerk, or a junk dealer - his occupation 

doesn't matter. The mundane man lacks 

depth. He lacks vision. The poorest of all 

men Is not the one without a nickel to his 

name. He's the fellow without a dream." 

In recent years, we've spent much time 

studying who we are - seeing again what we 

believe. We've reaffirmed our commitment to be 

true to the Word of God at all costs. But I agree 

with George Barna who said, 

"Encouraging people to pledge themselves 
merely to survival is an admission of defeat." 

I believe you're here because you're not 
ready just to survive. I believe you've come to 
this Conference expecting God to give you a 
new vision of what He wants to do in your life 
and through the Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches. 

You see, the Bible is filled with reminders of 
the need for a vision of what God can do with 
us. Isaiah got a vision of the holiness of God 
and said, "Here am I, Lord, send me." 

John Maxwell said it like this: 
"When Alexander the Great had a vision, he 
conquered the world. When he lost that 
vision, he couldn't even conquer the liquor 
bottle. When David had a vision, he 
conquered Goliath. When he lost his vision, 
he couldn't conquer his own lust. When 
Samson had a vision, he won many battles. 
When he lost his vision, he couldn't win his 
battle with Delilah. When Solomon had a 
vision, he was the wisest man in the world. 
But when he lost that vision, he couldn't 
control his own passions for strange women. 
When Elijah had a vision, he could pray 
down fire from heaven and chop off the 
heads of false prophets. Without a vision, 
he ran from Jezebel. When Peter had a 
vision of what God could do, he preached at 
Pentecost and 3,000 were saved. When he 
lost that vision, he was afraid to admit that 
he was one of the Lords in front of a little 
girl. 

One of the most graphic stories about vision 
in the Bible is recorded in the 13th chapter of 



Numbers. Moses commissioned 12 spies to 
examine the Promised Land. In fact, Moses 
said to these spies: "See what the land is like 
and whether the people who live there are 
strong or weak, few or many" (Numbers 13:18). 

Moses wanted them to get a vision of what 
it would be like to live there. He asked them to 
look at the cities, the soil and the fruit. You 
know what happened. When the spies went into 
the land, they only saw the problems. In fact, 
they said, "The people who live there are 
powerful, and the cities are fortified and very 
large" (vs. 28). In verse 31 they said, "We can't 
attack those people; they are stronger than we 
are. And they spread among the Israelites a 
bad report about the land they'd explored." 

I think there were three simple reasons why 
these spies lacked vision for the Promised Land. 

Reason #1: They failed to acknowledge 
Gods presence. 

Even though God said, "I will be with you," even 
though He led the people for years through the 
wilderness with the cloud during the day and fire 
at night . these spies forgot all about Gods 
presence. 



The first is . . . 

1B. Myopia (Near-sightedness) 

I remember looking across the room when 
was in 8th grade and being unable to read the 
newspaper headlines. I had to move closer tci 
the front of the classroom in order to read the 
chalkboard. I began to realize that I could only! 
see clearly what was close to me. My parents) 
took me to the doctor for an eye exam and he* 
prescribed glasses to correct my near-! 
sightedness. 

Isn't that how Jesus spent much of His timei 
here on earth? The Pharisees questioned Hisft 
authority to forgive sins, so He corrected their 
Vision by healing the paralytic. They cnticized': 
Him for doing work on the Sabbath when he> 
wanted them to see that the kingdom of heaven 
was at hand. Even with His disciples Jesus : 
said, "Open your eyes and look out at the fields! I 
They are ripe for harvest" (John 4:35). 

Over a hundred years ago, Dr. Livingston 
read the words of Robert Moffitt concerning 
Africa: 

"From where I stand, I can see the smoke of 

10,000 villages that have never heard of 

Christ." 



Reason #2: They also failed to appropriate 
God's power. 

All they could talk about was how big the giants 
were in the Promised Land. They forgot all 
about how God delivered them miraculously 
from the presence of Pharaoh himself. 

Reason #3: They failed to act on God's 
plan. 

God wanted them to take possession of the 
land, but they refused to do it. They disobeyed 
the will of God. 

Now let me ask you a question: What 
keeps us from having vision as a Fellowship'' 
What keeps us from obeying what God wants for 
us as a Fellowship of churches'' I want to 
suggest there are . . . 



That day, a dream was born in David ; 
Livingston's heart. He traced the Zambezi River 
to its source and travelled 11,000 miles on foot 
in unchartered jungle. To spread God's Word, 
he suffered unbelievable hardships, was: 
attacked by savage beasts, and nearly killed. 
His dedication won the heart of the black man. 

He was fired to deep anger by the cruelty of 
the slave trade and became determined to crush 
what he called the open sore of the world.' In 
his later years, Livingston was racked by ; 
disease, attacked by wild animals and often 
menaced by hostile tribes. 

Henry Stanley reported that not one man in I 
a million would ever push forward as he did. He j 
pressed on until his body could go no farther. I 
On May 1, 1883, he was found dead on his 
knees in a position of prayer in a crude hut in an 
obscure village. All because David Livingston | 
had a dream. 



1A. TWO OBSTACLES TO OUR VISION 

Someone simply said: "Obstacles are those 
frightful things you see when you take your eyes 
off the goal." Because we have taken our eyes 
off the goal of what God wants us to do as a 
Fellowship of churches, two obstacles have 
become especially evident among us. 

6 



David Livingston was someone that Chuck 
Swindoll would call an "eagle thinker." In his 
book, Come Before Winter, Swindoll writes, 

"We are running shy of eagles and are 
running over with parrots. We are fast becoming 
over-populated with bright-colored birds having 
soft bellies, big beaks and little heads. What 
would help to balance things out would be a lot 



more keen-eyed, wide-winged creatures willing 
to soar out and up, exploring the limitless ranges 
of the Kingdom of God . . . 

Parrot people are much different than eagle 
thinkers. They like to stay in the same 
cage, pick over the same handful of seeds, 
and listen to the same words over and over 
again until they can say them with ease ... 
You and I can't remember the last time we 
saw one fly. Parrots like the predictable, the 
secure, the strokes they get from their 
mutual admiration society. 

Not the eagles. There's not a predictable 
pinion in their wings 1 They think. They love 
to think. They are driven with this inner 
surge to search, to discover, to learn. And 
that means they're courageous, tough- 
minded, willing to ask the hard questions as 
they bypass the routine in vigorous pursuit 
of the truth.' 

Science tells us that an eagle has 8 times 
more visual cells per cubic centimeter than a 
human being. At 600 feet, an eagle can see an 
object the size of a dime in the grass. An eagle 
is anything but near-sighted. 

What kind of person are you? Are you a 
parrot or an eagle? Are you focused only on 
whats immediate'' Or have you lifted up your 
eyes and looked at the incredible harvest that 
God has already prepared all around the world 
for His glory?! 

Listen my friend, we'll never be people of 
vision as long as we pick over the same panful 
of seeds and listen to the same words over and 
over again. We need to encourage eagle 
thinkers who refuse to settle for a small dish of 
picked over theological seeds. We need to 
encourage eagles who will soar and explore the 
power of God in our world like never before. 

The first obstacle to our vision is myopia. 
The second obstacle to our vision is . . . 

1C. Fear 

Remember the story recorded in Matthew 1 4 
where Jesus walked on the water 9 The 
disciples thought he was a ghost. But Jesus 
invited Peter to walk toward Him on the water. 
So Peter got out of the boat and began walking 
on the water toward Jesus. What does the Bible 
say? 

"But when he saw the wind, he was afraid, 

and beginning to sink, cried out, 'Lord, save 

me!" (Matt, 14:30). 



You see, when Peter was gripped by fear, he 
got his eyes off what Christ could do in his life. 
When we allow the fear of the unknown or the 
fear of change or the fear of growth to control 
us, we'll lose our vision. 

You probably know about Wally Amos 
through his "Famous Amos" chocolate chip 
cookies. Wally Amos' company grew from a 
one-man business in 1975 to an $80 million 
success story. But, by the mid 1980's, reality 
caught up. The company began to experience 
a cash-flow crunch. Then he made a deadly 
mistake. Listen to what he says, 

"When I reached the point where I was on 
the verge of losing the company, I started 
acting out of fear. When you do that, you're 
not acting from your center. Fear clouds 
your vision. You can't see clearly." 
Eventually, he lost his company, all because fear 
gained control of his life. 

How many times did Jesus say to his 
followers, 

"Don't be afraid." 
"Don't let your heart be troubled." 
"Fear not!"? 
When we're controlled by fear, our vision will be 
impaired. 



So now what is our collective vision right 
now? What evidence is there that we're asking 
God to do great things through our Fellowship in 
the years ahead 7 

Let me move now to some . . . 

2A. OBSERVATIONS ABOUT OUR VISION 

Now the Moderator is supposed to report on 
the spiritual state of our Fellowship and present 
challenges that are facing our churches. That 
can be about as exciting as watching paint dry. 
But I'm genuinely excited about what God is 
doing in our Fellowship. 

During the last year. I've had an opportunity 
to travel all across the country to attend several 
of the FOCUS II retreats that have been held in 
five different regions. More than 7 2 of the 
pastors of our Fellowship have attended one of 
these retreats. Let me quote from a recent letter 
from Tom Julien: 

The comments that we have received 
mentioned the Love Feasts and our Day 
With God as we prayed through the Letter 
to the Ephesians, and caught a glimpse of 
the glory of the Church. What a privilege to 
see the church from God's standpoint and 
not from the underside!" 
God has wonderfully united the hearts of pastors 
all across the nation together through these 



FOCUS retreats. We owe a special debt ot 
gratitude to the visionary men who have planned 
these retreats, sought God's direction for them 
and prayed that He would unite our hearts 
through this unique experience. God has 
answered prayerl Nothing in my memory has so 
challenged the hearts of pastors across America! 

I wish we had time to describe all the 
victories God is accomplishing through our 
churches that you may not know about. We 
could talk about the vision of Jim Snavely at 
Tiadaghton Valley Grace Brethren Church in 
Avis, PA ... or Jeff Thornley's vision at Waldorf, 
Maryland ... or Neil Cole and his "Pastor 
Factory" in Alta Loma, CA . . . or the explosive 
growth of Grace Community Church under the 
leadership of Brian Chronister in Anchorage, 
Alaska ... or the flagship ministry of Grace 
Brethren Church of Columbus, OH. 

Sure, there are struggles and difficulties and 
heartaches in our churches, but God is doing a 
new work all across our Fellowship. 

Do you know that hundreds of young people 
in our churches made commitments to sexual 
purity until marriage this year as a part of the 
"True Love Waits' campaign' 

Do you know that attendance at Brethren 
National Youth Conference will reach nearly 
2000 next week? 

Do you know that 240 people made first time 
decisions for Jesus Christ because of the 
ministry of Grace Brethren Home Mission 
churches this year' 

Do you know that deposits at the Grace Brethren 
Investment Foundation have soared to 35 V a 
million dollars? 

Do you realize that Grace Seminary has 
received a warm response to its creative 
approach to training students for ministry 
leadership? 

Do you know that WMC has made a new 
commitment for prayer for world evangelization 
in each one of our congregations? 

Are you aware of how God has opened the door 
for ministries by Grace Brethren missionaries in 
places like the Czech Republic, western Siberia, 
and Cambodia? 

Do you realize that Steve Galegor has a passion 
to see not just one or two or ten or twenty 
Navajo churches planted, but 100 churches 
established that will proclaim the Gospel among 
Native Americans in the next ten years? 

Do you realize how close we are to having the 
first Grace Brethren Church in Canada? 



Do you realize there's new vision in the 
leadership of Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 
and Grace Village? 

Are you aware of the wonderful materials made 
available through the Herald Company? 

Perhaps only a few of us realize that the men's 
ministry called Yokefellows has saved our 
churches $800,000 through selfless sacrifice! 

God is doing something new across our 
Fellowship! Our eyes are being lifted! The 
fields are white to harvest! 

But, my friend, this is no place to stop. The 
doors around the world are swinging open like 
never before in the history of the church. All 
around the world there are some marvelous . . . 

3A. OPPORTUNITIES FOR VISION 

Do you realize what God is doing around 
the world? Do you know that on June 25th of 
this year, an estimated 160 million Christians 
across the globe prayed that God would change 
the world? 

Did you realize that 12 million believers from 178 
nations celebrated the first global March for 
Jesus? 

What about the dream to have 1 million Promise 
Keepers descend on Washington D.C. to declare 
their allegiance to Christ and their families? 

What about the 1 million young people who are 
pledging themselves to sexual purity until 
marriage? 

Did you know there are only 50 nations on earth 
left to be reached with the ministry of 
Evangelism Explosion? 

Did you realize there is a concerted effort to 
blanket the world through radio and television 
with the Gospel of Jesus Christ 9 
God is doing something significant in this world 
as we approach the year 2000! 

In December of last year, I had an 
opportunity to sit with leaders of evangelical 
mission agencies and para-church organizations 
to discuss what God is doing around the world. 
The "AD 2000 And Beyond" movement is a 
desire to share information in order to 
evangelize the world by the year 2000. In fact, 
there's a growing passion to establish a church 
for every people and proclaim the Gospel to 
every person by the year 2000. 

Let's make sure we're doing everything 
possible to ride the crest of the work of His Spirit 
among the peoples of the world. Let's get our 
eyes up and see the fields that are already white 
to harvest! 



Will you become excited about what God 
can do through our churches to impact the 
world?! Or will you recoil in fear or near- 
sightedness and merely pledge yourself to 
survive? 

Recently, I heard about two prisoners in one 
small cell with no light except what came 
through a tiny window three feet above eye 
level. Both prisoners spent a great deal of time 
looking at the window. One of them saw the 
bars - ugly reminders of reality. From day to 
day, he grew more bitter, angry and hopeless. 
By contrast, the other prisoner looked through 
the window to the stars beyond. Hope welled up 
inside that prisoner as he began to think of the 
possibility of starting a new life of freedom. 

The prisoners were looking at the same 
window, but one saw bars while the other saw 
stars. And the difference in their "vision" made 
the difference in their lives. 

What do you see? Do you see the 
possibilities ... and the potential ... and the 
power of God'' Or do you see the problems ... 
and the pressures . . . and the pain? 

I like the words of Robert Kennedy who said 
years ago, 

"Some people look at the way things are 
and ask why; others look at the way things 
could be and ask why not?" 

With that in mind, let me offer two 
recommendations that will help all of us ask, 
"Why nof" for the glory of God. 

#1 - I recommend that the FOCUS 
retreats be continued as long as they remain a 
viable and effective tool. Let's avoid 

institutionalizing them just because they're 
effective now. Let's ask God to use future 
FOCUS retreats to unite our hearts even more 
so that we can gain fresh vision of what He 
wants us to be for His glory. 

#2 - 1 recommend we seek to implement 
throughout our Fellowship the FOCUS 2000 
Worldwide Goals. There are six of those goals 
(available in the delegate packets): 

a) To expand to 2000 
churches around the world 

b) To enlist 20,000 people in a 
prayer network for world 
evangelization 

c) To enlist a team of 350 
church-planting 
missionaries 

d) To celebrate 100,000 
conversions to Jesus Christ 

e) To establish international partnerships 
in reaching unreached people groups 

f) To establish an international 
communication network for 
reporting of progress of 
these goals. 



These are momentous goals. They demand 
God's work in us if they're to be accomplished. 
I agree with Leith Anderson who wrote: 
"There's nothing wrong with having a vision 
of winning the whole world. But the only way it's 
going to happen is if each individual turns that 
vision into action in our own sphere of 
influence." 

Can I challenge you to lift up your eyes and 
gain a glimpse of what God wants to do through 
our efforts around the world? Would you 
become personally involved in implementing 
these goals in your life and in your local church'' 

In a moment I'm going to invite you to make 
a commitment to the vision God has for us. If 
we are to accomplish these goals, we must 
personalize them. Are you willing to do that 
today? 

You've received a response form as you 
came in. You might want to look at that for a 
moment and ask God what He'd have you do. 

CONCLUSION 

My friend, as we get older our vision should 
improve. I'm told that after Michelangelo died, 
somebody found in his studio a piece of paper 
on which he had written a note to his apprentice. 
In the handwriting of his old age, the great artist 
wrote, 

"Draw, Antonio, draw, and do not waste 

time." 
That's well-founded urgency, isn't if Time slips. 
Days pass. Years fade. And life ends. What 
God gave us to do must be done while there is 
time. 

It was that sense of urgency that caused a 
missionary many years ago to be overwhelmed 
by the masses in the cities of Asia. He wrote 
this message to those back home who were 
limited in their vision: 

"Give up your small ambitions!" 
He saw a harvest that could be reached that 
exceeded anybody's imagination. 

Almost two years ago, our church in 
Wooster and other good friends were shocked 
with the tragic death of one of our students at 
Grace College. Kendra Shultzman lived a life of 
love and grace to all who knew her. She wrote 
these words which expressed her vision for life: 

"My dream is not to seek after material 
things that can burn or be taken away, but 
to seek after those things which will last 
forever: love, righteousness, holiness and 
sacrifice. My dream will take a lifetime to 
fulfill. It will not always be easy - but it will 
bring glory to God my Father, and fill my 
soul with contentment. Will you join me in 
my dream'" 

And that's the question I place before you today 
Will you join in the vision God has for us? 



Business Sessions 



Business Session I 
Saturday, July 23, 1994, 2:00 p.m. 

1. The meeting was called to order by 
Moderator, Robert Fetterhoff, who led in 
prayer. 

Moderator Bob Fetterhoff presented Dr. 
David Plaster as "Parliamentary Chariman" 
who then instructed the conference as to 
business meeting procedures 

The Secretary presented the following 
churches as the official list of FGBC churches 
List attached to original minutes 

2. A motion prevailed to adopt this list as the 
official list of FGBC churches. 

3. Membership Committee Chairman Dan 
Thornton announced that 126 churches with 
272 lay and 175 ministerial delegates for a 
total of 447 delegates were officially registered. 
4 A motion prevailed to seat these 
delegates. 

5. Secretary Greg Howell presented the 
following churches to be received as member 
churches: 

A motion prevailed to receive Grace Bible 
Fellowship, Gainesville, FL - Pastor Scoty Kerr 

A motion prevailed to receive the East 
Valley Grace Brethren Church, Gilbert, AZ - 
Pastor Mike Wallace 

A motion prevailed to receive the Grace 
Brethren Church of Town and Country, Tampa, 
FL - Pastor John llko 

A motion prevailed to receive Iglesia 
Evangelica de Los Hermanos, Mabton. WA • 
Pastor Abner Solano 

A motion prevailed to receive the Bread of 
Life Fellowship Grace Brethren Church, 
Denver, PA - Pastor Robert Kern 

A motion prevailed to receive the Hope 
Community Church, Cary, NC - Pastor, Mike 
Lee 

6. Membership Chairman Thornton made a 
report of additional delegates: 8 lay for a total 
of 276, 8 ministerial for a total of 179 with a 
combined total of 455 from 130 churches 

7 A motion prevailed to seat these 

additional members. 

8. Fellowship Coordinator Charles Ashman 

presented and moved the adoption of the 

Agenda as printed which was seconded and 

passed. 

Proposed Agenda 

Business Session I, Sat., July 23, 1994 

1. Call to Order, Moderator Robert Fetterhoff 

2. Presentation of Member Churches in the 
F.G.B.C, Conference Secretary, Greg Howell 

3. Initial report of the Membership Committee. 
Dan Thornton, Chm. 



eived 
=nda, 



4. Seating of delegates from Member Churches 

5. Presentation of New Churches to be received 
into the F.G.B.C, Fellowship Council, Robert 
Fetterhoff 

6. Additional report of the Membership 
Committee. Dan Thornton. Chm 

7. Seating of delegates from newly received 
churches. 

8. Presentation of the Proposed Agei 
Charles Ashman, Fellowship Coordinator 
9 Report of the 1994 Nominating Committee, 
Dean Fetterhoff, Chm. 

10. Election of Second Moderator-Elect and 
Fellowship Council members 

11. Report of Nominees for 1995 Conference 
Nominating Committee, Fellowship Council. 
Robert Fetterhoff. 

12. Election of the 1995 Conference Nominating 
Committee 

13 Election of new Board Members for 
Brethren Evangelistic Ministries 

14 Ratification of Appointees to the Fellowship 
Council 

15. Report of the appointment of other 
Conference Officers. Fellowship Council, Robert 
Fetterhoff 

16 Consideration for Ratification of Appointed 
Conference Officers 

17 Report of apointments to Cnoference 
Committees, Fellowship Council. Robert 
Fetterhoff 

18. Recommendation for changes in the 
F.G.B.C. Bylaws, Fellowship Council and 
Parliamentary Committee 
19 Adjournment 
BREAK 



Business Session II, Sat., July 23. 1994 

1. Call to order, Moderator, Robert Fetterhoff 

2 Approval of minutes of Business Session I 

3 Additional report from the Membership 
Committee, Dan Thornton, Chm. 

4. Report of the elections of Business Session I, 
Parliamentary Committee. Galen Wiley. Chm. 
5 Report of the F.G.B.C. Strategy Committee. 
Robert Fetterhoff, Chm 

6. Bylaw changes recommendations: Discussion 
and voting 

7. Report of the Board of Brethren Evangelistic 
Ministries. Ron Thompson, Executive Director 
8 Printed Reports - Questions of comments 
from the delegates 

a. Conference Treasurer, Steve Popenfoose 

b. Conference Statistics, Charles Ashman 
c Social Concerns, Donald Shoemaker 

d Retirement Planning, James Johnson 
e Pastoral Connections, Greg Howell 



9. Report on the Fellowship Council on its 
activities, actions and recommendations, 
Moderator, Robert Fetterhoff 

10. Report on Next Year's Conference, 
Moderator-Elect, Ed Lewis and Fellowship 
Coordinator, Charles Ashman 

11. Unfinished business 

12. New business 

13. Reading and approval of minutes of 
Business Session II 

14. Adjournment (sine die) 

The Chair requested that any new business 
please be presented in writing. 

9. Nominating Committee Chairman Dean 
Fetterhoff presented the Official Ballot and asked 
candidates to stand as he introduced them: 

Second Mod.: Wayne Hannah/ John Mcintosh 
Fellowship Council Representatives: 
Eastern: Kenneth Koontz, H. Don Rough, Jeffrey 

Thornley 
Central: Robert Foote, Richard Horner, Scott 

Miles 
Western: Luke Kauffman, David Mitchell, Philip 

Teran 

10. Parliamentary Chairman David Plaster asked 
for additional nominees for the floor and hearing 
none closed nominations. He then instructed us 
to vote for Second Moderator-elect and then only 
for one candidate in the region in which our 
district exists. 

11. Moderator Bob Fetterhoff reported the 
nominees for the Nominating Committee: Robert 
Arenobine, Kenneth Bickel, Don Eshelman, 
Randy Haulk, Tad Hobert, Clark Miller, Daniel 
Pacheco, Jack Peters, Jr., Robert Schaffer, Glen 
Shirk, Darrell Taylor, and Steve Taylor. 

12. The Parliamentary Chairman asked if 
additional names were offered to be added. 
Hearing none he declared nominations cease 
and instructed us to vote. 

13. Brethren Evangelistic Ministries President 
Lee Dice presented the BEM board nominations, 
introducing them: Ministers - Phil Guerena, Ed 
Waken, Lyle Sweeney; Laymen: Tony DeRosa, 
Bill Wilhite, Earl Dohner. The Parliamentary 
Chairman asked for nominations from the floor 
and hearing none declared nominations cease 
and instructed us to vote. 

14. Moderator/Fellowship Council Chairman Bob 
Fetterhoff moved for ratification of the following 
appointees to the Fellowship Council: 

Bob Divine and David Kennedy to fill the 
unexpired terms of Steve Peters and James 
Snavely respectively, seconded and carried. 

15/16. He also reported on the appointment of 

these Conference Officers: 
Greg Howell, Secretary 
Steve Popenfoose, Treasurer 
Lee Jenkins, Chaplain Endorsing Agent 



(until July when Col. John Schumacher will 

assume the position) 
17. The Moderator stated that reports and 
appointments of Conference Committees will be 
printed in the Annual. 

18. Fellowship Council Secretary Greg Howell 
read and moved the adoption of the by-law 
change concerning a Quorum: 

That Article IV, Section 5 be changed to read 

"A quorum shall consist of the delegates 
present, entitled to vote and voting at the 
meeting of the corporation." 
The motion was seconded. This constitutes the 
first reading. To be voted on at Business 
Session II. 

Brethren Evangelistic Ministries Executive 
Director, Ron Thompson directed attention to the 
blue pnnted report in the Conference packet. He 
also expressed thanks for support from the 
FGBC and for the resopnse to their financial 
appeal. Ron expressed that the BEM goal is to 
mobilize the laity for evangelism. He also 
introduced the new BEM President Lee Dice 
who refered to their new brochure and the 
broader direction of BEM. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF 
BRETHREN EVANGELISTIC MINISTRIES 

Dear Brethren, 

BEM has completed 46 years serving Grace 
Brethren Churches in their outreach ministry and 
we are grateful for the opportunity. God's 
sovereign hand, your faithful prayers and 
responsible stewardship have permitted us to 
continue. Even though 1993 marked our first 
financial beficit, thank you again for responding 
to our appeal. We still need the commitment of 
all the churches to permit us to expand our 
vision of encouragement to the FGBC. 

Thank you for permitting us to minister to the 
children of this conference. Their varied 
activities this week will include learning how they 
can be instruments for the Lord in helping Him to 
build His Churchl We believe everyone needs 
to be involved in the mobilization process. Since 
last conference we encouraged our churches by 
Conducting revival crusades in two 
churches, First Love Renewal seminars in 4 
churches plus a men's retreat and challenging 
18 churches through music and message. 

Cooperating with FGBC national boards 
to stimulate prayer, vision and a fresh spirit of 
teamwork through four FOCUS II retreats for 
pastors and leaders in four key regions of the 
United States. BEM will be further networking 
together to facilitate church outreach. 



Honoring Lee Dice with the Robert B 
Collitt award for evangelism. Lee, as new 
president of BEM, wants our directors to 
participate in its ministry Ed DeZago was 
appointed to fill the unexpired term of Dr. Keith 
Altig who has retired Tony DeRosa has 
completed preliminary studies in preparation for 
future international ministry. 

. . . Igniting new vision by expanding our 
ministry base to include international ministries, 
prayer, revival, clustering, training, consultation 



Disbursed To 12/31/93 65,534.52 

Balance On Hand 12/31/93 (3,931.95) 

Savings 

Balance On Hand 01/01/93 $ 10.24 

Interest 16.07 

Balance On Hand 12/31/93 26.31 



Total Assets 
On Hand 



12/31/93 (3.905.64) 



and offering helpful resources for churches. 


General 


$37,076.54 




Assistant to Director 


8,211.00 


The decade of the nineties holds many 


FLR Seminars & Crusades 


9.132.19 


challenges and opportunities for evangelism and 


Books, Manuals & Tapes 


1.903.00 


discipleship. How can we assist you in your 


Refunds, Equipment Sale 


4,782.83 


task'' 




61.105.56 


Respectively Submitted, 


Expenses 






Directors' Salary and Benefits 


$36,269.48 


Ron Thompson 


Assistant to Director 




Executive Director 


(Designated Support) 


8.211.00 




Office Salaries & Taxes 


1,458.13 




Supplies 


3,250.12 


BRETHREN EVANGELISTIC 


Print & Publication 


4,648.67 


MINISTRIES 


Telephone Service 


1,351.91 


Statement of Revenue Collected, 


Postage & Mail 


1 ,306.20 


Expenses Paid 


Piano Tape 


165.00 


and Fund Balance 


General 






FLR Seminars & Crusades 


2,769.49 


January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993 


Argentina Ministry 


2,072.19 




National Conference 


1,501.55 




Honoraria & Focus 


1,402.42 




Travel 


540.97 


Checking 


Conference & School 


462.39 


Balance On Hand 01/01/93 $ 497 01 


Rhythm Band Instruments 


125.00 


Received To 12/31/93 61,105.56 




65,534.52 



The following reports were pointed out and time for questions provided by Moderator Fetterhoff: 
Conference Treasurer, Steve Popenfoose 

THE FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1994 



Cash Balances, April 1, 1993 

Checking - Lake City Bank 

Savings - GBIF 

Total 

Cash Receipts: 

Membership Fees 
Conference Exp. Offering 
Child Care Fees 
Other (Interest, etc.) 
Conference Reg Fees 
Total Cash Receipts 



Unrestricted 


Restricted 

$ 1,073.75 


Total 


$ 8,597.13 


$ 9,670.88 


106.03 




106.03 


8,703.16 


1,073.75 


9.77691 


$ 55,476.30 


$ 35.994.20 


$ 91,470.50 


1,484.88 




1.484.88 


2,811.75 




2,811.75 


3.835.29 


1,152.93 


4,988.22 


1.970.00 




1,970.00 


65,578.22 


37,147.13 


102,725.35 



Cash Expenditures: 

Conference Expenses 
Facilities/Equip. Rental 
Child Care 

Printing and Promotion 
Conference Programming 
Personal Honoraria 
Committees and Officers 
Grace Brethren Annual 
Insurance & Legal 
Misc. 

Restricted Disbursements 
Pension Investment Plan 
Total Cash Expenditures 
Surplus (Deficit) 



Restricted 


Unrestricted 


Total 


1,310.35 




1,310.35 


6,006.95 




6,006.95 


8,176.42 




8,176.42 


3,270.90 




3,720.90 


2,600.00 




2,600.00 


28,89953 




28,899.53 


6,000.00 




6.000.00 


9,518.97 




9,518.97 


167.64 




167.64 




33,587.82 


33.587.82 




2,432.38 
36,020.29 


2,432.38 


66,400.76 


102,420.96 



(822.54) 



Cash Balances, March 31, 1994 

Checking - Lake City Bank 
Savings - BIF 

Cash Balances 



1,546.02 
6,334.60 



$7,880.62 



0.00 
2,200.68 

$2,200.68 



1546.02 
8,535.28 



$10,081.30 



Conference Statistics, Charles Ashman 



FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES 
STATISTICAL REPORT PRESENTED TO THE 1994 CONFERENCE 

Statistics Reported By Member Churches For 1993 
(Includes reports received through June 30, 1994) 



Total Number of Churches in the Fellowship: 
Total Number of Churches Reporting 
Total Number of Churches not reporting: 



286 

274 

12 



NOTE: Only those churches which have closed or officially notified the Fellowship Coordinator's 
office of their withdrawal from the FGBC have been removed from the list of member churches. 



Sunday Worship 
Attendance 



Avg. 

152 



- 1993 Figures 
Min. Max. 



Totals 

41,641 



1992 

41,016 



1991 

43,901 



Sunday School 
Attendance 



30,431 



Recorded 
Conversions 



Baptisms 
Total Members 



10 

7 

127 



162 


2,605 


2,926 


3,618 


128 


1,996 


2,360 


2,741 


2,033 


34,702 


36,220 


39,237 



Triune Immersed 
Members* 



•Nine churches had no separate record of triune immersed members available and are 
computed as zero in these figures. 

A goodly number of churches showed no record of professions of faith. 

Twenty churches reported having no Sunday School and are not computed into the averages. 

The five congregations of the Grace Brethren Church of Greater Washington. Temple Hills MD 
are reported and counted as one church 

Social Concerns, Don Shoemaker, Chm. 



REPORT OF THE 
SOCIAL CONCERNS COMMITTEE 

The prophet Micah admonished Israel to "Do 
justice, love mercy, and walk humbly" before 
God. Other prophets in Israel called the people 
to issues we consider "social concerns." Based 
on these and many other teachings in the Word 
of God, the Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches has established the Social Concerns 
Committee. 

The committee desires to help each church 
m our Fellowship develop a local Social 
Concerns Committee. We believe this is the 
single, most important strategy we can have. To 
this end, our committee (1) produces one or 
more mailings a year to update pastors on social 
concern issues, (2) has produced and revised a 
"Social Concerns Manual" to assist each 
church's interested workers, and (3) laid plans to 
target a district each year to stimulate interest in 
social concerns. 

In the above ways and also through personal 
contacts, the committee has assisted all of our 
churches, whether or not they have an active 
local committee 

In the 1980s many Christians active in social 
concerns felt that Christian values were 
marching forward in various levels of our 
government and society. Now, we may feel 
matters are in reverse. Perhaps we were too 
"heady" and optimistic in the 1980s. Perhaps 
we must labor assertively for good while 
remembering that God has not promised us 
great victory this side of the Lord's return. 

In light of the teachings of scripture and the 
moral climate of our society, the committee 
urges each church to: 

'engage in social concerns with a diligent 
and loving spirit 

•encourage lay people to be involved 
individually in community affairs 

"understand the political process at all 
levels-local, state and federal -and learn how 
to affect the process through active 
participation and communication 



"study the issues and responses 
carefully and avoid misinformation and 
responses which are legally and biblically 
questionable 

"convey to its membership the burden it 
carries for social concerns through regular 
communication and an annual Social 
Concerns Sunday 

"work with other churches and with the 
district to disseminate information and call 
for action on moral issues 

Our committee desires to be your primary 
resource for social concerns matters. Please 
utilize the literature and the skills of the 
committee members throughout the year for any 
help we can render. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Social Concerns Committee 

Donald P. Shoemaker, Chm. 
Russ Ogden 
John Teevan 
Ron Cohen 

Retirement Planning, James Johnson, Chm. 

RETIREMENT PLANNING 
COMMITTEE REPORT 

This report comes at a very busy transitional 
time, as we are transferring the retirement 
program to American United Life Insurance 
Company of Indianapolis, Indiana. We are 
greatly encouraged with our new plan carrier, as 
we have been able to add significant investment 
options. We are planning a second exciting 
phase that will offer many of these fine 
investment options in a tax deferred individual 
participation plan. 

We continue to administer the old Promise of 
Honor plan to our older retired pastors or their 
widows. We currently are issuing 36 monthly 
benefit checks totalling $3,439.21 Funds are 



needed to insure future ability to continue this 
very necessary program. These monthly 
benefits are greatly appreciated, as they help 
many on very limited incomes. Frequently, we 
receive very moving expressions of gratitude 
from these dear friends. 

Our current checking account balance (June 
14, 1994) is $423.62. We have a balance in 
savings of $75,902 78. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Mr. James W. Johnson, Chm 
Mr. William Burby 
Dr. James L. Custer 
Mr. Reed DePace 
Mr. Dewey Melton 

Pastorless Churches and Available Men, 
Greg Howell, Coordinator 

1994 PASTORLESS CHURCH/ 

AVAILABLE MEN COORDINATOR'S 

REPORT 

Many will ignore this report because it does 
not affect you. But some day when you need a 
pastor or desire to change pastorates, please 
remember that this office was created to serve 
you. Your participation will make our ministry 
effective and efficient. The system works best 
when all who are looking also list their name. 
There are two lists - one for pastors looking for 
churches and one for churches looking for 
pastors. Anyone may ask for either or both of 
these lists, though we try to maintain a degree of 
confidentiality. 

As coordinator of Pastorless Churches and 
Available Men (we need a more positive name), 
I do not actually match up pastors with 
churches. I simply act as a clearing house, 
collecting resumes of available men and passing 
them on to churches looking for pastors. You 
may contact me at (509) 773-3388 or E-Mail 
IGMHOWELL or FAX (509) 773-6243 or write 
me at 1180 S. Roosevelt, Goldendale, WA 
98620. 

Some statistics of interest: 

Churches Requesting Pastor List 24 
Churches Currently Seeking a Pastor 1 1 
Listed churches found pastors 7 

Pastors Requesting Church List 50 

Men Currently Seeking Pastorates 32 
Listed Men found other 

churches/ministries 6 



Inquiries handled by phone 42 

Copies of letters, applications, 
resumes 295 

Gregory M. Howell 
Coordinator 

The FGBC Strategy Committee printed report 
was pointed out by chairman Bob Fetterhoff. 

REPORT OF THE STRATEGY COMMITTEE 
Presented by Robert D. Fetterhoff, Chm. 

History 

Seven years ago the Moderator of our 
Fellowship recommended that the Fellowship 
Council present to National Conference by 1989 
a fully developed strategy of outreach for the 
Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches, giving 
us direction for the final decade of our century 
This strategy should include a clear statement of 
identity, our purpose, and our goals. It should 
also propose a cooperative program which will 
permit teamwork and involvement on all levels of 
our fellowship." 

Since that time a Masterplan has been 
developed and various goals have been 
accomplished all across our Fellowship of 
churches. The Masterplan is much like a 
skeleton. It is essential in order for a body to 
function effectively, but if it becomes too visible 
the body becomes gaunt and unattractive. With 
this in mind, the National Strategy Committee 
has worked diligently to encourage the 
implementation of various national goals without 
much fanfare. A revised copy of our Masterplan 
is attached to this report. 
Progress 

During 1993-94, FOCUS II retreats were held 
in five regions across this country to encourage 
a new vision for what God can do with our 
Fellowship in the years that are ahead. A great 
sense of excitement and unity was experienced 
in these retreats This sense of teamwork is a 
result of a commitment by many to work together 
to accomplish great things for God. 

Three regional meetings were held to 
discuss the following questions with regional 
advisors 

1 ) What has been done in the past 2 years 
in your district and individual churches to 
fulfill any of the Masterplan goals' 

2) What goals in each of our 6 ob|ectives 
would you modify or add in order to fulfill 
our purpose 7 

3) What would it take to double our number 
of churches by the year 2000 both here 
and overseas 9 

4) What are the church-planting goals for 
your district by the year 2000' 

5) Of all the goals in our Masterplan, what 



do you believe are the top 3 priorities for 
our Fellowship 9 
These regional meetings were attended with 
enthusiasm and excellent discussions occured. 
Organization 

The National Strategy Committee consists of 
three appointed members from each of the three 
regions of the country. Additionally, Ed Trenner 
has been elected to serve an indefinite term as 
our consultant. To provide for coordination and 
communication, the Moderator-Elect and current 
Moderator serve as "ex -officio" members of the 
committee. Current members are: 

Robert Fetterhoff-Chm., Central region, term 
ending 1994 

Kurt Miller- Eastern Region, term ends 1995 
Dan Thornton - W. Region, term ends 1996 
Ed Trenner - Consultant, indefinite term 
Ed Lewis - Moderator-Elect 1993-1994 
Steve Peters - Second Moderator-Elect 
Advisory Group Meetings 

Each year the National Strategy Committee 
meets with its advisors in three regional 
meetings across the country. These meetings 
were conducted at the following locations and 
dates: Wooster, OH (Nov. 1-3, 1993), San Juan 
Capistrano, CA (Jan. 26-27, 1994), and Atlanta, 
GA (April 18-20, 1994). A list of advisory group 
members representing the various districts of the 
country is listed below. 

Expectations of advisory group members are 
as follows: 

a. be willing to serve 2 or 3 years 

b. attend 1 regional meeting each year 

c. attend 1 Nat'l. Conference mtg. each year 

d. be a point of contact in the district 

e. provide reports-district and Strategy Com. 
f.mitiate Strategy Committee implementations 

on a district level 

EASTERN REGION 

Allegheny - Michael Lookenott, 1994 

Chesapeake - Jeff Thornley, 1996 

East Central Florida - Jeff Dunkle, 1996 

Florida Suncoast - David Kennedy. 1996 

Mid-Atlantic - Paul Hartman, 1996 

Northern Atlantic - Michael Brubaker, 1994 

South Florida - 

Southern - Dean Fetterhoff, 1996 

Virginia - Jess Truax, 1996 

West Penn - 

WESTERN REGION 
Arctic - Dan Thornton, 1994 
Hawaii - Dave Mitchell, 1996 
Mountain-Plains - Chris Ball, 1996 
Nor-Cal - Robert McMillan, 1996 
Northwest - Greg Howell, 1994 
So. Cal./Arizona - David Marksbury, 1994 
Southwest - Steve Galegor 



CENTRAL REGION 
Indiana - Dick Cron, 1995 
Iowa-Midlands - Bob Foote, 1995 
Michigan - Mick Rockafellow, 1995 
Northcentral Ohio - Bernie Simmons, 1994 
Northeastern Ohio - Bud Olszewski, 1994 
Southern Ohio - Brian White, 1995 

Conclusion 

Our purpose is to stimulate creativity on all 
levels - churches, districts and organizations - so 
this strategy will come up from the grass roots 
and not be imposed from above. Let's join 
together in a unified effort to reach our world for 
Christ. 

Yours because HIS, 
Robert D. Fetterhoff, Chm. 
National Strategy Committee 

MASTERPLAN OF THE 

FELLOWSHIP OF 

GRACE BRETHREN CHURCHES 

Revised by Strategy Committee and 
Fellowship Council, 1/7/94 

In the light of the needs of our world, the 
concerns within our churches, and the mandates 
of our Lord, the Strategy Committee 
recommends the following purpose statement, 
six objectives and goals for the 1990's. We 
believe the following dreams reflect the kind of 
Fellowship we desire in the year 2000 A.D. . . . 
a Fellowship both alive with faith and pleasing to 
our Lord. 

This document is meant to stimulate 
focused planning on the part of national 
organizations, districts and local churches. 

PURPOSE STATEMENT 
THE FELLOWSHIP OF GRACE BRETHREN 
CHURCHES EXISTS TO ENCOURAGE AND 
ENABLE MEMBER CHURCHES IN EQUIPPING 
AND UNITING THE SAINTS IN FULFILLING 
THE GREAT COMMISSION 

CONTINUING OBJECTIVES OF FGBC 

1) To encourage personal fellowship with Jesus 
characterized by love and obedience to His 
Word. John 15:5-11, Hebrews 10:23- 
25, I John 2:4-5. 

2) To encourage personal evangelism and 
discipleship. Matt. 28:18-20, II Pet. 3:18 

3) To disciple leaders for present and future 
ministries throughout the Fellowship. 

Mark 3:14 II Tim 2:2. 

4) To plant Grace Brethren Churches world- 
wide. Matt. 16:18, Acts 14:23, Col. 4:3 

5) To develop clear communication throughout 
the Fellowship. Eph. 4:15, Col. 4:6. 



6) To strategize and implement vision 

throughout the Fellowship. Prov. 29:18. Jn. 
4:35. 

GOALS OF THE FGBC 

1) To encourage personal fellowship with 
Jesus characterized by love and 
obedience to His Word 

A Stimulate a renewed and creative 

emhasis on the systematic practice of 
prayer by: 

a. Evaluate what each district has 
done to conduct a Prayer Retreat 
during 1989-1992. 

b. Plan opportunities tor tocused 
prayer during regular Conference 
Sessions in 1993. 

B. Encourage each pastor to make 
himself accountable on a monthly 
basis to another pastor for his 
personal holiness, prayer and 
example to the flock. 

a. Provide examples of pastoral 
accountability for personal 
holiness 

b. Each District Ministenum develop 
two ways for pastors to have closer 
personal relationships 

C. Encourage spiritual revival in our 
churches by: 

a Each District Ministenum identify 
what their churches are doing that 
demands courage and sacrifice. 

b. Develop a National Prayer Team 
focused on revival in our 
churches. 

2) To encourage personal evangelism and 
discipleship 

A Collect and publish what Grace 
Brethren Churches are doing to 
promote evangelism and discipleship 
internationally. 

B. Each national organization identify 
their resources that will encourage 
evangelism and discipleship in the 
Fellowship of Grace Brethren 
Churches. 

C. Design an integrated strategy 
involving local churches, district and 
national organizations that will 
increase the effectiveness of 
evangelism internationally. 

D National ministenum collect from 

every member his personal goals for 
evangelism and discipleship yearly for 
the next three years. 

E. Establish a network of Grace 
Brethren Churches conducting 
similar social concern ministries. 



3) To disciple leaders for present and 
future ministries throughout the 
Fellowship 

A. Design an integrated training 

process that develops and mobilizes 
leaders among our men. women, 
children and youth. (A path to full 
time ministry.) 

B Encourage each district ministenum to 

identify the needs of its pastors 
and provide training in maximizing 
their leadership. 

C. Each Grace Brethren Church identify 
the top five potential pastoral or 
missionary leaders in the church and 
begin challenging and training them. 

4) To plant Grace Brethren Churches world- 
wide 

A. The 1994 National Conference 
prayerfully assist the planting of a new 
Grace Brethren Church within the 
proximity of that years conference 
site, and that every three years 
thereafter National Conference 
convene in a ma|or city for the same 
purpose. 

B. Each Grace Brethren Church 
participate in initiating a new church 
resulting in 2000 churches world-wide 
by the year 2000. 

5) To develop clear communication 
throughout the Fellowship 

A. Create a central information 
gathering and distribution center for 
the Fellowship. 

B. Encourage greater communication, 
relationship and accountability 
between pastors, churches, and 
districts on the basis of natural 
clusters. 

a. Each District establish an 
emergency care team for local 
churches and/or pastors to assist 
in times of crisis 

C. Track our progress in fulfilling the 
goals of our Masterplan by developing 
a reporting system for churches, 
districts and organizations to share 
significant achievements and 
blessings. 

D. Publish a quarterly bulletin insert 
celebrating progress on goals and 
ideas for implementing the FGBC 
Masterplan. 



6) To strategize and implement vision 
throughout the Fellowship 

A. The strategy committee continue its 
work of coordinating a Fellowship 
strategy. 

a. The Strategy Advisory Group meet 
yearly with the leaders of national 
organizations for the purpose of 
implementation and coordination. 

b. A yearly budget with suggestions 
for funding to be submitted by the 
committee. 

c. Provide for lay participation in all 
decision-making bodies of the 
Fellowship. 

B. Implement plans to establish an 
International Fellowship of Grace 
Brethren Churches 

a. Identify the leadership of the 
international fellowship. 

b. Establish a communication 
system to track church planting 
world-wide. 

c. Organize an international 
conference by 1995 with 
representation from each country. 

C. Each local church and district have a 
written strategy for achieving its goals 
through the year 2000 AD. 

D. Record the history of the FGBC 
Masterplan by identifying and 
maintaining a list of all the milestones 
for publication and celebration 



THE ELEMENTS OF 
A GRACE BRETHREN CHURCH 

A Grace Brethren Church is a local assembly 
of believers in Jesus Christ who are affiliated 
with the Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches, 
or its counterpart Fellowship in other nations, 
and are committed to: 

1. One another as a spiritual family; 

2. The Statement of Faith as a summary 
of our biblical belief and practice; 

3 The practice of triune-immersion 

baptism only and three-fold communion 
only; 

4. Oversight by an elder (or elders) who 
fulfill(s) scriptural qualifications; and 

5. The observance of regular worship 
services. 

The purpose of a local church is the worship 
of God, the edification and fellowship of 
believers, and the fulfillment of the Great 
Commission. 



FOCUS 2000 WORLDWIDE GOALS 

* Expand to 2000 Churches 

Enlist 20,000 people in a prayer network for 
world evangelization. 

Enlist a team of 350 church-planting 
missionaries 

Celebrate 100,000 conversions to Jesus 
Christ. 

Establish international partnership in 
reaching unreached people groups 

Establish an international communication 
network for reporting progress of goals 

BUSINESS SESSION II 
Saturday, July 23, 1994 

1. Business Session II was called to order at 
3:11 p.m. 

2. The Secretary read and moved the approval 
of the minutes of Business Session I which was 
seconded and passed. 

3. Additional Delegates were presented by 
Membership Chairman Thornton: 27 lay 
delegates and 26 ministerial for a total of 53 
additional delegates from 22 churches for a 
combined total of 303 lay delegates and 205 
Ministerial delegates for a grand total of 508 
delegates from 152 churches. He moved that 
these additional delegates be seated which was 
seconded and passed. 

A motion prevailed that we ratify all 
business from Session I since we now have a 
quorum. Discussion included a question 
concerning how many churches were necessary 
to make quorum. The answer is 147 (1 more 
than 50%) and we have 152 present. 
4 The Chairman of the Parliamentary 
Committee reported on the election results: 

Second Moderator-elect - John Mcintosh 

He also explained the need to re-vote for 
Fellowship Council Representatives in each 
region since a simple majority is needed to be 
elected. He then instructed us to vote for one in 
our districts region: 

Eastern: Kenneth Koontz or Jeffrey Thornley 
Central: Robert Foote or Scott Miles (second 
highest to fill unexpired term of Gary Austin) 
Western: Luke Kauffman or Philip Teran 
The Parliamentary Chairman instructed each 
region to vote in turn and hand in ballots before 
next regions candidates are announced. 

6. We returned to the motion on the by-law 
change with an explanation by the Moderator 
that the change would assist when we have 
difficulties establishing quorums as we have had 
the first day of business the last couple of years. 



It will not facilitate hastily called meetings. 

A comment from the floor was made 
suggesting that this change could open the door 
to problems down the road and the speaker said 
he would prefer that the percentage be lowered 
instead of opening the door wide open. 

Question: What were reasons that caused 
the Fellowship Council not to consider lowering 
the percentage? John Mayes, Fellowship 
Council By-law Chairman answered that though 
considered, it seems most expedient to change 
the quorum this way. 

The Parliamentary Chairman, quoting 
Robert's Rules, suggested that corporations and 
churches have already adopted that a quorum 
be those in attendance. He called for a standing 
vote and announced a 2/3 majority. 
9. FGBC Moderator Bob Fetterhoff reported on 
the activities, actions and recommendations of 
the Fellowship Council, pointing out the 
Highlights Sheet in the conference packet. He 
noted that we had just acted on one of the 
Fellowship Council recommendations. He 
summarized the Columbus Mid-year meeting in 
January and encouraged the appropriate 
representatives from our Districts to attend the 
joint meeting planned again in January, this time 
in California. He also expressed appreciation for 
the Fellowship Council and the churches' 
prayerful support. 

10. First Moderator-Elect Ed Lewis (commenting 
on his new propaganda shirt) and Fellowship 
Coordinator Charles Ashman presented a video 
and information concerning the 1995 conference 
in San Diego, July 22-28, with emphasis on 



ministry opportunities. Ed commented on the 
value of selecting a 2nd Moderator-Elect to 
provide for advance planning. Charles told of 
the beauty of the San Diego setting and thanked 
the attendees for cooperating with the 
registration system promising to send future 
information to this years attendees. 
11. The Parliamentary Chairman reported the 
Election results: 

Nomination Committee: Kenneth Bickel, Don 

Eshelman, Tad Hobert, Daniel Pacheco, 

Jack Peters, Jr., and Steve Taylor. 

BEM Board: Ministerial-Phil Guerena and 

Lyle Sweeney; Laymen-Tony DeRosa 

and Earl Dohner. 

Fellowhsip Council Representatives: 

Eastern: Kenneth Koontz 

Central: Scott Miles 

Unexpired Term: Robert Foote 

Western: Philip Teran 
A motion prevailed to ratify Bob Foote as the 
Fellowship Council Representative to fill Gary 
Austin's unexpired term in the Central Region. 

12. No New Business was presented. 

The Moderator asked the new officers to 
stand and led in prayer after reading from Psalm 
141:8 and then installed these new Officers. 

13. The Secretary read and moved the approval 
of the minutes of Business Session II which was 
seconded and passed. 

14. A motion prevailed to Adjourn 

Respectfully submitted, 
Gregory M. Howell 
FGBC Secretary 



Cooperating National Organizations 



GRACE BRETHREN FOREIGN MISSIONS 

1401 Kings Highway, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 588, Winona Lake, IN 46590 



Staff 

Executive Director 

Rev. Tom Julien 
Missionary /Donor Relations 

Mr. Greg Weimer 
Director of Finance and Administration 

Mr. Steve Popenfoose 
Church Relations Coordinator 

Rev. Jay Bell 
Technical Coordinator 

Rev. Gordon Austin 
Candidate Coordinator 

Mr. Blaine Horst 
Assistant to the Executive Director 
(part-time) 

Mrs. Robin Penfold 
Communications Coordinator (part-time) 

Mr. Kip Cone 
Distribution Coordinator 

Rev. Larry Hubartt 
Accounts Payable Manager (part-time) 

Mrs. Lee Ann Horst 
Receipts Manager 

Miss Karen Spicer 
Secretary, Administration (part-time) 

Mrs. Kathy Herman 
Secretary/Receptionist (part-time) 

Mrs. Lillian Teeter 
Creative Consultant (volunteer) 

Mr. Terry Julien 

Board of Trustees 

(Term ending 1994) 

Rev. Edwin Cashman 

Rev. Steve Taylor 

Dr. Terry Hofecker 

Mr. Harold (Hal) Landis 

(Term ending J 995) 

Rev. Dean Fetterhoff 

Rev. John Teevan 

Dr. David Plaster 

Mr. Larry Totzke 

(Term ending 1996) 

Dr. S. Wayne Beaver 

Rev. Wayne Hannah 

Dr. Sherwood Lingenfelter 

Rev. Ed Trenner 



Officers of the Board 

President-Rev. John Teevan 

Vice President-Rev. Steve Taylor 

Secretary-Rev. Wayne Hannah 

Treasurer-Dr. David Plaster 



FOREIGN MISSIONARY DIRECTORY 

(Phone numbers follow addresses) 
*Home Ministries - Send mail to home office 



ARGENTINA 

Bailey, Rev. Steve and Wilma 
Guamini 6498, 1875 Wilde 
Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA 
(011-54) 1-206-0288 

Guiles, Rev. David and Susan 
Ramos Mejia 16, 1876 Don Bosco 
Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA 
(011-54) 1-259-3384 

Hammett, Pastor Marcos (Raquel) 
Las Barrancas 110 
5196 Santa Rosa de Calamuchita 
Pcia de Cordoba, ARGENTINA 
(011-54) 546-20-551 

McCaman, Rev. Gary and Linda 
S.M. Castel Verde 2421 
1879 Quilmes Oeste 
Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA 
(011-54) 1-250-0973 

Peacock, Miss Alice 
P.O. Box 588 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(21 9) 269-4657 
"Medical Leave 



BRAZIL 

Burk, Rev. Bill and Imogene 

Cx 101, 68.447 Vila dos Cabanos, PA 

BRAZIL 

(011-55) 91-754-1636 



Green, Rev. Daniel and Nancy 

Av. Joao XXIII, No. 520 

38.400 Uberiandia, M.G. 

BRAZIL 

(011-55) 34-236-6426 

Hodgon, Rev. Earle and Dorothy 

Caixa Postal 861 

66.017-970 Belem, Para 

BRAZIL 

(011-55) 91-721-3539 

'Home Ministries: Jun.-Sep. '95 

Triplehom, Dr. Bruce and Lisa 

Ave. Humaita, 1975 

Conjunto Dom Fernando, #34 

Bairro do Marco 

66.093-110 Belem, Para 

BRAZIL 

(011-55) 91-226-6641 

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC 

Address for all CAR. missionaries is: 
B.P. 240, Bangui 
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, 

AFRICA 



Phone number (011-236) 61-6823 

Daugherty, Dr. Dave and Karen 

Davis, Miss Diana 

"Home Ministries: Jun. '95-Jan. '96 

Foster, Miss Karen 

Hines, Dr. Jim and Martha 

"Home Ministries: Jul. '94-Jul. '96 
Hocking, Rev. Jim and Faye 

"Home Ministries: Jun. '94-Jun. '95 
Mensinger, Miss Carol 

"Medical Leave 

Mensinger, Rev. Eddie and Linda 
Moeller, Rev. Dan and Mary Lou 
Peters, Rev. Tom and Sue 
Taylor, Rev. Mike and Myra 
Uphouse, Mrs. Miriam 
'Home Ministries: May '95 
Vamer, Miss Janet 
Volovski, Dr. Mike and Amy 

"Home Ministries: Jun. '95- 
Wilson, Miss Lois 
Wooler, Miss Barb 

"Leave of Absence: Dec. '93-Dec. '95 



CHAD 

Address for all Chad missionaries is: 
B.P. 183 
Moundou 

REPUBLIC OF CHAD 
AFRICA 
Phone number (011-235) 69-14-07 

Puhl, Rev. Frank and Karin 
Stallter, Rev. Tom and Sharon 



CZECH REPUBLIC 

Bemdt, Rev. Mark and Jo Anna 
Lamacova 907, byt 24 
Barrandov Prague 5 15200 
CZECH REPUBLIC 
(011-42) 2-561-3128 

Swain, Rev. George and Cindy 
P.O. Box 167 
Prague 1 11121 
CZECH REPUBLIC 
(011-42) 2-591-421 

ENGLAND 

Angle, Rev. Roy 
103 S. Lakeshore Dr. 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 268-0696 
"Leave of Absence 

Kiddoo, Rev. Billl and Beckie 
40 Thornton Rd„ Shirley, Solihull 
West Midlands, B90 4TP, ENGLAND 
(011-44) 21-744-7277 
"Home Ministries: May - Sep. '95 

Schwan, Rev. Dave and Becky 
101 Burman Rd., Shirley, Solihull 
West Midlands, B90 2BQ, ENGLAND 
(011-44) 21-733-6066 

FRANCE 

Barlow, Rev. Tom and Mary Ann 
10, rue de le Roserie 
Taisey 

71100 ST. REMY 
FRANCE 

(011-33) 85-93-69-07 
"Home Ministries: Oct. '94-Jan. '95 

Burgess, Mr. Greg 

6, rue Paul Chenavard 

69001 Lyon 

FRANCE 

(011-33) 78-28-68-47 

DeArmey, Rev. Larry and Vicki 

100A cours Lafayette 

69003 Lyon 

FRANCE 

(011-33) 78-62-02-23 

Good, Rev. Kent and Becky 
34B, blvd. de la Mame 
21 000 Dijon , FRANCE 
(011-33) 80-74-09-30 
"Home Ministries: Nov. '94-Feb. '95 



Griffith, Rev. Dave and Susan 
13A, rue de Strasbourg 
71200 Le Creusot, FRANCE 
(011-33) 85-80-10-07 



Hickey, Rev. Tom and Laura 
13, Place de la Ferrandiere 
69003 Lyon, FRANCE 
(011-33) 72-36-35-52 

Hobart, Rev. Dave and Susie 
5, rue Georges Clemenceau 
71230 St. Vallier, FRANCE 
(011-33) 85-58-32-50 

Klawitter, Rev. Paul and Louise 
3c, rue Ernest Lory 
21000 Dijon, FRANCE 
(011-33) 80-66-54-63 

Landis, Miss Lisa 

8, ave. Charles de Gaulle 

Les Boulets, Apt. 1 

71 200 Le Creusot 

FRANCE 

(011-33) 85-55-11-55 

Martin, Mr. Dennis and Jeannie 

2, rue Marechal de Tassigny 

71100 Chalon-Sur-Saone 

FRANCE 

(011-33) 85-43-31-41 

Morris, Miss Patty 

c/o Le C.E.P. 

85, cours de la Republique 

69100 Villeurbanne 

FRANCE 

(011-33) 78-85-89-50 

Pritchett, Miss Chontelle 

8, ave. Charles de Gaulle 

Les Boulets, Apt. 1 

FRANCE 

(011-33) 85-55-11-55 

Sims, Rev. Mark and Joy 
7, rue Bigonnet 
71000 Macon, FRANCE 
(011-33) 85-38-02-55 

Weaver, Mr. Marlin and Sue 
Chateau de St. Albain 
71260 St. Albain, FRANCE 
(011-33) 85-33-14-28 
Chateau (011-33) 85-33-12-95 

GERMANY 

Haak, Miss Edna 
Hegelstr. 123 
73431 Aalen 
GERMANY 
(011-49) 7361-35282 
'Home Ministries: Oct. '94-Jan. '95 



Jackson, Rev. Daniel and Rachel 
Lederstr. 17 
75365 Calw 
GERMANY 
(011-49) 7051-70711 
"Home Ministries: Jun. '95 

Kern, Rev. Steve and Celeste 
Auguste-Supper-Str. 13 
75365 Calw-Alzenberg 
GERMANY 
(01 1 -49) 

Manduka, Rev. David and Kathy 
Kurt-Schumacher-Str. 167 
73529 Schwabisch Gmund 
GERMANY 
(011-49) 7171-83068 

Pappas, Rev. John and Becky 

Liebigstr. 7/1 

73432 Aalen 

GERMANY 

(011-49) 7361-87896 

Ramsey, Rev. Dan and Denise 

Egerlanderstr. 3 

71229 Leonberg 

GERMANY 

(011-49) 7152-45609 

"Home Ministries: May-June '95 

Stover, Mr. Roger and Regine 
Beim Schloessle 13 
73550 Waldstetten 
GERMANY 
(011-49) 7171-49227 

JAPAN 

Justiniano, Rev. Ralph and Joan 
98-099 Uao PI. #803 
Aiea, HI 96701 
(808/487-8596) 

Kimbauer, Rev. Ted and Kristen 
Canyon Mansion Hibangaoka #108 
3-3-16 Kurihara, Niiza Shi 
Saita ma-Ken, T352, JAPAN 
(011-81) 424-23-1480 

O'Dell, Rev. Cecil and Debbie 
Maruyama Haitsu 102 
3-12-19 Ishigami, Niiza 'Shi 
Saitama-Ken 352, JAPAN 
(011-81) 424-76-5319 

MEXICO 

Churchill, Rev. Jack and Rosa 
2758 Caulfield Dr. 
San Diego, CA 92154 
(619) 423-7903 



Farrell, Miss Bess 
Xola 125-103 
Col Alamos 03400 
Mexico D.F., MEXICO 
(011-52) 5-579-9550 

Guerena, Rev. Martin and Kristy 
Apdo Postal 21-472 
Coyoacan 

04021 Mexico D.F., MEXICO 
(011-52) 5-689-6198 
'Home Ministries: May-Sep. '95 

Pieters, John 

c/o Alejandro Marcial Corzo 

Playa Carabali #47 

Col. Marte 

08830 Deleg. Iztacalco 

Mexico D.F., MEXICO 

(011-52) 5-633-7126 

Schemmer, Ron and Susan 
561 Wisteria St. 
Chula Vista, CA 91911 
(619) 421-9057 

Welling, Miss Brenda 
Xola 125-103 
Col Alamos 03400 
Mexico D.F., MEXICO 
(011-52) 5-579-9550 

PHILIPPINES 

Beaver, Mr. Daniel and Tori 

c/o Faith Academy 

P.O. Box 2016 

MCPO 

0706 Makati Metro Manila 

PHILIPPINES 

(011-63) 2-665-6955 

Hulett, Rev. Clay and Kim 
P.O. Box A.C. 527 
Quezon City, 1109 
PHILIPPINES 
(011-63) 2-645-9416 

Leigh, Rev. Nathan and DD 
P.O. Box A. C. 527 
Quezon City, 1109 
PHILIPPINES 

Nissley, Miss Bonnie 
Batangas Language Center 
Overseas Missionary Fellowship 
4200 Batangas City 
PHILIPPINES 



Ruiz, Rev. Ted and Vivien 
P.O. Box A.C. 527 
Quezon City, 1109 
PHILLIPINES 
'Home Ministries: Jun. '94-Jun. '95 

PORTUGAL 

Hawkins, Rev. Tim and Julie 
Rua Calouste Gulbenkian 
17, 2 - H3 

4050 Porto, PORTUGAL 
(011-351) 2-600-6313 

Hull, Miss Margaret 
Tra. da Vitoria 
70, AQ Gemunde 
4470 Maia, PORTUGAL 
(011-351) 2-981-3613 

Schwartz, Rev. Ralph and Martha 
Av. Antonio Santos Leite 157-1 D 
4470 Maia, PORTUGAL 
(011-351) 2-948-2230 

RUSSIA 

Caudill, Deanna 
P.O. Box 588 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(011-7) 3832-225364 

Michaels, Rev. Paul and Cindy 
P.O. Box 588 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(011-7) 3832-261464 

SPAIN 

Poupart, Rev. Walter and Ruth 
C/Ibi, I, pta. 5 
Terramelar (Paterna) 
46007 Valencia, SPAIN 
(011-34) 6-137-2490 

Satterthwaite, Rev. Rick and Twinky 
Almudaina, 21 Esc. 7, 2. pta. 
46007 Valencia, SPAIN 
(011-34) 6-341-4187 

APPOINTEES 
Brazil 

Hulse, Miss Barbara 
3715 E. 24th St. 
Tucson, AZ 85713-2438 
(602) 327-2238 

England 

Weaver, Brian and Rhonda 
209 Co. Rd. 1675, R.R. 2 
Jeromesville, OH 44840 
(419) 368-3236 



France 

Singleton, Mike 
P.O. Box 751 
Hilliard, OH 43026 
(614) 876-0575 
(SOWers) 

Germany 

Anderson, Barbara 
121 Pine Island Rd. 
Columbia, SC 29212-8403 
(803) 732-3724 
(SOWers) 

Cone, Kip and Mary 
604 7 2 Chestnut Ave. 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 267-4789 

Total Mobilization 

Grover, Gordon and Barbara 
3606 N. Dakota Ave. 
Modesto, CA 95358 
(209) 545-3569 

RETIRED 

Altig, Dr. Keith 
13755 E. Walnut 
Whittle r, CA 90602 
(310) 693-8182 

Balzer, Mr. Ablert and Eulah 
408 Aloha Circle, Villa P 
Long Beach, CA 90805 
(310) 423-4748 

Cochran, Miss Rosella 
Grace Village Apt. 181-F 
P.O. Box 337 
Winona Lake, In 46590 
(219) 372-6181 

Cone, Mrs. Ruth Ann 

c/o Mile Raymonde Meignoz 

23, rue Garibaldi 

69006 Lyon, FRANCE 

(011-33) 72-44-98-26 

Cripe, Miss Mary 
1520 Teresa St. 
Modesto, CA 95350 
(209) 527-7709 

Dowdy, Mrs. Dortha 
5864 Teal Lane 
El Paso, TX 79924 
(915) 751-5889 

Garter, Rev. Martin and Beverley 
101 E. Twelfth St. 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 269-7124 

Goodman, Rev. Marvin and Dorothy 
600 Chestnut Ave. 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 269-5068 



Haag, Rev. Walter and Alys 
207 Van Rowe Ave. 
Duncanville, TX 75116-3319 
(214) 298-6149 

Habegger, Miss Mary Ann 
605 Stucky Street, Apt. B-2 
Beme, IN 46711 
(219) 589-8266 

Hoyt, Rev. Solon and Kathryn 
1413 Wooster Road 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 269-7215 

Johnson, Rev. George and Evelyn 
513 Woodland Ave. 
Wooster, OH 44691 
(216) 263-1177 

Jones, Miss Gail 
R.D. 4, P.O. Box 59B 
Johnstown, PA 15905 
(814) 479-2311 

Kent, Miss Ruth 
P.O. Box 588 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 269-4657 

Maconaghy, Rev. Hill 
Grace Village, Apt. 172 
P.O. Box 337 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 372-6172 

Mason, Dr. Harold and Margaret 
2075 Chapman Lake Dr. 
Warsaw, IN 46580 
(219) 269-7187 

Miller, Rev. Eddie and Eileen 

Caixa Postal 368 

66.017-970 Belem, Para 

BRAZIL 

(011-55) 91-235-2192 

Miller, Mrs. Lois 
24600 Mountain Ave., Sp. 40 
Hemet, CA 92544-1966 
(714) 927-7298 

Mishler, Miss Anna Marie 
62 Coach Lane 
Akron, OH 44312 
(216) 794-8728 

Sickel, Mrs. Loree 

Hacienda Grand Retirement Village 

1740 Grande Ave. #225 

Long Beach, Ca 90804-2011 

(310) 597-5590 



Snyder, Rev. Roy and Ruth 
901 Robson Rd. 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 267-3234 

Snyder, Miss Ruth 
P.O. Box 588 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 269-4657 

Thurston, Miss Marian 
Box 23 

Le Grand, IA 501 42 
(515) 479-2192 



Tresise, Rev. Foster and Marguerite 
95-303 Waioni St. 
Mililani, HI 96789 
(808) 623-2298 

Williams, Rev. Robert and Lenora 
150 W. Warren St., Box 41 
Peru, IN 46970 
(317) 472-4016 

Zielasko, Rev. Jack and Jean 
114 15th St. 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 
(219) 267-4808 



BALANCE SHEET - BY FUND 
MARCH 31, 1994 



ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash 

Investments 

Accounts receivable 

Notes receivable 

Accrued interest 

Inventories 

Deposits and advances 

Total current assets 
Interfund 

receivable/ payable 
Investments 
Property and Equipment 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND NET 

ASSETS 
Current Liabilities: 

Accounts payable and 
accrued expenses 

Deterred support 

Missionary tunds payable 

Current portion- annuities 
payable 

Other Liabilities: 

Amounts due other 

remaindermen 
Annuities payable-net 
Revocable trust liability 

Total liabilities 

Net Assets: 

Unrestricted 

Board designated 

Restricted 

Net investment inproperty 
and equipment 
Total net assets 
Total Liabilities and 

Net Assets 



General 
Fund 


Restrict- 
ed Fund 

s 

275.303 

(72) 

2.477 


Annuity 
Fund 

S 

1.001 

1.947 


Endow- 
mentFund 

$ 

156.804 

68,000 

4.975 


Trust 
Fund 


Elimina- 
tions 


Total 


S202. 799 

21.324 
28.849 

1,070 


s 

4,137 
1.669 


S 




$202,799 
437.245 
22.921 
96.849 
10,469 


5.063 






19.197 
248.976 








24.260 


259.105 


277. 708 


2.948 


5.806 






794.543 


69,799 

297.422 


(10.857) 


(128.112) 
317,838 


74.821 
1.884.267 


(5.651) 
525.323 






2,727.428 
297.422 


S626.326 


S 266.851 


S 192.674 


2.208.064 


S525.478 


5 




3.819.393 



S 5,259 S 
13.610 
7,242 



S 2.589 S 



144.642 
5.000 



720.747 
1.487.317 375.836 



600.215 266,851 122,933 2.208.064 375.836 



13.610 
7.242 



144,642 
52,977 
5.000 



425.726 

720,747 

2.130,004 



S626, 326 S 266.851 S192.674 2,208.064 S525.478 S 



Statement of Activity - By Fund 
March 31, 1994 





General 
Fund 


Restricted 
Fund 


Annuity 
Fund 

$ 

(2,113) 
(2.113) 


Endow- 
ment 


Trust 
Fund 

$ 

49.506 


Elimina- 
tions 


Total 


Support and Revenue: 
Contributions 
Investment income 
Other income 


3,958,319 

7.007 

20.171 

3,985,497 

2,777,138 
32.990 


S 218,952 
15.358 


$ 401.653 
212.592 


$ 

(20,586) 
(7,921 ) 
(28.507) 

(23,120) 

(5.387) 
(28.507) 


4.578.924 
263.877 
10.137 


Total Support and 
Revenue 

Expenses: 
Program services 
Missionary and field 
Project 
Other 
Endowment 


234.310 

166,610 
1.000 


614,245 

150,075 
150,075 


49.506 
46.290 


4.852.938 

2.777.138 
166.610 
57.160 

144.688 




2,810,128 

397.844 
346,989 
744,833 

3.554,961 

430.536 

(1.855) 

170,396 

1,138 
S 600.215 


167.610 




46.290 


3.145.596 


Supporting activities: 
General and administ. 
Promotional 




397,844 

346.989 














744.833 


Total Expenses: 


167,610 
66.700 

216,646 

(16.495) 

S 266,851 




150,075 
464.170 

44.426 

1.482,571 

216,897 
2,208.064 


46.290 
3.216 

10,757 
361,863 


(28.507) 


3,890.429 


Excess (Deficit) of Support/ 
Revenue Over Expenses 

Cumulative Effect of 
Change in Accounting 
Principle 

Net assets, Beginning of 
year 

Transfers 


(2.113) 

11.127 

315.459 

(201.540) 
S 122. 933 


962.509 

64.455 
2.546.935 


Net Assets, End ot Year 


S375.836 


S 


3.573,899 



THE GRACE BRETHREN HOME MISSIONS 
COUNCIL, INCORPORATED 

1401 Kings Highway, Winona Lake, Indiana 46590 

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 587 

PHONE 219-267-5161 FAX 219-269-4066 



Officers and Staff 

Pres. - Dr. Luke E. Kauffman, 12920 

Wellsford Circle, Anchorage, AK 99516 
V. Pres. - Rev. Robert Fetterhoff, 912 

Douglas Dr., Wooster, OH 44691 
Secy, and Exec. Dir. - Mr. Larry N. 

Chamberlain, 108 Apple Court, 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 
Treas. - Mr. Jerry Michael, Route 4, 105 

Meadow Dr., Martinsburg, WV 25401 
Director of Administration - Rev. Jesse B. 

Deloe, 102 Third Street, Winona Lake, 

IN 46590 
Directors of Church-Planting and Development 
National - Rev. Kurt A. Miller, 1835 W 

200 S, Warsaw, IN 46580 
East - Rev. William H. Snell, 1210 Rozella 

Road, Warsaw, IN 46580 
West - Rev. David E. Marksbury, P.O. Box 

222, Cypress, CA 90630 
Director of Ministry Support - Mr. Kirk 

Heng, 718 N. Lake St., Warsaw, IN 46580 
Accountant - Miss Brenda Kent, 1401 Park 

Avenue, Winona Lake, IN 46590 
Videographer and Media Specialist - Paul 

Vance 
Secretary to Executive Director - Judi Rose 
Writer - Miss Kathy Allison 
Assistant to Accountant - Mrs. Linda Leonard 
Accounting Assistant (part time) - Mrs. Joyce 

dinger 
Receptionists (part-time) - Mrs. Lola Mattfeld 

and Mrs. Ruth Gregory 

Board of Directors 

(Term Ending 1994) 
Mr. Robert Bryant, 2920 Bosham Lane, 

Midlothian, VA 23113 
Rev. Robert Combs, 647 Parkway Blvd., 

Norton, OH 44203 
Mr. Mark Curtis, 3646 California Ave., 

Long Beach, CA 90807 
Dr. Luke E. Kauffman, 12920 Wellsford 

Circle, Anchorage, AK 99516 

(Term Ending 1995/ 
Mr. Morgan Burgess, 163 N. Franklin 

St., Delaware, OH 43015 
Rev. Robert Fetterhoff, 912 Douglas Dr., 

Wooster, OH 44691 
Rev. John Mcintosh, 2735 N. Beth PI., 

Simi Valley, CA 93065 



Mr. Jerry Michael, Route 4, 105 Meadow 

Dr., Martinsburg, WV 25401 
Mr. Clair Floyd, 11251 Lipscomb St., 

Anchorage, AK 99516 

(Term ending 1996) 
Rev. Timothy Boal, 703 Thornberry Dr., 

Harleysville, PA 19438 
Mr. Jack Broyles, 1607 Whitehall Rd., 

Anderson, SC 29621 
Dr. James Custer, 2515 Carriage Lane, 

Powell, OH 43065 
Dr. John W. Mayes, Route 9, Box 559B, 

Longview, TX 75601 
Mr. Jim Shipley, 803 Arbor Lane, Winona 

Lake, IN 46590 

Home Mission Directory 

Cary, NC - Hope Community Church. Pastor - 

Mike Lee. 
Delmont, PA - Delmont Grace Brethren Church. 

Pastor - Dave Nitz. 
Dryhill, KY - Victory Mountain Grace 

Brethren Chapel. Pastor - Samuel Baer. 
Gainesville, FL - Grace Brethren Church. 

Pastor - Scotty Kerr. 
Greencastle, PA - Conococheague Grace 

Brethren Church. Pastor - Alan Clingan. 
Land O' Lakes, FL - Land O' Lakes Grace 

Brethren Church. Pastor - Mike Govey. 
McAllen, TX - McAllen Grace Brethren 

Church. Pastor - Robert Soto 
Montgomeryville, PA - Montgomeryville Grace 

Brethren Church. Pastor - David Allen. 
Murrieta, CA - Grace Brethren Church. Pastor- 
Doug Bukowski. 
Niles, Ml - Niles Grace Brethren Church. 

Pastor - Scott Fetter. 
North Port, FL - Grace Brethren Church. 

Pastor - Edmund DeZago. 
Northwest Phoenix- Valley Life Grace Brethren 

Chapel. Pastor - Ed Waken. 
Philadelphia, PA - Liberty Grace Brethren 

Church. Pastor - Jack Brown. 
Philadelphia, PA - Crossroads Grace Brethren 

Church. Pastor - James Brown. 
Phoenix, AZ - East Valley Grace Brethren 

Church. Pastor - Michael Wallace. 
Richmond, VA (Short Pump) - Fellowship 

Grace Brethren Church. Pastor - David 

Kowalke. 
Tampa, FL - Grace Brethren Church. 

Pastor - John llko. 



Tampa, FL (Hispanic) - Grace Brethren 

Church. Pastor - Jesus Mtlnoz. 
Williamsport, PA - Grace Brethren 

Community Church. Pastor - David Miller. 

GRACE BRETHREN 
CHAPLAINS MINISTRY 

-P.O. Box 587, Winona Lake, IN 46590- 

(Telephone: 219/267-5161) 
Endorsing Agent - Rev. C. Lee Jenkins 
CDR, CHC, USN;, P.O. Box 587, Winona 
Lake, IN 46590. 

Chaplains: (MA J) Charles Card, USA (CPT) Ben 
Collins, USA; (LCOL) William Cochran USA 
(CDR, CHC) John L. Diaz, USN; (COL) James 
Elwell, USAF; (LCDR, CHC) Jack Galle USN' 
(LCDR, CHC) Dayne Nix, USN; (LTC) John 
Patrick, USA; (COL) John Schumacher, USA; 
(CPT) James Schaefer, USA; (CPT) Phil 
Spence, USA. (For current address contact 
endorsing agent). 



Elaine Marpel, Principal, Teacher 
Betty Masimer, Visitation (VIA) 
Andy Moyer. Church Development 
Diana Sandoval, Kindergarten Teacher 
John and Nora Trujillo, Pastor 
Amy Zigler, 3rd and 4th Grade Teacher 

Churches sponsored by the Navajo Mission. 

Cedar Hill Navajo Grace Brethren Church' 

(Tully and Mary Butler) 
Day Mesa Navajo Grace Brethren Church 

(Johnson and Nancy Chiquito) 
Red Lake (AZ) Community Grace Brethren 

Church (John and Nora Trujillo) 

Navajo Committee 

Mr. Jack Broyles, Mr. Larry Chamberlain, 
Rev. Jesse Deloe, Mr. Clair Floyd, Dr. 
Luke Kauffman, Dr. John Mayes, Mr. Jerry 
Michael. 



GRACE BRETHREN 
NAVAJO MINISTRIES, INC. 

- Counselor, NM 87018 - 
(Telephone: 505/568-4454) 

Officers and Staff 

Pres. - Dr. Luke E. Kauffman, 12920 Wellsford 

Circle, Anchorage, AK 99516 
V. Pres. - Rev. Robert Fetterhoff, 912 Douqlas 

Dr., Wooster, OH 44691 
Secretary and Exec. Dir - Mr. Larry N 
Chamberlain, 108 Apple Court, Winona 
Lake, IN 46590 
Treas. - Mr. Jerry Michael, Route 4, 105 
Meadow Dr., Martinsburg, WV 25401 
Steve and Chris Galegor, superintendent, 

promotion and bookkeeper 
Wayne and Terrie Aites, Church Plantinq/ 
Office * 

Dick and Carolyn Battis, Christian Discipleship 

Center 
Arnold and Bessie Betoney, Assoc. Pastor 
Karen Broach, 7th and 8th Grade Teacher 
Daron and Melissa Butler, Church 

Development 
Tully and Mary Butler, Pastor 
Mark and Judy Carpenter, 5th and 6th Grade 

Teacher, School Nurse/Office 
Johnson and Nancy Chiquito, Pastor 
Bob and Betty Clifton, Church Development, 

Maintenance, Kitchen Supervisor (VIA) 
Angie Garber, Visitation (VIA) 
Helen Garrett, 1st and 2nd Grade Teacher 
Jerry and Katie Hall, Maintenance/Teacher's 

Aide (VIA) 
Mark and Jane Hussong. Church Development 
Bob and Norma Lathrop, Maintenance, 
Secretary 



Board of Directors 

Rev. Timothy Boal, Mr. Jack Broyles, 

Mr. Robert Bryant, Mr. Morgan 

Burgess, Rev. Robert Combs, Mr. Mark 
Curtis, Dr. James Custer. Rev. Robert 

Fetterhoff, Mr. Clair Floyd, Dr. Luke 

Kauffman, Dr. John Mayes, Rev. John 

Mcintosh, Mr Jerry Michael, Mr. Jim 
Shipley 

Following are the combined Financial 
Statesments of The Grace Brethren Home 
Missions Council, Inc. and Grace Brethren 
Navajo Ministries, Inc. 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES 

OPERATING EXPENSES & EQUITY 

Year Ending December 31, 1993 



Revenues: 

Offerings 


$ 1,102,469 

386,943 

43,020 

57,854 


Estates and annuities 
Rent 


Interest .... 
Other 


Operating Expenses: 

Direct assistance .... 


1,603.738 
1 102 363 


Administration 


428 357 


Promotion . . . 


166 037 


Payments to annuitants .... 

Excess (deficit) of revenues 

over operating expenses . 


99.344 
1,796,101 

(192,363) 



28 



Other Income (Expense): 

Income from church dissolutions 
Interest 

Excess (deficit) of revenues 

over expenses 



Other equipment 



Net Assets, beginning of year 
Net Assets, end of year 



31,106 
(10,501) 



(171,758) 
1,888,428 



$ 1,716.670 



The above financial statements have been 
audited by the firm of Ashman, Targgart, & 
Man/on, P.C., Certified Public Accountants, 
Fort Wayne, Indiana. A copy of their full report 
is available upon request. 



STATEMENT OF 
FINANCIAL CONDITION 

ASSETS: 
Current Assets: 

Cash $ 149,435 

Offerings in transit 152,403 

Total cash and cash 

equivalents 

Investments , 

Current portion of notes 

receivable 1,000 

Other Current assets 13,722 

Accounts receivable 20,747 

Total Current Assets ... $ 980,751 

Property and equipment: 

Land 36,000 

Buildings 391,382 

Mission real estate 533,177 

Autos and trucks 240,787 



301,838 
643,444 



Less accumulated depr. 



(703,542) 
971,102 



Other Assets: 

Restricted Assets 44,896 

Dissolution property 175,000 

Contributed property 5,430 

Leasehold interest, net .... 16,708 

242,034 

Total Assets $ 2,193,887 

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS 
Current Liabilities: 

Notes payable $ 1 

Current portion of 

long-term debt 13,323 

Accounts payable 14,883 

Accrued annuity installments . 15,726 

Other accrued expenses .... 8,415 

Total current liabilities ... $ 52,348 

Long-term debt, net of 

current portion 202,610 

Annuities Payable 222,259 

Total liabilities $ 477,217 

Net Assets 

Unrestricted: 

Designated 460,699 

Undesignated 1,211,075 

Total Unrestricted 1 ,671 ,774 

Restricted 44,896 

Total net assets 1,716.670 

Total net assets and 

liabilities $ 2,193,887 



GRACE BRETHREN INVESTMENT 
FOUNDATION, INCORPORATED 

P.O. Box 587, Winona Lake, IN 46590 



The Grace Brethren Investment Foundation 
has the same officiary as The Grace Brethren 
Home Missions Council, Inc., Winona Lake, 
Indiana. 

Officers and Staff 

p res. - Dr. Luke E. Kauffman, 12920 

Wellsford Circle, Anchorage, AK 99516 
V. Pres. - Rev. Robert Fetterhoff, 912 

Douglas Dr., Wooster, OH 44691 
Secy, and Exec. Dir. - Mr. Larry N. 

Chamberlain, 108 Apple Court, Winona 

Lake, IN 46590 
Treas. - Mr, Jerry Michaels, Route 4, 105 

Meadow Dr., Martinsburg, WV 25401 
Dir. of GBIF - Mr. James W. Johnson, 2704 

William Dr., Winona Lake, IN 46590 
Secy. - Mrs. Susanne Kessler 
Bookkeeper - Mrs. Wanita Ogden 
Teller/Data Processing - Miss Michelle Marner 
Accountant - Miss Brenda Kent 



Board of Directors 

Rev. Timothy Boal 

Mr. Jack Broyles 

Mr. Robert Bryant 

Mr. Morgan Burgess 

Rev. Robert Combs 

Mr. Mark Curtis 

Dr. James Custer 

Rev. Robert Fetterhoff 

Mr. Clair Floyd 

Dr. Luke Kauffman 

Dr. John Mayes 

Rev, John Mcintosh 

Mr. Jerry Michael 

Mr. Jim Shipley 



STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL 
CONDITION 
May 31, 1994 

ASSETS: 

Cash and Cash Equivalent .... $ 92,093 

Investments 17,800,621 

Accrued Interest Receivable . . . 312,3451 

Loans Receivable 18,382 582 

Vehicles and Equipment (Net) . . 20,270 

Other Current Assets 8 909 

Total Assets $36,616,820 

LIABILITIES AND FUND 
BALANCE: 

Investment Deposits $34,091,384) 

Accrued Interest Payable 316,493 

Other Liabilities 4 266 

Total Liabilities 34,412,143 

Fund Balance 2,204 677 

Total Liabilities and Fund 

Balance $36,616,820 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

For Year Ended May 31, 1994 
OPERATING INCOME: 

Interest on Loans $ 1,822.458 

Interest on Investments 864,355 

Other Misc. Inc. Net 8,608 

Total Operating Income 2,695,421 

OPERATING EXPENSES: 

Interest on Savings Accounts . $1,917,410 

Salaries and Services 161,198 

Contributions 46 110 

Data Processing 3 Q23 

Other Administrative Expenses . 181,436 

Total Operating Expenses ... 2,309.777 

Other Income and (Expenses) (260,809) 

NET INCOME $ ^4,335 



* Copies of audited statements, also 
containing the auditor's opinion, are available 
at our office at 1401 Kings Highway, Box 
587, Winona Lake, Indiana 46590-0587. 



GRACE BRETHREN FINANCIAL PLANNING SERVICE 

P.O. Box 587, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Phone: 219/267-5161 

(A ministry sponsored by 
The Grace Brethren Home Missions Council, Inc.) 

Director - Mr. Russel Dunlap, P.O. Box 587, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Field Representative - Mr. Ronald Dorner, 8115 Green Valley Rd., Mohave Valley, AZ 86440 

Secretary - Mrs. Phyllis Dunlap, 1782 Country Club Road, Warsaw, IN 46580 

Executive Committee: 

Larry Chamberlain, chairman 

Brenda S. Kent, recording secretary 

Jesse Deloe, James Johnson 



THE BRETHREN MISSIONARY 

HERALD COMPANY, INCORPORATED 

P.O. Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

(219/267-7158) (FAX: 219/267-4745) Herald Newsline: 219/267-7826 



Board of Trustees 

(Term ending 1997) 

Larry Gegner 

H. Don Rough 

Jeff Thomley 

Pat Phillips 

(Term ending 1996) 
E. William Male 
Russell Ogden 
Roy R. Roberts 

(Term ending 1995) 

James Bustraan 

Ralph Colburn 

Gerald Kelley 

Paul Wodruff 

Officers of the Board 

Pres. - James Bustraan 
V. Pres. - E. William Male 

Secy. - H. Don Rough 

Asst. Secy. - Gerald Kelley 

Treas. • Ralph Colburn 

Member-at-Large - Paul Woodruff 

Consultant to the Board 

Charles W. Turner 

Staff 

Publisher & General Manager - 

Jeffry A. Carroll 

Asst. to Gen. Mgr., Finances and Retail 

Sales - Jo Disbro 

Finance Office - Mike Baker 

Sunday School Sales - Tom Miller 

Maintenance - Steve Leslie and Max Fluke 

Mailing Dept. - John Leonard 

Herald Subscriptions and 

Materials - Dolores Gunn 



Herald Bookstore, Winona Lake - 

P.O. Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Store Coordinator • Earl Futch 

LaNita French, Susan Miller 

Herald Bookstore, Indianapolis - 

7858 E. 96th St., Fishers, IN 46038 

(317/842-8942) 

Store Coordinator - Sharon Edgington 

Herald Bookstore, Columbus - 

6347 Sawmill Road, Dublin, OH 43017 

(614/761-3900) 
Store Coordinator - Chris Cavanaugh 

Herald Magazine 

Publisher - Jeffry A. Carroll 
Managing Editor - Jenifer Wilcoxson 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993 



ASSETS 
Current Assets 

Cash & Certificates Deposit $ 88,909.14 

Accounts Receivable 55,176.54 

Marketable Securities 18,823.69 

Inventory-Merchandise 867,914.95 

Mortgage Receivable-Current 4.185.84 

Contract Receivables 663.19 

Prepaid Expenses 6,263.14 

Total Current Assets $1,041,936.49 

Investments 587,334.59 

Non-Current Assets 

Land $ 4,000.00 

Buildings 256,286.93 

Furniture & Fixtures 99,198.25 



Office Equipment 81,702.73 

Vehicles 33^912. 93 

Total 475,100.84 

Less Accumulated Depreciation. . 303,593.91 
Net Property-Equipment 171,506.93 

Other Assets 

Contract Receivables 27,670.38 

Less Current Portion 4,185.84 

Total NC Contract Receivables. . . . 23! 484. 54 

Lease Deposits 9,933.33 

Total Other Assets 33,417 87 

TOTAL ASSETS 1,834,195 88 

LIABILITIES AND NET WORTH 
Current Liabilities 

Accounts Payable 85,546.93 

Notes Payable 108.500 00 

Current Portion-Long Term Debt . . . 2,364.28 

Accrued Interest 570.94 

Sales Tax Payable 5,025 1 1 

Total Current Liabilities 202!o07.26 

Long Term Liabilities 

Notes Payable 12,801,84 

Less Current 2,364.28 

Total Long Term Liabilities 10,437.56 

Other Liabilities 

Gift Annuities 10,000.00 

Total Liabilities 222,444.82 

Fund Balance 1,6117 51 06 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & 

FUND BALANCE 1,834,195.88 



CONDENSED OPERATING STATEMENT 

Income 

Merchandise Sales $1,087,689.85 

Cooperating Boards 27,926.14 

Rentals 3,100.00 

Interest & Miscellaneous 44,108.11 

Sale Fixed Assets/Securities. . . . 258,323.70 

Bequest 50,000.00 

Misc 1,955.44 

Total Business Income . . . $1,473,103.24 

Cost 

Purchases 760,657.20 

Salaries 259,369.03 

Operating Expenses 420,682.29 

Free Literature 4,026.83 

Rental Expense 7,580.79 

Administrative Expense 17,026.34 

Total Business Costs 1,469,342.48 

Total Business Gain (Loss). . . 3,760.76 

Publication Offering 17,301.74 

Expenses 22,520.97 

Offering Net Income (Loss). . . (5,21 9.23) 

TOTAL NET INCOME (LOSS) (1.458.47) 



Note-The books of the Brethren Missionary 
Herald Company are open for inspection by 
any member of the corporation. 



THE BRETHREN WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 



National WMC Officers 1994-1995 

President - Mrs. Geneva Inman 

2244 Fernwood Dr. Colorado Springs, 

CO 80910. (719/597-2620) 
President-Elect - Mrs. Janet Minnix 

3314 Kenwick Trail S.W., Roanoke, VA 

24018. (703/774-4078) 
1st Vice Pres. - Mrs. Alice Hartman 

13532 Cherry Tree Circle, Hagerstown, 

MD 21742-2824. (301/797-7346) 
2nd Vice Pres. - Mrs. Janet Minnix 

3314 Kenwick Trail S.W., Roanoke, VA 

24018. (703/774-4078) 
Secretary - Mrs. Chris Galegor 

Grace Brethren Navajo Ministries, 

Counselor, NM 87018 (505/568-4454) 
Asst. Secy. - Mrs. Linda Michael 

Route 4, 105 Meadow Dr.. Martinsburg, 

WV 25401 . (304/229-2477) 
Financial Secy. - Treas. - Miss Joyce Ashman 

602 Chestnut St., Winona Lake, IN 

46590. (219/267-7588) 
Asst. Fin. Sec. - Treas. - Mrs. Doris Beichler 

10662 Irvin Rd., Creston, OH 44217 

(216/435-6754) 
Prayer Chairman - Mrs. Arlene Smith 



13669 Eaton Pike, New Lebanon. 
OH 45345 (513/687-1763) 
Literature Secy. - Mrs. Lillian Teeter 

2706 Sharon St., Winona Lake, IN 

46590. (219/267-5513) 
Editor - Mrs. Mary Thompson 

405 Administration, Winona Lake, IN 

46590 (219/269-7316) 

District Presidents 1994-1995 

Allegheny - Mrs. Ruth Ella Johnson 

RD. #7, Box 207, Paul Heights, Mt. 

Pleasant, PA 15666. (412/547-3187) 
Chesapeake - Mrs. Lou Ann Myers - Contact 

250 Philadelphia Ave., Waynesboro, PA 

17268 (717/762-3610) 
East Central Florida - Nancy Heldt - Contact 

333 Banyan, Maitland, FL 32751 

(407/834-8923) 
Florida Suncoast - Mrs. Lois McDevitt 

6236 Bayside Dr.., New Port Richey, FL 

34652. (813/845-3100) 
Hawaii - Mrs. Betty Lou Mitchell 

95-035 Waimakua Dr., Mililani, HI 96789 

(808/623-0418) 
Indiana - Mrs. Vickie McNeal 

10211 Areola Road, Ft. Wayne. IN 46818 



Indiana - Mrs. Vickie McNeal 

10211 Areola Road, Ft. Wayne, IN 46818 

(219/625-4147) 
Iowa-Midlands - Miss Susan Schellenberg 

6421 Cimarron Dr., NE, Cedar Rapids, 

IA 52402-1130 (319/378-9253) 
Michigan - Mrs. Linda Erb 

3749 Brown Rd., Lake Odessa, Ml 

48849. (616/374-7423) 
Mid-Atlantic - Mrs. Lou Ann Myers 

250 Philadelphia Ave., Waynesboro, 

PA 17268 (717/762-3610) 
Mountain-Plains - Mrs. Rhonda Massie 

715 N. 25th St., Colorado Springs, CO 

80904 (719/577-9745) 
North Central Ohio - Mrs. Ella Lee Risser 

821 Ohio St., Ashland, OH 44805 

(419/281-0332) 
Northeastern Ohio - Mrs. Doris Beichler 

10662 Irvin Rd., Creston, OH 44217. 

(216/435-6754) 
Northern Atlantic - Mrs. Susan Meyers 

72 Hertzog Dr., Leola, PA 17540. 

(717/656-7459) 
Northwest - Mrs. Dee Schilperoort 

7281 Progressive Rd., Wapato, WA 

98951. 

(509/848-2277) 
South Florida - Mrs. Agnes Metzger 

1513 NW 6 Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

3331 1 (305/462-5280) 
Southern California-Arizona - Helen Miller 

13138 Michelle Circle, Whittier, CA 

90605. 

(310/941-5937) 
Southern Ohio - Mrs. Cheryl Owens 

708 S. Clay St., Troy, OH 45373. 

(513/339-9216) 
Southern - Ms. Marijo Lamb - Contact 

P.O. Box 87, Townville, SC 29689 

(803/287-3580) 
Southwest - Mrs. Chris Galegor 

Grace Brethren Navajo Ministries 

Counselor, NM 87018. 

(505/568-4454 
Virginia - Mrs. Evelyn McDonald 

2343 Cantle Lane, SW, Roanoke, VA 

24018. (703/989-0820) 
West Penn - Mrs. Ruth Blake 

RD. 5, Box 185, Johnstown, PA 15909. 

(814/749-8620) 

1994-1995 
WMC YEARLY GOALS 
1. Read and study the Bible regularly 

2 Be a faithful prayer warrior.* 

3 Active in Evangelism.* 

4. Encourage increased interest in SMM or 

aid in the establishment of SMM in your 
local church. 

5. Give regularly to WMC - time, talent, and 
money as the Lord leads and prospers.* 

6 Support regular family devotions.* 



Use of Daily Devotions is suggested. 
"Refer to WMC Handbook. 

LOCAL GOALS 

1 Observe a special time of prayer on the 
15th day of each month.* 

2. Emphasize prayer for local youth and 
those who made decisions for full-time 
Christian service. 

3. Support district rallies and projects. 

4. Contribute to Major Offerings: 

Please send all money to the National 
Financial Secretary-Treasurer using the 
proper offering slip from the treasurer's 
sheet in the Program Packet. Make 
checks payable to: Grace Brethren 
National WMC. 

A. September, October, November: 
HOME MISSIONS - Funding of the 
Canadian Initiative 

GOAL: $7,000 

Send before December 10th. 

THANK OFFERING - One-On-One 

program for boys 

GOAL: $4,500 

Send before December 10th. 

We suggest a minimum of $1.50 a year 

per member. 

B. December, January, February: 
GRACE Seminary - Hebrew and Greek 
Learning Center 

GOAL: $7,000 

Send before March 10th. 

CE NATIONAL OFFERING 

Sponsorship of Director of Girls' 

Ministries (SMM is the heart of 

WMC) 

GOAL: $6,500 

Send before March 10th. 

C. March, April, May: 

FOREIGN MISSIONS - "Let's Put A 
Roof On It" - the Chateau, France 
GOAL: $7,000 
Send before June 10th. 
MISSIONARIES OF THE YEAR 
Toward the support of WMC 
Missionaries of the Year honoring 
their service. 

*Sue Guiles - Argentina 

"Louise Klawitter - France 

"Sue Peters - C.A.R. 

*Kim Hulett - Philippines 
GOAL: $5,000 

We suggest a minimum of $1.50 per 
member. 
Send before June 10th. 

D. June, July, August: 

WMC OPERATING EXPENSES 
GOAL: $8,000 

Send before September 10th. 
5. Encourage the reading of the following 
books which may be purchased from the 



Brethren Missionary Herald Company, 
Box 544, Winona Lake, IN 46590. 
'Living in God's Kindness by 

Marguerite Dunning 
*When God Doesn't Make Sense 
by James Dobson 
* Women of Catawba by Hilda Stahl 

6. Use Brethren talent when available and 
support Brethren works. Support SMM.* 

7. Aid in expenses, if possible, of local 
president or representative to attend each 
district meeting and national WMC 
Conference. 

8 Elect officers in April or May to assume 
their duties in September. The local 
Annual Reports compiled by the retiring 
local president must be in the hands of 
the district president by May 31. Seating 
of the delegates at National Conference is 
permissible only if annual report is 
returned. Reports will not be accepted at 
National Conference. 

9 Keep membership cards current, if your 
council chooses to use them.* (These 
cards are available from the National 
Literature Secretary) 

10 Refer often to the WMC Handbook. 
This can be obtained from the National 
Literature Secretary, Box 711, Winona 
Lake, IN 46590 (See order blank 
enclosed in program packet.) We 
recommend one per council be purchased. 

* Refer to WMC Handbook. 

DISTRICT GOALS 

1. Honor those reading the entire Bible or 
listening to tapes of the entire Bible within 
a year. 

2. Recognize the SMM at a District WMC 
program. 

3. Use Brethren talent when available 
and support Brethren works. 

4. Send District newspaper to National 
President, National Editor, and District 
Editors. 

5. Sponsor at least one project, which 
should be cleared through the National 
First Vice President to avoid duplication. The 
project may be kept within the 
district, but the First Vice President should 
be advised for completion of her report. 
Send before March 10. 

6. Send all district offerings for national 
Brethren works to the National Financial 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

7. Contribute an annual freewill offering, to 
be used as the committee in charge sees 
the need, toward furnishing and repair of 
the Brethren Foreign Missionary Residence 
in Winona Lake, Indiana. Send to the 
National Financial Secretary- Treasurer. 

8. Assist with or pay the District Presidents 



expenses to National Conference. 

9. Give financial assistance to the Distnct SMM 
Coordinator so she may attend the District 
Coordinator's Workshop. 

10. Contribute annually to the National 
Operating Expenses. Send to the National 
Financial Secretary-Treasurer by September 
10th. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 1993-1994 

Balance on Hand - July 1, 1993 $ 6,164.71 

RECEIPTS: 

Operation Account $ 24.080.76 

Home Missions 6,307.01 

Grace Schools 5,592.08 

Foreign Missions 6,739.32 

Thank Offering 4,291.53 

Missionary of the Year 4,846.81 

Missionary Residence 3,014.43 

Home Missions Specials 3,774.76 

Foreign Missions Specials . . . 6,178.32 

SMM - CE National 4,129.54 

CE National Specials 1,488.28 

Grace Schools Specials 1,400.00 

Prepaid Income and Expense.. 5,727.30 

Day With The Conways 4,557.00 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $82,127.14 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Operation Account $ 22,789.43 

Home Missions 6,307.01 

Grace Schools 5,592.08 

Foreign Missions 6,739.32 

Thank Offering 4,291.53 

Missionary of the Year 5,187.28 

Missionary Residence 997.83 

Home Missions Specials 3,774.76 

Foreign Missions Specials . . 6,178.32 

SMM - CE National 4,129.54 

CE National Specials 1,488.28 

Grace Schools Specials 1,400.00 

Prepaid Income and Expense . 7.028.24 

Day With The Conways 5,480.49 

Task Force 1.250.22 

TOTAL 

DISBURSEMENTS... $81,384.11 

Balance on Hand - June 30, 1994 $ 6,907.74 

RECAPITULATION OF CASH ACCOUNT 

Balance on Hand - June 30. 1994 $ 6,907.74 

Operation Account (1,561.45) 

Missionary of the Year Account 4,846.83 
Missionary Residence Account . . 3,016.60 
Prepaid Income & Expense 

Account 605.76 

TOTAL $ 6,907.74 

Total Investment & Interest in the 

GBIF not included in the above: $ 13,387.05 



SMM 



Motto- "Serving my Master " 



Purpose: To train girls to live Godly lives in an 
ungodly world and to reach their world for 
Christ. 



Southern California-Arizona: Helen Miller, 
13138 Michelle Cir , Whittier, CA 90605. 
310/941-5937 



Sponsored by:CE National, Inc. 
P.O. Box 365 
Winona Lake, IN 46590 

District Coordinators 

Allegheny: Kathy Opel, 23 Patricia Ln., 
Uniontown, PA 15401. 
412/437-0422 

East Central FL: Yvonne Maxson, 14655 NE 
24th PI. #52, Silver Springs. FL 34488. 
904/625-3043 

Indiana: Bettie Horner, 5808 Council Ring 
Blvd., Kokomo, IN 46902. 
317/453-1671 

Iowa-Midlands: Rose Earnest, 2657 Cedar 
Terrace Dr., Waterloo, IA 50702. 
319/296-2261 

Michigan: Marjone Bjork, 7929 Clarksville Rd., 
Clarksville, Ml 48815 
616/693-2568 



Denise Wallace, 617 N. Cobblestone St., 
Gilbert, AZ 85234. 602/497-5845 

Southern Ohio: Marilyn Kirkpatrick, 100 
Studebaker Ct., Brookville, OH 45309. 
513/833-4741 

Southern: Sandy Jacobs, 113 Jacob Rd., 
Anderson, SC 29625. 
803/287-41 74 

Virginia: Edith Staton, Rt. 2, Box 136 A, 
Fairfield, VA 24435 
703/261-2228 

West Penn.: Nora Beltz, Rd.1 Box 485A 
Hollidaysburg, PA 16648. 
814/695-3543 



1994-1995 
SMM OFFERING GOALS 



Mid-Atlantic: Shelby Oliver, 90 East Ave., P.O. 
Box 421, State Line, PA 17263. 
717/597-2223 

Mountain Plains: Sue Dishaw, 1741 
Chautaugua Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 
80915. 719/380-8534 

North Atlantic: Jane Kurtz, 791 Hopeland Rd., 
Lititz, PA 17543. 
717/738-1521 

North Central Ohio: Oleda Hirsch, 3041 E. 
Mound St., Columbus, OH 43209. 
614/231-5846 

North East Ohio: Chery Boehm, 1410 
Meadowlawn Dr., Macedonia, OH 44056. 
216/467-6123 

Northwest: Sally Stamm, 507 S. Juniper St., 
Toppenish, WA 98948. 
509/865-3877 



Foreign Missions: Goal is $800 
(Due November 10, 1994) 

England - puppets, skits, tapes $250 

Mexico - computer program $175 

Argentina - video tapes $200 

Brazil - Bibles $175 

Operation SMM: Goal is $800 
(Due January 10, 19951 
To support the operating expenses of SMM 

Home interest: Goal is $600 
(Due March 10, 1995/ 
Philadelphia, PA - Printer $250 

Tampa, FL - Mailing of tracts $100 

McAllen, TX - Toward purchase of 

a sound system $250 

CE National: Goal is $1000 
(Due May 10, 1995) 

Operation Barnabas keyboard $500 

VCR/TV Monitor $500 



GRACE BRETHREN MEN INTERNATIONAL 



Please direct all correspondence for: 
Grace Brethren Men International 
Yoke Fellow Ministries or 
Grace Brethren Boys to: 

6661 Worthington-Galena Road 
Worthington, OH 43085 
614/848-9994 

Pastoral Advisor 

James L. Custer, Grace Brethren Church 
6661 Worthington-Galena Road 
Worthington, OH 43085 

Board of Directors 
Members-at-Large 

Pres. - Jerry Michael, 105 Meadow Dr 

Martinsburg, WV 25401. 304/229-2477 

V. Pres, - Randy Meyers, 72 Hertzoq Dr Leola 

PA 17540. 717/656-7459 
Secy. - Marlin Rose, 384 E. CR 300 N 

Warsaw, IN 46580. 219/267-7320 
Treas. - Morgan Burgess, 163 N. Franklin St 

Delaware, OH 43015. 614/369-2455 
John Hetrick (95), 575 Portside Drive North 

Port, FL 34287. 
Clark Miller (95), 13138 Michelle Circle Whittier 

CA 90605. 
Ray Sturgill (96), H.C.R. 79, Box 219, Clayhole 

KY 41317. 606/666-7767 

District Representatives 
to the Board of Directors 
Allegheny- 
Robert Grew, R.1, Meyersdale PA 15552 

814/634-8945 
Arctic- 

Clair Floyd, 11251 Lipscomb St., Anchoraqe 
AK 99516. 907/346-3580 ' 

East Central Florida- 
W. Ted Bland, 1876 Spruce Creek Blvd., 
E., Daytona Beach, FL 32124 
904/756-7850 
Florida Suncoast- 
John Hetrick, 575 Portside Dr., North Port 

FL 34287. 813/426-4549 
Indiana- 
Tom McKinley, Indian Heights Grace 
Brethren Church, 725 E. Center Rd 
Kokomo, IN 46902. 317/453-2048 
Iowa-Mid lands- 
Jimmy Millhollin, 327 S.E. Porter, Des 

Moines, IA 50315. 515/285-1186 
Michigan- 
Tom Johnson, 531 Grant St., Niles Ml 

49120. 616/683-5479 
Mid-Atlantic- 
Jerry Michaels, R. 4, 104 Meadows Dr 
Martinsburg, WV 25401 
304/229-2477 
Mountain-Plains- 
Michael Paulus, 1755 Camel Dr., Colorado 
Springs, CO 80910, 719/574-0799 



Northcentral Ohio- 
Ed Jackson, 6661 Worthington-Galena Road 

Worthington, OH 43085 614/848-9994 
Northeastern Ohio- 
Elmer Gable, 11849 Keener Rd., Orrville 

OH 44667. 216/682-1922 
Northern Atlantic- 
Sam Leisey, 101 E. Main St. Box 17, 

Adamstown, PA 19501. 
North west- 
Lyle Taylor, R.3, Box 3184, Wapato WA 

98951. 509/848-2268 
Southern- 
Ron Batroff, 2820 Hidden Forest Ct., 

Marietta, GA 30066. 404/426-1682 
Southern California-Arizona- 
Clark Miller, 13138 Michelle Circle 

Whittier, CA 90605. 
South Florida- 
James Bustraan, Grace Brethren Church, 

1800 N.W. 9th Ave., Fort Lauderdale' 

FL 33311. 305/763-6766 
Southern Ohio- 
Ray Sturgill, H.C.R. 79, Box 219, Clayhole 

KY 41317. 606/666-7767 
Western Pennsylvania- 
Rodney Lingenfelter, 104 Nason Dr., 

Roaring Springs, PA 16673. 

Director of Grace Brethren Boys 

Roger Mills 
614/861-5810 

Director of Yokefellow Ministries 

Ed Jackson 
614/848-9994 

District Representatives 
Allegheny- 
Dick Battis, 10 Waynesburg Rd., 

Washington, PA 15301. 
Indiana- 
Harold Stayer, 304 E. Main St., Flora IN 

46929. 
lowa-Midlands- 
Gilbert Hawkins, Pleasant Grove Grace 

Brethren Church, R. 1, Box 33, North 

English, IA 52316. 
Northern Atlantic- 
Pete Caldwell, R. 1, Windsor, PA 17366. 
Northwest- 
Lyle Taylor, R. 3, Box 3184, Wapato, WA 

98951. 
North Central Ohio- 
Roger Mills, 118 Salem Ct., Reynoldsburq 

OH 43068. 
North East Ohio- 
Harry Speicher, 13283 Doylestown Rd.. 

Rittman, OH 44270. 
Southern California-Arizona- 
Clark Miller, 13138 Michelle Circle, 

Whittier, CA 90605. 
Virginia- 
Fred Devan, 5922 Brethren Rd., Roanoke 
VA 24014. 



BRETHREN EVANGELISTIC MINISTRIES 



Executive Director 

Ron E. Thompson, 3580 Robin Hood Circle, 

Roanoke, VA 24019 

Off: 703/992-6595 

Home: 703/992-4445 

Assistant to Director 

Tony DeRosa ('97) 

9018 Tarrytown Ave. 

Whittier, CA 90605 

310/693-2949 

Send all gifts to: 

P.O. Box 333, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Directors 

Ed DeZago ('97) 

1281 Nimbus Dr. 

North Port, FL 34287-5208 

813/426-7198 

Lee H. Dice (95) 

1909 Neal Dr., Wooster OH 44691 

Office: 216/264-9459 

Home: 216/345-7826 

Earl Dohner (97) 

584 Westbrook Rd., Brookville, OH 45309 

Office: 513-833-4214 

Home: 513-833-4288 

Phil Guerena ('97) 

9550 Oak St. Apt 102 

Bellflower, CA 90706-5229 

Office: 213/634-5587 

Home: 310/920-7956 



Stephen Jarrell ('96) 

24 S. Juniata St., Everett, PA 15537 

Office: 814/652-2811 

Home: 814/652-2995 

Bill Kellerman ('95) 

2978 Hidden Forest Court 

Marietta, GA 30066 

Office: 404/422-8210 

Home: 404/427-7859 

Kim Robertson ('96) 

103 Woodside Cir., Stephens City, VA 22655 

Office: 703/667-9399 

Home: 703/869-7262 

Sheldon Shetter ('95) 

1244 Elm Ave., Lancaster, PA 17603 

Home: 717/291-8982 

Fred Sorrick ('96) 

4569 N. Hedgerow Drive 

Allentown, PA 18103 

Office: 215/434-4201 

Home: 215/398-7259 

Lyle Sweeney ('97) 
397 Shelby Ave. W. 
Powell, OH 43065 
Office: 614/438-5580 
Home: 614/889-7495 

Warren Zellner ('96) 

103 East 12th Street 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Home: 219/267-8948 



NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 

BRETHREN RETIREMENT HOMES, INC. 

GRACE VILLAGE HEALTH CARE FACILITY, INC. 

ROBIN HOOD LEISURE HOMES 



P.O. Box 337 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

219/372-6200 

GRACE VILLAGE 
BOAD OF DIRECTORS - 1993-1994 

Brad Skiles, Chairman (1994) 

1309 E. Center Street, Warsaw, IN 46580 

219/269-6592 

Dr. Mark Jensen, MC 

Vice Chairman (1995) 

P.O. Box 1036, Warsaw, IN 46580 

219/267-7667; Office 219/267-8940 

Beverly Worth, Treasurer (1993) 

P.O. Box 725, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

Office: 219/269-4687 



Elaine Brenneman, Secretary (1995) 

P.O. Box 804, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

219/269-2281 

Roger Hansen (1993) 

DePuy 

P.O. Box 988, Warsaw, IN 46580 

Office: 219/372-7415 

Dr. W. Remington, MD (1995) 
850 Lydia Drive, Warsaw, IN 46580 
219/267-4083; Office: 219/267-3204 

Nancy Zellner (1994) 

103 E. 12th St., Winona Lake, IN 46590 

219/267-8948 

Raeann Hart (1994) 

P.O. Box 773, Winona Lake, IN 46590 

219/269-1288 



Arne Stahl (1995) 

8592 Freeport Ave., Freeport, Ml 49325 

616/868-7266 

Steve Mason CPA (1994) 

1928 E. Center St., Warsaw, IN 46580 

219/269-3768; Office 219/267-4121 

Sandra Frush (1994) 
P.O. Box 432, Pierceton, IN 46562 
219/594-2539; Office 219/269-2102 



Ron Henry (1995) 

407 Kings Highway 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 

219/267-7936; 

Office: 219/372-5100 

Barb Dagnall (1993) 

800 N. Park Ave., 

Warsaw, IN 46580 

219/267-2012 



GRACE SCHOOLS 
200 Seminary Drive, Winona Lake, IN 46590-1294 



General Administration 

Ronald E. Manahan, President 
David R. Plaster, Vice President of 

Academic Affairs 
William Darr, Director of Library Services 
Jim Shipley, Registrar and Director of College 

Adult Education 
Kathryn Scanland, Director of Marketing 

Enrollment Services 

Carl Beridon, Vice President of 
Enrollment/ Advancement Services 

Ron Henry, Dean of Enrollment 

Holli Durham, Director of College Enrollment 

Chris Becker, Director of Seminary Enrollment 
Services 

Student Services 

Roger Peugh, Vice President of Campus Life/ 

Chaplain 
James Swanson, Dean of Student Life 
E.J. Underwood, Associate Dean of Student 

Life 
Philip Dick, Director of Athletics 
Kerri Dolbear, Housing Coordinator 
Jennifer Christenberry, Director of Student 

Academic Services 
Joanne Taylor, School Nurse 

Business and Financial Matters 

Charles H. Bassford, Vice President of 

Business Affairs 
Paul DeRenzo, Director of Food Service 
Audrey Tobias, Director of Computer/Telecom 

Services 
Steven Fleagle, Controller 

Advancement Department 

Carl J. Beridon, Vice President of 

Enrollment/ Advancement Services 
Steve Wishart, Director of Alumni Affairs 
Tom Abbitt, Director of Planned Giving 
Joan Lesh, Director of Constituent Services 



Officers of the Corporation 
President - Dr. Ronald E. Manahan 
Secretary /Treasurer-Mr. Charles H. Bassford 
Assistant Secretary-Mr. Larry Downs 

Board of Trustees 

(Term ending 1995) 
Rev. John Burke, 1434 Lyon, Waterloo, IA 

50702-3440 
Mr. John Haller, 5447 Wine Tavern, Dublin, 

OH 43017 
Mr. Terrell Holsinger, 1209 Princess Lane, 

Hurst, TX 72686 
Rev. Kenneth Koontz, 855 Trumball, 

Deltona, FL 32725 
Mr. Alan Pietzsch, 6856 Rieber Street, 

Worthington, OH 43085-2427 
+ Mr. William Snoddy, Secretary, 1530 

Center Lane Drive, Ashland, OH 44805 
Mr. H. Dwight Stair, 510 Oak Street, 

Wadsworth, OH 44281 

(Term ending 1996) 
Mr. Larry Downs, 4 Stone Camp Trail, 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 
Mr. William Hoffmann, 1 1 5 Vernon Ave., 

Ashland, OH 44805-4042 
Dr. Nickolas Kurtaneck, 6153 Pershing Way, 

Buena Park, CA 90260-1416 
Dr. William Munsey, 8260 Greentree Dr., 

Westerville, OH 43081 
Rev. Les Nutter, 509 Cherry Street, 

Wrightsville, PA 17368 
+ Mrs. Miriam Pacheco, 413 Kings Highway, 

Winona Lake, IN 46590 
+ Rev. Charles G. Thornton, chairman, 56 

North Crawford, Millersburg, OH 44564 
+ Rev. Galen Wiley, 22713 Ellsworth 

Avenue, Minerva, OH 44657 

(Term ending 1997) 
+Rev. Thomas Avey, vice chairman, 1419 
Jerry Lane, Manheim, PA 17545-9351 



Rev. Richard Battis, 19302 County Road T, 

Cortez, CO 81321 
Rev. Raymond Davis, 13519 Cherry Tree 

Circle, Hagerstown, MD 21742-2867 
Mr. Ralph Fife, 10360 Amsterdam Rd., 

Waynesboro, PA 17268 
Rev. John Gregory, 14 Donnertown Ln., 

Duncansville, PA 16635 
Dr. Donald Hedrick, 15033 Lodosa Drive, 

Whittier, CA 90605-1231 
Mr. Thomas Homey, 2811 Prospect N.E., 

Box 59, Middlebranch, OH 44652-0059 
Mr. Gordon Stover, 9210 Branch Rd., 

Harrah, WA 98933 
Mr. Michael Workman, 2763 N. Millborne 

Rd., Wooster, OH 44691 



Trustee Emeritus 
Rev. Paul E. Dick, 1912 E. Walnut Street, 
Warsaw, IN 46580 



^-Members and officers of the Executive 
Committee 



1994-1995 
Faculty Members and 
Administrative Officers 



Abegg, Martin G. (Dr.), Associate Pro- 
fessor, Biblical Languages 
Anderson, Ethel L (Mrs.), Associate Pro- 
fessor, Mathematics 
Avallone, Anthony J., Associate Professor 

of Business 
Bassford, Charles H., Vice President for 

Business Affairs 
Benyousky, Frank, Associate Professor of 

Communications 
Beridon, Carl, Vice President of 

Advancement/Enrollment Services 
Bickel, Kenneth, Assistant Professor for 

Pastoral Ministries 
Bowling, James (Dr.), Professor of 

Education 
Curry, Shara B. (Mrs.), Associate Professor 

of Education 
Darr, William E., Director of Library 

Services 
Davis, Arthur W., Associate Professor of 

Art 
Davis, John J. (Dr.), Professor of Old 

Testament 
Decker, Allyn, Assistant Professor of 

Communications 
DeYoung, Donald B. (Dr.), Professor of 

Physics and Math 



Dick, E. Philip, Director of Athletics; 

Associate Professor of Health & Physical 

Education 
Dilling, Linda (Mrs.), Assistant Professor 

of Foreign Languages 
Dilling, Richard A. (Dr.), Professor of 

Mathematics 
Edgington, Thomas J. (Dr.), Associate 

Professor of Psychology 
Faber, Ardis (Miss), Assistant Professor 

of Music 
Felts, Verna M. (Mrs.), Associate Professor 

of Music (Piano) 
Forbes, W. Merwin (Dr.), Professor of 

Biblical Studies 
Fortosis, Robert, Associate Professor of 

Physical Education & Head Soccer Coach 
Gaerte, Dennis, Associate Professor of 

Teacher Education 
Gano, Peter (Dr.), Adjunct Professor of 

Fine Arts 
Gordon, William P.. Associate Professor 

of Economics and Business 
Gorrell. David, Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 
Gray, Anita (Miss), Associate Director 

of Libraries 
Grill, E. Michael (Dr.), Professor of 

Psychology 
Henry, Ron, Dean of Enrollment 
Hildebrandt, Theodore (Dr.), Professor 

of Biblical Studies 
Hochstedler, Jeff, Assistant Professor 

of Art 
Jeffreys, Richard E. (Dr.), Professor of 

Biochemistry 
Johnson, Darrell L. (Dr.), Professor of 

Physical Education 
Kessler, James C, Associate Professor of 

Health and Physical Education & Men's 

Basketball Coach 
Lee, Marcia (Dr.), Associate Professor 

of Biological Science 
Lovelady, Edgar J. (Dr.), Professor of 

English and Greek 
Manahan, Ronald E. (Dr.), President, 

Professor of Biblical Studies 
Mignon, Beth, Women's Basketball 

Coach, Women's Director of Athletics, 

Part-time Instructor in Health and 

Physical Education, Asst. Track Coach 
Peugh, Roger, Vice President of 

Campus Life / Chaplain 
Plaster, David R., Vice President of 

Academic Affairs, Associate Professor of 

Theology 
Sauders, Paulette (Dr.), Professor of 

English 



Schram, Jacqueline, Assistant Professor 

of Foreign Languages 
Shipley, Jim A,, Registrar and Director 

of College Adult Education 
Slaughter, George F. (Dr.), Professor of 

Psychology 
Snider, R. Wayne, Professor of History 
Swanson, James, Dean of Students 
Zimmerman, Timothy, Chair for Music 

Department and Artist-in-Residence 

Emeritus Faculty 

Beaver, S. Wayne (Dr.), Professor Emeritus 



Boyer, James L (Dr.), Professor Emeritus 
Coverstone, Jean (Mrs.), Professor Emeritus 
Felts, W. Roland, Professor Emeritus 
Hamilton, Mabel (Mrs.), Librarian Emeritus 
Hoyt, Herman A. (Dr.), President Emeritus 
Humberd, Jesse (Dr.), Professor Emeritus 
Kent, Homer A., Jr., President/Professor 

Emeritus 
Knegbaum, Arnold R., Dean of Students 

Emeritus 
Male, E. William, Professor Emeritus 
Uphouse, Miriam M. (Mrs.), Associate Dean 

of Students Emeritus 



Condensed Financial Report 

Statement of Revenues, 

Expenditures, and Transfers 

For the Year Ended May 31, 1994 



REVENUES: 
Educational & General: 

Tuition & Fees $ 5,861,959 

Gifts 989,462 

Endowment income 19,666 

Other 80,222 

Total educational and 

9eneral $ 6,951,309 

Auxiliary Enterprises: 

Housing $ 901,291 

Food Service 884,787 

Other 389,236 

Total auxiliary 

enterprises $ 2,175,314 

Other sources $ 67,020 

TOTAL REVENUES $9,193 643 



EXPENDITURES: 
Educational & General: 

Instruction $ 1,956,490 

Academic support 383,272 

Student services 976,508 

Institutional support 1,744,241 

Operation of plant 577,035 

Student aid 1,429,183 

Transfers 155,026 

Total educational and 

general $ 7,221,756 

Auxiliary Enterprises: 

Housing $ 681 ,933 

Food Service 742,501 

Other 447,453 

Total auxiliary 

enterprises $ 1,871,887 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $ 9,093,643 

SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 100,000 



CE NATIONAL 

P.O. Box 365 (1003 Presidential Drive), Winona Lake, IN 46590 

(219/267-6622) (FAX 219/269-7185) (E-mail: cenational) 



Purpose Statement 

The purpose of CE National is to impact the 
church by serving as a catalyst for biblically 
accurate and culturally relevant ministries to 
children, youth, and adults. 

CE National Staff 

Ed Lewis - Executive Director 

Chery Otermat - Director of Girls' 

Ministries and Ministry Teams 

(SMM, TIME, OB) 

Jesse DeBoest - Director of Finance 

and Personnel 
Angie Fagner - BNYC Coordinator 
Mike Sessler - Media Coordinator 



MaryBeth Kaylor - Executive Assistant 
Julia Miller, Sherilyn Rank - 

Administrative Assistants 
Lori Beltran - Receptionist & Resource 

Network Coordinator 

Peggy Owens - Materials Coordinator 

Viki Rife - Staff Writer/Editor 

Jan Salsgiver - Church Relations Coordinator 

Walter and Pearl Olszewski - Volunteers 

Board Members 

Steve Peters, President ('96) 

Community Grace Brethren Church 
2261 South Miami 
West Milton. OH 45383 



Dan Allan, Vic© President ('95) 
Grace Brethren Church 
1144 W. Main 
Ashland, OH 44805 

Richard Todd, Secretary (96) 

Community Grace Brethren Church 
11000 E. Washington Blvd. 
Whittier, CA 90606 

Denny Brown, At Large ('95) 
Brethren Jr.-Sr. High School 
5172 Orange Ave. 
Cypress, CA 90630 

Mike Brubaker ('96) 

First Grace Brethren Church 
648 Knorr St. (at Oxford Ave.) 
Philadelphia, PA 19111 

Greg Howell ('97) 

Community Grace Brethren Church 
1180 S. Roosevelt St. 
Goldendale, WA 98620 

Paul Mutchler ('95) 

Grace Brethren Church 
501 W. Lincoln Ave. 
Utitz, PA 17543 

Bud Olszewski ('97) 

Grace Brethren Church 
44 S. First St. 
Rittman, OH 44370 

Bob Peercy ('97) 

5611 Rockledge Dr. 
Buena Park, CA 90621 

Jeff Gill (Pastoral Consultant) 
Grace Brethren Church 
375 Hills-Miller Rd. 
Delaware, OH 43015 

Financial reports are available 
from CE National 

Cabinets 

Many people serve on committees to plan anc 
implement programs, seminars, materials or 
training to assist churches in various areas. 
The following groups meet regularly. 
YouthNet Commission 
Children's Cabinet 
SMM Cabinet 
Boys' Curriculum Task Force 
Christian Education Round Table 
BNYC Program Planning Committee 



Consultants are persons willing to assist GBC 
people in various areas. In addition to the 
Resource Network available through CE 
National, these are names of persons CE 
National uses in various areas: 



Administration of Children's Ministries/ 

Preschool/Nursery: Nancy Neer 
Adoption/Foster Parenting/Home Schooling: 

Greg and Colleen Howell 
Adult Bible Fellowship: John Teevan 
Bible Study Curriculum/Discipleship: 

Dan Travis 
Bible Quizzing: E. Scott Feather 
Camping/One-on-One (Boys' Club Ministries): 

Rick Strappello 
Candidating: Terry Taylor 
Career & Singles/College: Steve Edmonds 
Children's Church/Children's Resources: 

Rich Russell 
Christian Schools: John Mayes 
Christians in Politics: Ron Cohen 
Church Growth/Meta-Church Philosophy: 

Jeff Thornley 
Church Policies: Tom Avey 
Counseling: Buzz Inboden 
Evangelism Training: Lee Dice 
General CE/Daycare Ministries: Paul Mutchler 
Internationals Ministries: Ivanildo Trinidade 
Leadership Development: Jeff Gill 
Local Church Media: Mike Sessler 
Marriage & Family Ministries: John and Jane 

Teevan 
Masterplanning/Computer/E-Mail: Ed Trenner 
NAC (Nurturing Abilities for Christ): Dave Rank 
Neighborhood Bible Clubs (NBC):Fran Anthony 
Pastor's Wives: Margie Brubaker 
Personal and Church Finances: J. Edward 

Weber 
Puppets: Harry Phillips 
Revival/Renewal: Dave Bogue 
Senior Citizens: Bob Dell 
SMM (Girls' Club Ministries)/Ministry Teams: 

Chery Otermat 
Sonlife Training in Youth Ministries: Mike 

Richards 
Spiritual Gifts and Ministry Implications: Doug 

Forsythe 
Women's Ministries: Ruth Dunkle 
Worship Music/Services: Darrell Cummmgs 
Youth Curriculum/Resource Materials: 
Jay Firebaugh 



NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
OF GRACE BRETHREN MINISTERS 



Pres. - John Teevan 

Pres. -Elect - Raymond Davis 

Recording Secretary - Greg Ryerson 



Asst. Recording Secretary - Tim Coyle 
Executive Secretary - Ralph Colburn 
Asst. Executive Secretary - Lee Dice 



MINUTES AND NOTES OF 
MINISTERIUM, July 26, 1994 

Promptly at 9: 1 5, the meeting opened with 
singing led by Bernle Simmons with Ron 
Thompson at the keyboard. 

President John Schumacher welcomed the 
men, and asked his brother-in-law, Bill Smith, to 
lead us in prayer, 

Ralph Colburn presented the membership 
list, and a motion prevailed to accept this list, 
subject to additions and corrections made in 
writing. 

He also presented the financial report, which 
showed a net gain in available funds, in spite of 
9 death gratuities paid during the year, and a gift 
of $10,000 toward Board Members of Grace 
Village legal expense. A motion prevailed to 
accept this report. 

Vice president John Teevan presented a 
proposal to change the constitution of 
mimstenum. Article V, section 5, to read: "All 
officers shall be elected for a term of two years, 
except the executive secretary and his assistant, 
who shall be elected for a three year term." 
Since this involves a constitutional change, it will 
be discussed and voted upon Wednesday or 
Thursday. 

Written Memorials were presented for Donald 
F. Carter and M. Lee Myers, and personal 
comments concerning these men were added by 
Harold Dunning and Jim Custer. John 
Schumacher added comments about Chaplain 
Don Carter. Both Don and Lee were valued 
members of this organization and will be greatly 
missed. 

John Schumacher recognized and welcomed 
Bill Schaffer, perhaps our oldest member, who is 
present for conference. Bill is legally blind, but 
still active in the Kenai GBC in Alaska. A round 
of applause welcomed him. 

Jeff Thornley of Waldorf, MD introduced the 
Vision Seminar with its goal of getting more 
young men into pastoral training by getting 
Grace College and Seminary into each local 
church. Each afternoon at 2:30 a special 
presentation will be made. 

Wayne Hannah, chairman of the nominating 
committee, presented the ballot and conducted 
the election of officers for the coming year. 

Lee Dice, president of Brethren Evangelistic 
Ministries, introduced some new emphases in 
their ministry, assisted by Ron Thompson, 
Director, and board members Ed DeZago and 
Kim Robertson. Folders of this vital ministry had 
been distributed to the men as they came in. 

Our chairman introduced Knute Larson as 
our special guest speaker today, to give the first 
of four presentations he was making at our 
conference this day. Knute is the senior pastor 
of The Chapel in Akron, Ohio, a large 
independent church with a great ministry. He 
spoke of: 



FIVE IMPORTANT HABITS OF A HEALTHY 
CHURCH 

1. GRACE, enjoying what God does for us 
Able to understand, explain the cross. 
Put the cross in all sermons. 

Stand as a fellow struggler. 

2. WORSHIP, exalting God and His Word 
Make worship a top priority, not preliminary. 
Remember the difference between what God 

says and what I think . 
Plan so emotions have time, too. 

3. COMMUNITY, enlisting people in groups 
Celebration, can accomodate unlimited 

number 
Congregation. 20-90 people, know one 

another 
Cell. 3-9 people, accountability, growth 
Plan structures for this. 

4. MISSION, emphasizing why we are here. 
Write and communicate a clear mission 

statement (a leadership task) 
Free people to carry it out. 
Consider a 50-50 church: 50% of funds 
operate the local church, 50% outside. 
5 INTEGRITY, encouraging oneness 
Confront your own heart first. I am 

responsible for me, for my actions. 
Nurture and confront other leaders 
Be aware of four main sin areas for the 
pastor: 

Lukewarmness 

Cynicism 

Utilitarianism-treating people as things 

Selfishness 

Thanks was expressed to Knute for his 
candid and timely message and ministry as we 
adjourned for the morning Bible hour at which he 
would also speak. 

MINUTES AND NOTES OF 
MINISTERIUM, July 27, 1994 

Bernie Simmons led us in song, with Ron 
Thompson on the keyboard. John Gillis led in 
the opening prayer. 

Ralph Colburn presented the following 
motions, each of which was seconded and 
approved: 

1. Moved that the minutes of yesterday's 
session be approved as printed in the "Epistle." 

2. Moved that additions and corrections to 
the membership list be approved as printed in 
the "Epistle." 

3. Moved that since the Executive Committee 
of the Ministenum is actively seeking a solution 
for the membership for Brethren Ministers whose 
churches are not a part of a district at this point 
in time, ministers from such churches be granted 
the full courtesies of membership until this issue 
is resolved. (This action will seat Chris Ball and 
Chaplain Dayne Nix of Arvada, CO. who are 
present at this conference, and others who may 
attend from one or two other churches). 



Ralph then made an announcement that 
Jack Kelley, brother or Pastor Brad Kelley of 
Lynchburg, VA had a severe heart attack and is 
in surgery this morning at Cleveland Clinic. He 
led in prayer for Jack, and for all the family at 
this crisis time. 

Chairman Schumacher presented the 
proposed change in the constitution introduced 
by John Teevan yesterday, amending Article V, 
section 5 to read: "All officers shall be elected 
for a two year term, except the executive 
secretary and his assistant, who shall be elected 
for 3 year terms." 

No opposition to the motion was offered in 
discussion time, so the motion prevailed with 
one dissenting vote. 

A later motion prevailed that this 
constitutional change be effective with this year's 
election. 

John Teevan presented a member 
information sheet and asked us all to fill them 
out and return them to him. 

He then gave opportunity for introductions 
which included: Don Eshelman introduced Ralph 
Molyneux, new pastor at Roanoke Washington 
Heights; Ralph Colburn introduced Dale Brock, 
former Brethren Chaplain and pastor, now 
involved in Servicemen's Overseas Christian 
Centers: Marvin Goodman introduced a brother 
from C.A.R. who is attending Grace Seminary, 
Augustin Hibaile. 

The results of yesterday's election were 
announced: 

President-Elect: Ray Davis 
Secretary: Greg Ryerson 
Assistant: Tim Coyle 
Chairman Schumacher thanked the current 
officers for their faithfulness and a round of 
applause was given them. 

Galen Wiley reported for last year's 
committee coordinating and strengthening our 
licensure and ordination examining procedures. 
A printed report was distributed to all men with 
a much expanded report available for all 
examining board representatives and mission 
field representatives. 

Ralph Colburn presented the day's 
memorials for Bud Thompson and True Hunt. 
Charles Ashman shared some special 
recollections and made significant observations 
concerning Bud; and Tim Boal, who grew up 
under the ministry of True Hunt and eloquently 
nominated him for "Pastor of the Year" in 1993, 
spoke in behalf of his pastor. 

John Schumacher introduced Ron Manahan, 
President of Grace Schools, who shared his 
heart and burden for enlisting and training young 
men for the ministry, and for fulfilling the Great 
Commission. New printed information on the 
schools was available to all men. 

John Teevan then presented our President, 
John Schumacher, for his message to us. John 
prefaced his message by singing beautifully, 
"People Need the Lord." He then explained his 



message was a continuation and outgrowth of 
last year's introduction and the discussion 
groups that followed on ethics in the ministry. 
After reading I Tim. 3:1-7, he suggested three 
main points: 

1. WHAT WE DEMAND OF OURSELVES 

In the light of the O.J. Simpson case, a 
commentator stated, "People want their heroes 
to be good people. And they need their heroes 
to be good people." The late Bob Thompson 
commented, "We don't have very many heroes 
these days." That's a sad but true fact of life. 
People expect and deserve from us a standard 
of behavior worthy of our role as pastors. Notice 
Jesus' frequent commands to "Follow" and 
Paul's exhortation to imitate Him. It can't be 
done without a total commitment to Christ and 
His Word. And people will be affected, for good 
or bad, by the way we live. 

2. WHAT WE HAVE A RIGHT TO EXPECT OF 

EACH OTHER 

How do we impact each other'' Think of the 
impact we could have if our sincere desire was 
to show genuine concern for one another. 
Paul's writings are laced with love and 
encouragement for others. Jesus' command to 
us was to "love one another" unconditionally! 
That quality of love in the early Christians 
impacted the Roman world perhaps more than 
the teachings they embraced. Let us disagree if 
we must, but that does not free us from the 
command to love. 
3 WHAT WE OUGHT TO AGREE TO AS A 

MINISTERIUM 

Growing out of last year's challenge, in our 
small groups, came the "Ethical Covenant" 
received by each man present. In a sense, it is 
the ministerium speaking to itself. And out of it 
come these recommendations: 

1. I have a concern about the ethical 
dimensions made by the districts that are 
excluding pastors and churches that do not 
embrace the "closed" position on church 
membership. I recommend that each district in 
a regular gathering pursue training in ethical 
decision making. 

2. I recommend that every effort possible be 
made to show "agape" love to those who have 
chosen to join with the CGBA. A tangible 
beginning might be for individuals to meet with 
individuals for prayer and fellowship, with no 
agenda other than to enjoy each other as 
brothers in Christ. 

John closed his message in prayer and 
dismissed us, but there was a thoughtful and 
hearty response to his challenge. 

"Do no less than be impeccable in character 
and full of integrity." 

MINUTES AND NOTES OF 
MINISTERIUM, July 28, 1994 

After Bernie Simmons and Ron Thompson 
led us in worship songs and choruses, Chaplain 
Dayne Nix led us in prayer. 



Ralph Colburn presented a motion that the 
minutes of yesterdays session be approved as 
printed in the "Epistle," with the additional name 
of Kurt Miller added to the membership list. The 
motion was seconded and carried. 

Ed Trenner announced that 100 are now on 
line with E-Mail around the world and in our 
delegate packets is further information on getting 
on board with this service through the BMH Co. 

Geneva Inman, President of WMC, 
announced a new program of the organization 
that will be tested by the West Penn District and 
requested our prayerfull interest and support. 

A motion was presented, and prevailed, that 
a copy of our Presidents message, along with 
the "ethical Covenant," be sent to the brothers in 
the CGBA, along with a cover letter by John 
Schumacher. 

Another motion prevailed that a copy of 
Pastor Jim Custer's conference address be sent 
to them also, with a cover letter by Jim. 

Ralph Colburn introduced the memorials for 
two more of our men now with the Lord, who 
probably were less known by us: Simon Toroian 
and Mark Benzie. Ed Lewis and Jim Custer, 
respectively, spoke briefly in their memory. 

Ralph then introduced this year's "Pastor of 
the Year," G. Forrest Jackson, and presented 
him with a plaque, a check for $500 and a 
special book compiled for the occasion by his 
three children. 

Chairman John Schumacher presented 
Pastor John Teevan, president-elect, as our 
speaker for the morning. 

He introduced Augustin Hibaile, a teacher in 
our seminary in the Central African Republic, to 
share a greeting from the pastors there to us. 

He then spoke from II Corinthians 3:18, 
reminding us that we can be transformed by 
what we see in that "mirror: and that we will 
reflect what we keep our eyes upon. He asked 
us, "Who are we as a Fellowship'' Where are 
we going''" Are we just 280-290 churches 
averaging 150 each in Sunday morning 
attendance, muddling along in our own way' Or 
are we a movement, capable of reflecting a 
great God'' Recent leaders have challenged 
and reminded us of important things: 
Tom Julien called us to a new strategy. 
Dave Plaster reminded us that God will fulfill His 



purpose, with us or without us! 
Wayne Hannah asked us to leave the past and 

look to the future. 
Bob Fetterhoff has called us to church planting 

around the world. 
Ed Lewis will call us to raise the standard higher 
John Schumacher reminded us that we are 
given a trust by our people and they deserve the 
best, as does God. 

God needs each of us, at our very best , 
beholding him, reflecting Him. 

We're beginning to run out of pastors, 
committed to effective ministry. If we do our job 
well, reflecting Him, we will attract others to 
serve Him in pastoral ministry. 

He shared a portion of a Garrison Keilor tape 
that was easy to identify with which illustrates all 
too well the weakness that comes from not 
reflecting well the glory of the Lord. 

Pastors today face a lot of pressure and 
pain. We need to unite in our mission and 
fellowship; serving one another in our 
membership. We need to RISE UP, be greater 
in accountability and godliness and service to 
one another, and above all, to Him. We need to 
lift the standard higher. 

To this end, President-elect Teevan 
announced the appointment of two committees: 
one to stimulate our members and one, a 
National Review Board, to help with ministers 
and ethics, and the other committee will help 
encourage and challenge our members to 
handle questions and appeals, and restoration. 

Chairman John Schumacher then introduced 
and inducted the new officers: 
President: John Teevan 
President-Elect: Ray Davis 
Secretary: Greg Ryerson 
Assistant: Tim Coyle 
(All serving two-year terms) 
Executive Secretary: Ralph Colburn (serving the 

last year of eight 3-year terms, retiring 1995) 
Assistant: Lee Dice 

Teevan announced that those interested in 
serving on either of the new committees were to 
contact him. Then he closed the session with 
prayer. 



Balance, Farmers and 

Merchants Bank, 7/12/93 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



$ 8,017.55 



Receipts: 

National dues $ 26,521 .00 

GBHMC 465.50 

Directory payments 12.00 

Alamo Rebates 3.92 

Chase Manhattan, close ... . 633.00 

Total Receipts $27,635,42 

TOTAL $35,652.97 



Disbursements: 

Exec. Secy. Salary $ 2,400.00 

Epistles 1,806.04 

Telephone & postage 167.58 

Ministerium expenses 750.50 

Conference expenses 1,983.84 

Pastor of the Year award .... 500.00 

Natl dues refund 50.00 

Scholarships (GBCE) 850.00 

Transfers to BIF 13,000.00 

Total $21,507.96 



Balance, F & M Bank, 7/14/94 . . $14,145.01 Disbursements: 

2 death gratuities @ $2500 . $ 5,000.00 

Balance, B.I.F., 7/12/93 109,637.08 Service charge 12.00 

Deposits for the year 13,000.00 Close account 633.00 

Interest for the year 5,876.70 TOTAL 5,645.00 

TOTAL 128,513.78 Account Closed, 2/10/94 

Withdrawals: Gift to Grace TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE 

Village Trustees 10,000.00 7/14/94 $112,650.78 

8 Death gratuities @ $2500 20,000.00 Decrease from last year 10,590.69 

Total 30,000.00 Dues payable exceed $7,000 

TOTAL IN B.I.F., 7/14/94 $ 98,513.78 

Balance, Chase Manhattan Respectfully submitted, 

Bank, 7/13/93 $ 5,594.85 

Interest for the year 50.15 

Total 5,645.00 Ralph J. Colburn, Executive Secretary 



© 



Western Region 

Includes Arctic District 
Hawaii District 




DISTRICTS: 

Allegheny 

- Arctic (Alaska) 

2 - Chesapeake 

3 - East Central Florida 

4 - Florida Suncoast 

5 - Great Lakes 

- Hawaii 

6 - Indiana 

7 - Iowa-Midlands 

8 - Mid-Atlantic 

9 - Mountain-Plains 



10 - Nor-Cal 

1 1 - Northcentral Ohio 

12 - Northeastern Ohio 

1 3 - Northern Atlantic 

14 - Northwest 

1 5 - Southern 

16 - Southern California-Arizona 

17 - Southern Ohio 

18 - South Florida 

1 9 - Southwest 

20 - Virginia 

21 - Western Pennsylvania 



46 



Central Region 



Eastern Region 



Cooperating District Conference Organizations 



ALLEGHENY 



Allegheny Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: Uniontown Grace Brethren 
Church 
April 28, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Joe Nass 

V. Mod. - Ron Jarvis 

Secy. - Millie Lund, Wind Ridge, PA 15380 

(412/428-5360) 
Asst. Secy. - Peggy Blough 
Treas. - Robert Riffle. RD 2. Box 106 

Washington, PA 15301 
Stat. - Larry Weigle 
Members-at-Large - Randy Haulk. Ron Thorn 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

Shimer Darr, Elda Philippi, Bob Grew 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Joyce Weigle, Don Lankey, Shirley Hostetler 

AUDITORS 

Dan Markey, Beth Yoders, Norma Jean 
McCracken 

CREDENTIALS 

John Lancaster, Randy Haulk, Nancy Miller 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Richard Cornwell, Robert Skeen, Harold 
Lowery 



GRACE BRETHREN MEN 

Pres. - Robert Grew 
V. Pres. - Robert Riffle 
Secy. - Robert Riffle 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Ruth Johnson 

1st V. Pres. - Elda Phillippi 

2nd V. Pres. - Kathy Opel 

Secy. - Mary Kay Nicholson, 419 Beachley St., 

Meyersdale, PA 15552 
Treas. - Joyce Weigle. R.D. 3, Box 35A. 

Stoystown, PA 15563 
Prayer Chairman - Norma Jean McCracken 
Asst. Prayer Chairman - Millie Lund 
Dist Editor - Becky Jarvis 

CAMP CORPORATION 

Manager - Shimer Darr 

Director - Larry Weigle 

Name of Camp - Albryoca 

Name of Campground - Camp Albryoca 

Location of Camp - R. 3, Box 92, Meyersdale. 

PA 15552. 

814/634-0023 

YOUTH 

President - Randy Haulk 
V. President - Ron Thoin 
Business Mgr - Ronzil Jarvis 
Asst. Business Mgr. - Larry Weigle 
Camp Coordinator - John Lancaster 
Member-at-Large - Darrel Taylor 



MINISTERIUM 

Chairman - Mike Lookenot 
V. Chairman - John Lancaster 
Secy./Treas. - Joe Nass 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chairman - Shimer Darr 
V. Chairman - John Lancaster 
Secy. - Richad Placeway 
Asst. Secy/Treas. - Ray McCoy 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chairman - Larry Weigle 

V. Chairman - Ronzil Jarvis 

Secy./Treas. - Joe Nass 

Asst. Secy./Treas. - Shimer Darr 

Additional Members - Dan Opel, Jim Kelley 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Accident. MD - First Grace Brethren 
Aleppo. PA - Aleppo Brethren 
Boswell. PA - Laurel Mountain Grace Brethren 
Coolville, OH - Coolville Grace Brethren 
Cumberland, MD - Cumberland Grace 

Brethren 
Grafton. WV - First Grace Brethren 
Jenners. PA - Jenners Grace Brethren 
Listie, PA - Listie Grace Brethren 
Meyersdale, PA - Meyersdale Grace Brethren 
Meyersdale, PA - Summit Mills Grace Brethren 
Parkersburg, WV - Grace Brethren 
Stoystown. PA - Reading Grace Brethren 
Uniontown, PA - Uniontown Grace Brethren 
Vienna, WV - Community Grace Brethren 
Washington, PA - Grace Brethren 
Westernport, MD - Mill Run Grace Brethren 



ARCTIC 



Arctic Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Luke Kauffman 

V. Mod. - John Gillis 

Secy. - Brian Chronister, 2511 Sentry Dr., 

Anchorage, AK 99507 (907/344-7780) 
Treas. - Chris Hay, 1509 Randee Way, 

Kenai, AK 9961 1 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Luke Kauffman 
V. Chm. - John Gillis 
Secy. - Brian Chronister 



Treas. - Chris Hay 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Luke Kauffman 
V. Chm. - John Gillis 
Secy.-Bnan Chronister 
Treas. - Chris Hay 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Anchorage, AK - Anchorage Grace Brethren 
Anchorage, AK - Grace Community 
Anchorage, AK - Greatland Grace Brethren 
Eagle River, AK - Eagle River Grace Brethren 
Kenai, AK - Kenai Grace Brethren 
North Pole, AK - North Pole Grace Brethren 
Soldotna, AK - Peninsula Grace Brethren 



CHESAPEAKE 



Chesapeake Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next Conference: Monthly meetings, no annual 
conference 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Ron Carnevali 
V. Mod. - Bob Trefry 
Secy. - Barry Goodson, 13000 Zekiah Dr., 

Waldorf, MD 20601 (301/645-0407) 
Treas. - Stephen Howell, P.O. Box 458, 

Owings, MD 20736 
Member-at-Large - Jeff Thomley 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Dave Kowalke, Howard Mayes, Barry Goodson 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Ron Carnevali 
V. Chm. - Bob Trefry 
Secy. - Barry Goodson 
Treas. - Steve Howell 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Ron Carnevali 



V. Chm. - Bob Trefry 

Secy. - Barry Goodson 

Add. Members - Bob Wagner, Jeff Thornley, 
Howard Mayes, R. Greene, Steve Howell, 
Wayne Hannah, David Kowalke 



Chm. 



DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Jeff Thornley 



YOUTH 

Pres. - David Knight 

V. Pres. - Mikal Smith 

Secy. - Nadine Leas, P.O. Box 458, Owings, 

MD 20736 
Treas. - Steve Howell 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Alexandna, VA - Grace Brethren 
Frederick, MD - Frederick Grace Brethren 
Lanham, MD - Lanham Grace Brethren 
Owings, MD - Calvert County Grace 

Brethren 
Richmond, VA - Fellowship Grace Brethren 
Richmond, VA - Richmond Grace Brethren 
Temple Hills, MD - Grace Brethren Church 

of Greater Washington 
Waldorf, MD - Waldorf Grace Brethren 



EAST CENTRAL FLORIDA 



East Central Florida District of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



Next Conference: Calvary Grace Brethren, 
Deltona. Date: May 6, 1995 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Ken Koontz 

V. Mod.- Ron Guiles 

Secy. - Mrs. Wendy Herzig, 637 Key Deer Ct, 

Apopka, FL 32703, (407/880-2349) 
Treas. - Mrs. Gerda Rench, 20 Carriage Hill 

Circle, Casselberry, FL 32707 
Stat. - Mrs. Glen Ernsberger, Melbourne, FL 



COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

Scott Kerr, Ted Boger, Bill Tweedale 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Jeffrey Dunkle, Bill Dragomir, Mike Champion 



Ron Guiles 



CREDENTIALS 



MODERATOR'S ADDRESS 

Ron Guiles, David Herzig, Jim Peacock 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Jeff Dunkle 
V. Chm, - Ken Koontz 
Secy./Treas. - Charles Davis 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Ken Koontz 

Add. Members - Charles Davis, Jeff Dunkle. 
Ron Guiles 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Ron Guiles 



V. Chm. - Ken Koontz 
Secy./Treas. - Jeff Dunkle 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Nancy Heldt 
Treas. - Gerda Rench 

GRACE BRETHREN MEN 

Pres. - Dick Hudson 
V. Pres. - Ted Boger 
Secy./Treas. - John Champion 

YOUTH 

Pres. - Mark L. Berkland 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Deltona, FL - Calvary Grace Brethren 
Gainesville, FL - Gainesville Grace Bible 

Fellowship Church 
Maitland. FL - Maitland Grace Brethren 
Melbourne, FL - Community Grace Brethrei 

Suntree 
Ocala. FL - Ocala Grace Brethren 
Orlando, FL - Fellowship of Our Savior 



FLORIDA SUNCOAST 



Florida Suncoast District of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



Add, Members - All other ordained pastors 
of the District 



Next Conference: Lakeland Grace Brethren 
April 30, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Dave Kennedy 

V. Mod. - Randy Weekley 

Secy. - Cheryl Byers, 3400 Gulf to Bay Blvd., 

Clearwater, FL 34619 (813/796-1747) 
Treas. - Bob Richards, 14969 Newport Rd., 

Clearwater, FL 34624 
Stat. - Evelyn Shane, 6639 Hammock Rd., 

Port Richey, FL 34668 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Randy Weekley, one member from each self- 
supporting church 

CREDENTIALS 

Evelyn Shane, two members from host church 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - George Traub 
V. Chm. - Ed DeZago 
Secy. - Bob Byers 
Treas. - Jim Poyner 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Randy Weekley 



DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Randy Weekley 
V. Chm. - George Traub 
Secy. - Bob Byers 
Treas. - Jim Poyner 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Lois McDevitt 

Secy./Treas. - Cheryl Byers, 3400 Gulf to B. 
Blvd., Clearwater, FL 34619 (813/796-17 

YOUTH 

Pres. - Dan Siegrist 
V. Pres. - Karen Keers. 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Bradenton, FL - Bradenton Grace Brethren 
Brooksville, FL - Brooksville Grace Brethren 
Lakeland, FL - Lakeland Grace Brethren 
Land O Lakes, FL - Home Missions Point 
North Port, FL - North Port Grace Brethren 
Palm Harbor, FL - Palm Harbor Grace 

Brethren 
Pinellas Park, FL - Pinellas Park Grace 

Brethren 
Port Richey. FL - Gulfview Grace Brethren 
Tampa, FL - Town & Country Grace Brethren 
Tampa, FL - Home Mission Point - Hispanic 



GREAT LAKES 



LEADERSHIP TEAM 

Chm. - Mick Rockafellow 

Secy. - Linda Erb, 3749 Brown Rd., Lake 

Odessa, Ml 48849, (616/374-7423) 
Treas. - Larry Henney 
Members-at-Large - Del Wagner, Jenni 

Klassen 

FAMILY MINISTRIES COMMISSION 

Chm. - Jenni Klassen, 

Mick Rockafellow, Linda Erb 

ADULT MINISTRIES COMMISSION 

Chm. - Del Wagner, 

Wayne Henney, Audrey Myers 



MISSIONS COMMISSION 

Arnold Erb 



COMMUNICATION COMMISSION 

Chm. - Bonnie Rockafellow, 
Pearl Shade, Bonnie Sennott 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Lake Odessa, Ml - Lake Odessa Grace 

Brethren Church 
Lansing, Ml - Lansing Grace Brethren Church 
Niles, Ml - Niles Grace Brethren Church 



HAWAII 



Hawaii District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



Next Conference: To be announced 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Garth Lindelef 

V. Mod. - Victor Wyman 

Secy. - Earl Young, 98-139 Olepe Loop, 

Aiea, HI 96701 (808/488-3180) 
Treas. - Ernest Shimizu 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - David Mitchell 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - David Mitchell 



V. Chm. - Nathan Zakahi 
Add. Members - Foster Tresise, Garth 
Lindelef 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Victor Wyman 

V. Chm. - Gabriel Marquez 

Additional Member - Mike Hashimoto 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Janet Shimizu 
Prayer Chm. - Sue Engle 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Aiea, HI - Waimalu Grace Brethren 

Ewa Beach, HI - Rainbow Grace Brethren 

Church of Ewa Beach 
Mililani, HI - Waipio Grace Brethren 



INDIANA 



Indiana District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



Next Conference: Grace Schools 
May 6, 1995 



Kokomo, IN 46902 
Stat. - Rick Horner, 5808 Council Ring 

Blvd., Kokomo, IN 46902 
Members-at-Large - Bob Arenobine, 

Mike Gatliff 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Ken Bickel 

V. Mod. - Dick Cron 

Secy. - David Rosner, 103 S. Willow St., 

Flora, IN 46929, (219/967-3020) 
Asst. Secy. - Carl Miller 
Treas. - Gerald Kelley, 318 Maple Ct., 



COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

Chm. - Jeff Hoffard 

Larry Richeson, Carl Miller 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Chm. - Dave Rosner 

Rick Horner, Jeff Hoffard 



AUDITOR 

Chm. - Jesse DeBoest 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Chm. - Charles Ashman 
Dick Cron, Bill Smith 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Carl Miller 
V. Chm. - Jeff Hoffard 
Secy./Treas. - Larry Richeson 



MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Charles Ashman 
V. Chm. - Al Edgington 
Secy./Treas. - Carl Miller 
Add. Members - All ordained men of the 
District Ministerium 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - none 

V. Chm. - Rick Horner 

Secy. - Bob Griffith 

Treas. - George Lord 

Add. Members - All Indiana Pastors 

GRACE BRETHREN MEN 

Chm. - Mike Cree 

Past Pres. - Chuck Cheek 

Secy./Treas. - George Lord, 601 Marston Ct., 

Fort Wayne, IN 46825 
Members-at-Large - Tom McKinley, 

Overholser 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Mrs. Vicki McNeal 

1st V. Pres. -Mrs. Kim Wilson 

2nd V. Pres. - Mrs. Barb Castator 

Secy. - Mrs. Cashel Taylor, 2145 S. Country 

Club Rd., Warsaw, IN 46580 
Corresponding Secy. - Miss Isobel Fraser, 

2217-1 C Point West Drive, Ft. Wayne IN 

46808 
Treas. - Donna Welborn, P.O. Box 623, 

Warsaw, IN 46581-0623 
Asst. Treas. - Mrs. Gwen Lord 
Prayer Chm. - Mary Stayer 
SMM Patroness - Linda Cline 
District Editor - Tish Carter 



SMM 

Coordinator - Bettie Horner 

Secy./Treas. - Karen Loher, 1570 Loher Ln., 

Warsaw, IN 46580 
Lumiere/Charis Coordinator - Rose McComas 
Resources - Vickie Rife 
Promotions - Ramona Ogle 
Rally Coordinator - Teresa Smith 

CAMP 

Director - Dave Jodry 

Sr. Conference Coordinator - Mike Gatliff 

Camp - Bear Lake Campground, RR 4, 

Albion, IN 46701 

(219/799-5988) 

YOUTH 

Chm. - Rod Finster 

Secy. - Dave Rosner, 103 S. Willow St., Flora, 

IN 46929 
Treas. - Robert Arenobine 
NAC - Jim Umpleby 
Communications - Dave Rank 
Quizzing - Georgia Bateson 
Rallies - Dan O'Deens 
SMM - Rose McComas 
Member-at-Large - Loren Felabom 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Berne, IN - Bethel Brethren 
Columbia City, IN - Grace Brethren 
Elkhart, IN - Grace Brethren 
Fishers, IN - Northeast Grace Brethren 
Flora, IN - Grace Brethren 
Ft. Wayne, IN - First Grace Brethren 
Ft. Wayne, IN - Grace Brethren 
Goshen, IN - Grace Brethren 
Indianapolis, IN - Eagle Creek Grace Brethren 
Kokomo, IN - Indian Heights Grace Brethren 
Kokomo, IN - North Kokomo Grace Brethren 
Leesburg, IN - Leesburg Grace Brethren 
Mishawaka - Miskawaka Grace Brethren 
New Albany, IN - New Albany Grace Brethren 
Osceola, IN - Osceola Grace Brethren 
Peru, IN - Peru Grace Brethren 
Sidney, IN - Sidney Grace Brethren 
South Bend, IN - Ireland Road Grace Brethren 
Warsaw, IN - Community Grace Brethren 
Winona Lake, IN - Winona Lake Grace 
Brethren 



IOWA-MIDLANDS 



Iowa-Midlands Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next Conference: Cedar Rapids 
June 9-10, 1995 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - John Burke 
V. Mod. - Robert Soto 

Secy. - JoAnn Coleman, 341 Crestridge Dr., 
Waterloo, IA 50701 (319/296-3127) 



Treas. - Harlan Perry, c/o Grace Brethren 

Church, Davenport 
Stat. - Gary Kochheiser, 2406 18th St. S.W. 

Cedar Rapids. IA 52404 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Scott Massey 

V. Shm. - Gilbert Hawking 

Secy/ Treas. - Ron Weimer 



1st V. Pres. - Phyllis Wessely 

Secy. - Carl Kochheiser 

Treas. • Rosella Hawkins, P.O. Box 33, 

North English, IA 52316 
Prayer Chm. - Shirley Burke 
SMM Patroness - Rose Earnest 

CAMP 

Director - Greg Straits 



MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Scott Massey 
V. Chm. - Gilbert Hawkins 
Secy. - Ron Weimer 

Additional Members - All ordained men of 
the District 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - John Mayes 

V. Chm. - Gilbert Hawkins 

Secy./Treas. - Jack Lesh 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Sue Schellenburg 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Cedar Rapids, IA - Grace Brethren 

Dallas Center, IA - Grace Brethren 

Davenport, IA - Grace Brethren 

Des Moines, IA - First Grace Brethren 

Garwm, I A • Carlton Brethren 

Hurst, TX - Grace Brethren 

Longview. TX - Grace Brethren 

McAllen. TX - Grace Brethren 

North English. IA - Pleasant Grove Grace 

Brethren 
Udell, IA - Udell Brethren 
Waterloo. IA - Grace Brethren 



MID-ATLANTIC 



Mid-Atlantic Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next Conference: Hagerstown, MD, April 21-22 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Kim Robertson 

V. Mod. - Ray Davis 

Secy. - Connie House, 38 Redwood Dr., 

Hagerstown, MD 21742 (301/797-5345) 
Asst. Secy. - Bonnie Poe 
Treas. - Ken Heetner, Mt. Vernon Terr., 

Apt. #8, Waynesboro, PA 17268 
Stat. - John Fitz, 16 S. Grant St., 

Waynesboro, PA 17268 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Chm. - Norman Mayer 

Alan Clingan, Roy Glass, Jay Fretz, Al 
Stroop 

COMMITTEE ON COUNCIL AND 
RECOMMENDATION 

Chm. - Richard Bell 

Roy Glass, Dave Manges, Carl Baker 

AUDITORS 

Don Gregory, Paul Hartman, Clarence Nissley 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Chm. - Roger Myers 

Carl Baker, Richard Bell 



MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Jay Fretz 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Roger Myers 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Roger Myers 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Lou Ann Myers 

1st V. Pres. - Alice Hartman 

Secy. - Connie House, 38 Redwood Dr., 

Hagerstown, MD 21742 
Treas. - Pat Stroop, Rt. 1, Box 1-A. 

Gerardstown, WV 25420 
Prayer Chm. - Sally Miller 
SMM Patroness - Shelby Oliver 

CAMP 

Director - Carl Baker 

Name of Camp - Camp Albryoca 

Location of Campground - Meyersdale, PA 

YOUTH 

Chm. - Roy Glass 

Secy. - Joyce Fitz, 16 S. Grant, Waynesboro. 

PA 17268-1516 
NAC - Ron Shank 
Quizzing - John Fitz 
Retreat Coordinator - Don Viebranz 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Chambersburg, PA - Grace Brethren 
Greencastle, PA - Conococheague Grace 

Brethren 
Hagerstown, MD - Calvary Grace Brethren 
Hagerstown, MD - Grace Brethren 



Hagerstown, MD - Maranatha Grace Brethren 
Hagerstown, MD - Valley Grace Brethren 
Martinsburg, WV - Rosemont Grace Brethren 
Winchester, VA - Blue Ridge Grace Brethren 
Winchester, VA - Grace Brethren 
Waynesboro, PA - Grace Brethren 



MOUNTAIN - PLAINS 



Mountain-Plains District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: Beaver City, Nebraska 
June 9-11, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Bob Juday 

V. Mod. - Bob Schaffer 

Treas. - Mack McDonald, 2375 Jet Wing 

Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 80916 
Stat. - Junior Caldwell, Rt. 1, Box 38 Portis 

KS 67474 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Same as Executive Committee 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Bob Juday 

V. Chm. - Bob Schaffer 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Bob Juday 

Add. Member • Tom Inman 



DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Tom Inman 



WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Rhonda Massie 

1st V. Pres. - Cathy Schaffer 

2nd V. Pres. - Dons Shrauger 

Secy. - Geneva Inman, 2244 Fernwood Dr., 

Colorado Springs, CO 80910 
Treas. - Naomi Huffman, 4825 Astrozon, 

#99, Colorado Springs, CO 80916 
Prayer Chm. • Vera Schlecher 
Distnct Editor - Linda Edgar 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Beaver City, NE - Grace Brethren 
Colorado Springs, CO - Grace Brethren 
Portis, KS - Grace Brethren 
Wichita, KS - Grace Brethren of Wichita 



NOR - CAL 



Nor-Cal Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next Conference: To Be Announced 
July, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Robert MacMillan 
V. Mod. - Stan Martin 

Secy./Treas - Joel Richards, 1315 La Loma 
Ave., Modesto, CA 95354 (209/523-3738) 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Glen Shirk 



Secy/Treas. - Joel Richards 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Paul Hoffman 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Auburn, CA - Auburn Grace Brethren 
Chico, CA - Chico Grace Brethren 
Modesto, CA - La Loma Grace Brethren 
Ripon, CA - Ripon Grace Brethren 
Sacramento. CA - River City Grace 

Community 
San Jose, CA - San Jose Grace Brethren 
Tracy, CA - Tracy Grace Brethren 



NORTHCENTRAL OHIO 



North Central Ohio Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next Conference: Delaware GBC, 
March 18, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod - Dan Allan 



V. Mod. - Steve Miller 

Secy. - Doug Forsythe, 706 Lynnfield Dr., 

Westerville, OH 43081-5059 
Asst. Secy. - Kevin Pinkerton 
Treas. - Oscar Stroede, 459 S. Grove St., 

Bowling Green, OH 43402 
Stat. - Pat Phillips 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Tony Webb, Todd Scoles, Don Buckingham 

CREDENTIALS 

Norman Johnson, Lyle Sweeney, Tim Reusch 

AUDITORS 

Bill Burke, Randall Nottingham, John Rowe 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Al Hockley, Darrell Anderson, Bill Hoffman 

RESOLUTIONS 

Brian Williams. Bob Belohlavek, Chip Heim 

MIMSTERIUM 

Chm. - Will Marling 
V. Chm. - Dan Travis 
Secy./Treas. - Larry Edwards 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Tony Webb 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. • Jeff Gill 
V. Chm. - Terry Hofecker 
Secy. - Dean Risser 
Treas. - Randall Nottingham 
Add. Members - Will Marling, Coordinator; 
Larry Edwards, Promoter 

GRACE BRETHREN MEN 

Pres. - Larry Michaels 
V. Pres. • Randy Myers 
Secy. - Marl in Rose 
Treas. - Morgan Burgess 
Pastoral Advisor - Jim Custer 
National Director - Roger Mills 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Ella Lee Risser 
1st V. Pres. - Mary Anna Atkins 
2nd V. Pres. - ZoeAnn Hockley 
Secy. - Lynette Myers 



Treas. - Ruth Berry 
Prayer Chm. - Betty Curtner 
SMM Coordinator - Oleda Hirsch 
District Editor - Sheryl Hawk 

CAMP 

Director - Don Wagner (1994) 
Name of Camp - NCO District Youth Camp 
Name of Campground - Hidden Hollow 
Location - Bellville, OH 

YOUTH 

Chm. - Bob Nicholson 

Secy. - Rob Barlow, Ashland GBC 

Treas. • Bob Doerr 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Ankenytown, OH - Grace Brethren 
Ashland. OH - Grace Brethren 
Ashland, OH - Southview Grace Brethren 
Bowling Green, OH - Grace Brethren 
Columbus, OH - Westerville Grace Brethren 
Columbus, OH - East Side Grace Brethren 
Columbus, OH - Southwest Grace Brethren 
Danville, OH - Grace Brethren 
Delaware, OH - Grace Brethren 
Dublin. OH - Northwest Chapel 
Fremont, OH - Grace Brethren 
Gallon, OH - Grace Brethren 
Lexington, OH - Grace Brethren 
London, OH - London Grace Brethren 
Mansfield, OH - Cornerstone Grace Brethren 
Mansfield, OH - Marion Avenue Grace 

Brethren 
Mansfield, OH - Woodville Grace Brethren 
Marion, OH - Grace Brethren 
Mifflin, OH - Grace Brethren 
New Albany, OH - Rocky Ridge 

Grace Brethren 
Pataskala, OH - Grace Brethren Church of 

Licking County 
Powell, OH - Grace Chapel 
Toledo, OH - Maumee Valley Grace Brethren 
Toledo, OH - Grace Brethren 



NORTHEASTERN OHIO 



Northeastern Ohio District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: Norton, OH 
April 22, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Doug Jensen 

V. Mod. - Charles Thornton 

Secy./Treas. - Joan Gable, 11849 Keener Rd., 

Orrville, OH 44667, (216/682-1922) 
Asst. Secy. - Doris Beichler 
Stat. - Dwight Stair, 510 Oak St., Wadsworth, 

OH 44281 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Chm. - Galen Wiley 

Robert Combs, Bud Olszewski 

CREDENTIALS 

Charles Thornton, Jayne Cole 

AUDITORS 

Dave Workman, Dale Widmer, Joann Sirlouis 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Chm. - John Snow 

Galen Wiley. Charles Thornton 



MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - George Johnson 
V. Chm. - John Snow 
Secy./Treas. - Doug Jensen 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Galen Wiley 

V. Chm. - Bud Olszewski 

SOCIAL ACTION 

Doug Jensen 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Ronald Boehm 
V. Chm. - Robert Combs 
Secy./Treas. - Dwight Stair 
Asst. Secy./Treas. - John Snow 

GRACE BRETHREN MEN 

Rep. to National Grace Brethren Boys - 
Elmer Gable 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Mrs. Doris Beichler 

1st V. Pres. - Barb Ayers 

2nd V. Pres. - Harlene Steiner 

Secy. - Donna Stair, 510 Oak St., Wadsworth 

OH 44281 
Treas. - Merle Romaine, 466 Boyd Ave., 

Akron, OH 44305 
Prayer Chm. • Mrs. Joanne Vandergrift 
SMM Patroness - Mary Beth Jensen 
Asst. Patroness - Carole Knop 
District Editor - Jacquie Jensen 



SMM 

Patroness - Mary Beth Jensen 
Asst Patroness • Carole Knop 

CAMP 

Jr. Camp Director - Bob Combs 

Sr. Camp Director - Steve Cisney 

Name of Camp - Camp Buckeye 

Name of Campground - Camp McPhearson 

Location - Danville, OH 

Phone Number - 614/599-71 10 

YOUTH 

Chm. - Jeff Bogue 

Secy./Treas. - Doug Courier, 625 Weber N.E., 

North Canton, OH 44720 
Other Members - Doug Jensen, Brent Gress, 

Dave Knzon, Mike Sessler 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Akron, OH - Ellet Grace Brethren 
Akron, OH - Fairlawn Grace Brethren 
Canton, OH - Grace Brethren 
Cuyahoga Falls, OH - Grace Brethren 
Homerville, OH - Grace Brethren 
Macedonia, OH - Western Reserve Grace 

Brethren 
Middlebranch, OH - Grace Brethren 
Millersburg, OH - Grace Brethren 
Minerva, OH • Grace Brethren 
Norton, OH - Grace Brethren 
Orrville, OH - Grace Brethren 
Rittman, OH • Grace Brethren 
Sterling, OH - Grace Brethren 
Wooster, OH - Grace Brethren 



NORTHERN ATLANTIC 



Northern Atlantic District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



Next conference: Pinebrook Bible Conference 
May 19-21, 1995 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Rick Clark 

V. Mod. - Kenn Cosgrove 

Secy./Treas. - Harold Jones 

Asst. Secy./Treas. - Steve Doutnch 

Stat. - David Allem 

Asst. Stat. - Joe Dilling 

Business Mgr. - Mark Saunders 

Asst. Business Mgr. - Joe Cosentino 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

Dave Allem, Larry Gegner, Bob Kulp 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Paul Mutch ler 



V. Chm. - Mike Brubaker 

Secy. - Tim Boal 

Asst. Secy./Treas. - Jim Brown 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Dan Eshleman, Vernon Harris, Randall Meyers 

CREDENTIALS 

Chm. - Kenn Cosgrove 

Ralph Robinson. Jon Tompkins 

AUDIT COMMITTEE 

Joe Cosentino, Harold Hollinger 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Kenn Cosgrove, Jerry Young, Roger Wambold 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Ken Cosgrove 
V. Chm. - John Smith 

PASTORAL ETHICS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Dan Eshleman, John Smith, Tom Avey 



DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Tim Boal 
V. Chm. - Dan Eshleman 
Secy. - Ken Cosgrove 
Treas. - Dan White 

Add. Members - All ordained and licensed 
elder with District credentials 

GRACE BRETHREN MEN 

Pres. - Stanley Mumma, Sr. 
1st V. Pres. - Rick Wells 
2nd V. Pres. - Ron Bair 
Secy. - Richard Snavely 
Asst. Secy. - Herman Snyder 
Treas. - Ray Derstine 
Asst. Treas. - Marvin High 
Pastoral Advisor - Dan Eshleman 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Sue Myers 

1st V. Pres. - Mary Ellen Leckrone 

2nd V. Pres. - Susan Haldeman 

Secy. - Judy Vance, 103 Green Spring Rd., 

York, PA 17404 (717/266-0110) 
Asst. Secy. - Bobbie Saunders 
Treas. - Arlene Ober, 4755 Bossier Rd., 

Elizabethtown, PA 17022 
Prayer Chm. - Peggy Nissley 
SMM District Coordinator - Jane Kurtz 
District Editor - Lisa Yordy 
Pastoral Advisor - Roy Roberts 

GRACE BRETHREN 
RETREAT CENTER BOARD 

Chm. - Robert Kern 

V. Chm. - Jim Bower 

Treas. - Jerry Goodpastor 

Secy. - Robert Riffle, 210 S. Oak St., 

Richland, PA 17087 
Director - Robert Lutz 
Board of Directors - Steve Doutrich, Lloyd 

Haldeman, David Humberd, Ken Keener, 

Randy Meyers, Martin Snavely, Harvey 

Stoneback 

CAMP 

Name of Camp - Camp Conquest 
Name of Campgrounds - Grace Brethren 

Retreat Center 
Location - 480 Forrest Road, Denver, 

PA 17517 
Phone - 717/336-2541 or 717/336-2006 



YOUTH COMMITTEE 

Chm. - Mark Saunders 

V. Chm. - Tim Placeway 

Secy. - Dennis Foreman, 12 S. Broad St., 

Lititz, PA 17543 
Treas. - Abner Zimmerman 

GRACE BRETHREN BOYS 

Chm. - Jim Charles 
V. Chm. - Dan Eaby 
Secy. - Bryon Crouse, R.D. 1, Box 302 

Myerstown, PA 17067 
Treas. - Carl Kaylor 
Pastoral Advisor - Vernon Harris 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Bethlehem, PA - Lehigh Valley Grace Brethren 
Blain, PA - Sherman's Valley Grace Brethren 
Denver, PA - Bread of Life Community Grace 

Brethren Church 
Dillsburg, PA - Hope Grace Brethren 
Elizabethtown, PA - Grace Brethren 
Ephrata, PA - Ephrata Area Grace Brethren 
Hartford, CT - Colonial Chapel Grace Brethren 
Hatboro, PA - Suburban Grace Brethren 
Hope, NJ - Hope Grace Brethren 
Irasburg, VT - Irasburg Grace Brethren 
Island Pond, VT - Island Pond Grace Brethren 
Lancaster, PA - Greater Lancaster Grace 

Brethren 
Lancaster, PA - Grace Brethren at Willow 

Valley 
Lititz, PA - Lititz Grace Brethren 
Manheim, PA - Manheim Grace Brethren 
Montgomeryville, PA - New Life Community 

Grace Brethren 
Myerstown, PA - Myerstown Grace Brethren 
New Holland, PA - New Holland Grace 

Brethren 
Newark, DE - Newark Grace Brethren 
Palmyra, PA - Palmyra Grace Brethren 
Philadelphia, PA - Crossroads Grace Brethren 
Philadelphia, PA - First Grace Brethren 
Philadelphia, PA - Liberty Grace Brethren 
Philadelphia, PA - Third Brethren 
Royersford, PA - Tn-County Grace Brethren 
Saratoga Springs, NY - Saratoga Springs 

Grace Brethren 
Telford, PA - Penn Valley Grace Brethren 
Tremont, PA - Echo Valley Grace Brethren 
Wrightsville, PA - Susquehanna Grace 

Brethren 
York, PA - York Grace Brethren 



NORTHWEST 



Northwest Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



Next conference: Aloha, OR, 
February 16-18, 1995 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Greg Stamm 
V. Mod. - Thorn Rowe 
Secy. - Dwight Cover, 1111 W. Third St., 
Grandview, WA 98930, (509/882-5083) 



Asst. Secy. - Mrs. Carol Johnson 

Treas. - Mrs. Jean Henriksen, P.O. Box 835 

Zillah. WA 98953 
Stat. - Ora Gifford. 708 Hillcrest, Grandview 

WA 98930 
Members-at-Large - Ken Ruppert. Leroy 

Sharpe 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

Jack Rants, Chuck Winter 

CREDENTIALS 

Thom Rowe, Jack Rants 

AUDITORS 

Don Cowles, Dale Hostetler, Kathy McGhan 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Greg Howell. Dale Hostetler, Dwight Cover 

RESOLUTIONS 

Jack Peters, Fenton McDonald 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Ken Ruppert, Dale Weaver, Don Williams, Ray 
Feather, Greg Stamm, Doug Deyo, Don 
Wosles 

MODERATORS ADDRESS 

Chm. - Dale Hostetler 
Fenton McDonald 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Fenton McDonald 
Secy./Treas. - Greg Howell 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Jack Rants 
Treas. - Dale Hostetler 
Additional Members - All Pastors and one 
layman from each church 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Greg Howell 

Additional Members - Dwight Cover, Greg 

Stamm, Ray Feather, Duane Jones, Fenton 

McDonald, Jack Peters 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Dee Schilperort 
1st V. Pres. - Edye Olsen 



2nd V. Pres. - Carol Bos 
2nd Co-V. Pres. - Ann Glover 
Secy. - Connie PifTord, 708 Hollcrest 

Grandview, WA 98930 
Treas. - Valerie Cowles, 360 Pecan Rd., 

Grandview, WA 98930 
Asst. Treas, - Eva Paul 
Co-Prayer Chm. - Nelda Dekker 
Distnct Editor - Carol Johnson 

MENS AND BOYS REPRESENTATIVE 

Lyle Taylor 

CAMP 

Directors - Lyle Taylor, Greg Stamm 

Name of Camp - Clear Lake Grace Brethren 

Camp 
Location of Campground - 11660 Tieton 

Road, Naches, WA 98937 
Phone - 509/848-2746 

CAMP BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Chm. - Mel Curfman 
Secy. - Lyle Taylor 
Treas. - Chuck Winter 
Merrell Darr. Don Williams, Doug Deyo, 
Ray Feather, Don Cowles, Greg Stamm 

YOUTH 

Chm. - Dwight Cover 

V. Chm. - Fenton McDonald 

Secy. - Elaine Pickett, 7410 W. Wapato Rd., 

Wapato, WA 98951 (509/848-2720) 
Treas. - Kathy McGhan 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Beaverton, OR - Grace Brethren 

Goldendale, WA - Community Grace Brethren 

Grandview, WA - Grace Brethren 

Harrah, WA - Grace Brethren 

Kent. WA - Grace Brethren 

Mabton, WA - Grace Brethren 

Mabton. WA - La Iglesia Evangelica de Los 

Hermanos 
Maple Valley. WA - Grace Bible Fellowship 
Sunnyside. WA - Grace Brethren 
Toppenish, WA - Grace Brethren 
Vancouver, WA - Friendship Grace Brethren 
Yakima, WA - Grace Brethren 



SOUTH FLORIDA - CARIBBEAN 



South Florida - Caribbean District of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: Quarterly Council Meetings 
every month with 5 Saturdays 



Mod. 



DISTRICT COUNCIL 

Rich Schnieders 



V. Mod. - Steve Shipley 

Secy. - David Rodgers. 1501 SE 7th St.. 

Okeechobee, FL 34974 (813/763-1858) 
Treas./Stat. - Ed Dearborn, 1509 SE 7th St.. 

Okeechobee. FL 34974 
Members-at-Large - Larry Zimmerman, Dan 

Thompson, Glenn Reinneger, Lee Freisen, 



Ellas Joseph, Randy Smith. Marvin Good, 
Joe Taylor, Chuck Hammering, Paul 
Manley, Durwood Brooks 

MINISTERIUM 
Chm. - Steve Shipley 
V. Chm. - Randy Smith 
Secy./Treas. - Rich Schnieders 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Randy Smith 

Additional Members - All ordained men In 
minlsterlum 

SOCIAL ACTION 

District Council Members 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Rich Schnieders 
Treas. - Marvin Good 



Additional Members - One Rep. from each 
district church 

CAMP 

Director - Steve Shipley 

YOUTH 

Pres. - Durwood Brooks 
V. Pres. - Steve Shipley 

Secy./Treas. - Steve Shipley, 2141 Crystal Dr . 
Ft. Myers, FL 33907 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Bassenger. FL - Grace Brethren Community 

Fellowship 
Ft. Myers, FL - Grace Brethren of Ft. Myers 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL - Grace Brethren 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL - Eglise Evangehque De 

La Grace (Haitian) 
Naples, FL - Shoreline Grace Church 
Okeechobee, FL • Grace Brethren 
Sebnng, FL - Grace Brethren 



SOUTHERN 



Southern District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: Grace Brethren of Greater 
Atlanta, April 29, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Steve Makofka 

V. Mod. - Jim Myers 

Secy. - Steve Taylor, 132 Summerall Ct., 

Aiken, SC 29801, (803649-3967) 
Treas. - Bob Carroll, 3079 Hidden Forest Ct., 

Marietta, GA 30066 
Stat. - Walt Joiner 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Steve Makofka 



Secy./Treas. - Don Soule 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. • Steve Taylor 

V. Chm. - Dean Fetterhoff 

Secy. • Don Soule 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Bill Kellerman 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Aiken. SC - Grace Brethren 
Anderson, SC - Grace Brethren 
Cary, NC - Grace Brethren 
Marietta. GA - Grace Brethren Church 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA - ARIZONA 



Southern California - Arizona District 
Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: Grace Church, Cypress 
May 21, 1995 

COUNCIL OF DIRECTORS 

Mod. - Terry Daniels 
V. Mod. - Robert Kliewer 
Treas. - Dallas Martin 
Stat. - Norm Schrock 
Members-at-Large - Jim Behrens, Ed 

Cashman, Neil Cole. Dave Marksbury. 

Phil Teran, Ed Trenner 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Chm. - Robert Miller 

Doug Bukowski, Mike Wallace 



MINISTERIUM 

Pres. - Tom Hughes 

V. Pres. - Ed Cashman 

Secy./Treas. - Ralph Colburn/ Richard Zuelch 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Robert Kliewer 

V. Chm. - Robert Miller 

Secy. - Phil Terran 

Additional Members - Ralph Colburn, 
Harold Dunning, John Mcintosh, 
Dave Marksbury, Ed Cashman, Tom 
Hughes 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Helen Miller, 13138 Michelle Circle, 

Whittier, CA 90605 
1st V. Pres. - Marjone Coburn 



2nd V. Pres. - Helen Remple 
Rec. Secy. - Joanna Selmanson 
Corresponding Secy. - Beverly Adams, 1541 

Flatbush Ave., Norwalk, CA 96050 
Treas. - Jayne Reuter 
Prayer Chm. - Berta Kuns 
Asst. Prayer Chm. - Margaret Berkemer 
Editor - Marian McBnde 
Luncheon Chm. - Lucille Hernandez 
Retreat Chm. - Jayne Reuter 

DISTRICT CHURCH PLANTING BOARD 

Chm. - Neil Cole 

Phil Heifer, Dave Marksbury, Chris Suitt 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Alta Loma. CA - Grace Brethren 
Beaumont, CA - Cherry Valley Brethren 
Bellflower, CA - Bellflower Brethren 
Cypress, CA - Grace Brethren 
Cypress, CA - New Life Grace Brethren 
Cypress, CA - Grace Church 
Gilbert, AZ - East Valley Grace Brethren 
LaMirada, CA - Creek Park Community 
LaVerne, CA - Grace Brethren 



Long Beach, CA - Community Grace Brethren 
Long Beach, CA - Grace Brethren 
Long Beach, CA - Grace Cambodian 
Long Beach, CA - Iglesia Evangelica de los 

Hermanos 
Long Beach, CA - Los Altos Brethren 
Menifee Valley, CA - New Hope Community 
Moorpark, CA - Grace Brethren 
Norwalk, CA - Grace Brethren 
Orange, CA - Grace Church 
Paramount. CA - Iglesia de los Hermanos 
Phoenix, AZ - Grace Brethren 
Rialto, CA - Grace Community 
Riverside. CA - Grace Brethren 
San Bernardino, CA • Grace Brethren 
San Diego, Ca - Grace Brethren 
Santa Ana, CA • Maranatha Brethren 
Santa Maria, CA - Grace Brethren 
Santa Paula, CA - Grace Brethren 
Seal Beach, CA - Grace Community 
Simi Valley. CA - Grace Brethren 
South Pasadena, CA - Grace Brethren 
Tucson, AZ - Silverbell Grace Brethren 
Westminster, CA - Grace Brethren 
Whittier, CA - Community Grace Brethren 
Yucca Valley, CA - Grace Community 



SOUTHERN OHIO 



Southern Ohio District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



MODERATOR'S ADDRESS 

Sam Baer, Darryl Ditmer 



Next conference: First Grace Brethren Church 
of Dayton, April 28-29, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Forrest Jackson 
V. Mod. - Ray Johnson 
Secy. - Mrs. Linda Penn, 5001 Fishburg Rd., 

Huber Heights, OH 45424 

(513/233-4324) 
Asst. Secy. - Mrs. Esther Trissel 
Treas. - Roy Trissel, 2624 Stonequarry Rd., 

Dayton, OH 45414 
Stat. - Forrest Jackson, 2624 Stonequarry 

Rd., Dayton, OH 45414 
Member-at-Large - Bob Poirier 

CREDENTIALS 

Forrest Jackson, Dave Brickel, Gerald Root 

AUDITORS 

Dick Edwards, Mike Lindsey 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Henry Mallon, Bob Poirier, Brian White 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Chuck Lawson, Greg Ryerson, Tad Hobert 

RESOLUTIONS 

Tim Shroyer, Don Coppock 



MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Scott Distler 
V. Chm. - Bob Foote 
Secy/Treas. - Tad Hobert 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Chuck Lawson 

DISTRICT RETIREMENT HOME 

Grace Brethren Village 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Greg Ryerson 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Arlene Smith 

CAMP 

Director - Sean Patrick 



Pres. - Sean Patrick 



COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Brookville, OH - Grace Brethren 
Camden, OH - Grace Brethren 
Centerville, OH - Grace Brethren 
Cincinnati, OH - Grace Brethren Church of 
Greater Cincinnati 



Clayhole, KY - Grace Brethren 

Clayton, OH - Grace Brethren 

Covington, OH - Friendship Grace Brethren 

Dayton, OH - Basore Road Grace Brethren 

Dayton, OH - Calvary Grace Brethren 

Dayton, OH - First Grace Brethren 

Dayton, OH - North Riverdale Grace Brethren 

Dryhill, KY - Victory Mountain Grace Brethren 



Huber Heights, OH - Grace Community 
Kettenng, OH - Calvary Brethren 
Lexington, KY - Grace Brethren 
Trotwood, OH - Grace Brethren 
Troy, OH - Grace Brethren 
Union, OH • Community Grace Brethren 
West Alexandria, OH - Grace Brethren 
Community 



SOUTHWEST 



Southwest District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: To Be Announced 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Mark Hussong 

V. Mod. - John Broadwater 

Secy. - Chris Galegor, Grace Brethren 

Nava|0 Ministries, Counselor, NM 8701! 

(505/568-4454) 
Treas. • Betty Clifton, Grace Brethren 

Navajo Ministries 
Stat. - Bill Clausen, P.O. Box 1169, 

Rancho de Taos, NM 87557 

MINISTERIUM 
Chm. - Steve Galegor 



Secy/Treas. - Bob Salazar 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Chris Galegor 

1st V. Pres. - Lana Clausen 

2nd V. Pres. - Marjone Neddo 

Secy. - Jane Hussong, Grace Brethren 

Navajo Mission 
Treas. - Manjyn Salazar, P.O. Drawer 1068, 

Taos, NM 87571 
Prayer Chm. - Betty Masimer 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Counselor, NM - Cedar Hill Grace Brethren 
Counselor, NM - Day Mesa Grace Brethren 
Counselor, NM - Counselor Grace Brethren 
Taos, NM - First Brethren Church 
Tonalea, AZ - Red Lake Grace Brethren 



VIRGINIA 



Virginia Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 



Next conference: First Brethren Church, Buena 
Vista, April 7-8, 1995 



Mod. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Dan Gillette 



V. Mod. - Brent Sandy 

Secy. - Danny Wright, 1511 Maiden Lane 

SW, Roanoke, VA 24015 (703/345-2788) 
Treas. - Les Cotsamire, 7005 Autumn Wood 

Ln„ Roanoke, VA 24019 
Stat. - Jerry Cox, 5693 Valley View Dr., 

Dublin, VA 24084 
Members-at-Large - Calvin Spradlin, Buddy 

Smals, Bill Clingenpeel 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Don Eshelman, Brent Sandy, Jerry Cox 

MEMBERSHIP 

Danny Wright, Bill Clingenpeel 

FINANCE 

Les Cotsamire, Calvin Spradlin 



PARLIAMENTARY 

Calvin Spradlin, Bill Clingenpeel, Buddy Smals 

RESOLUTIONS AND 
MODERATOR'S ADDRESS 

Brent Sandy, Bill Clingenpeel, Calvin Spradlin 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm. - Doug Witt 
V Chm. - Danny Wright 
Secy. - Ralph Molyneux 
Treas. - Don Eshelman 

FELLOWSHIP ADVISORY AND 
MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Chm. - Fred Devan 
V. Chm. - Lester Kennedy 
Secy. - Doug Witt 

Members-at-Large - All ordained elders 
actively serving pastorates in the district 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Chm - C.L Young 

Lester Kennedy, Bill Crotts, Raymond 
Huffman, Bill Hite, Don Field, Tom 
Guilhams, James Smals, Doug Witt 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - Brian Robinson 



V. Chm./Secy. - Lester Kennedy 
Treas. - Don Eshelman 
Additional Members - All ordained or 
licensed elders in the district 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres. - Evelyn MacDonald 

1st V. Pres. - Lois Gillette 

2nd V. Pres. - Sharon Fitzgerald 

Secy. - Martha Franklin 

Treas. - Cary Gilmer, 2330 Wycliffe Ave. SW 

Roanoke, VA 24014 
Asst. Treas. - Estelle Coffey 
Prayer Chm. - Margie Witt 
District Editor - Linda Smith 

CAMP 

Chm. - C.L. Young (703/562-2232) 
Managers - Mr, and Mrs. Webb 
Name of Camp - Camp Tuk-A-Way 
Name of Campground - Boiling Conference 

Grounds 
Location of Campground - 2262 Craigs 

Creek Rd., Catawba, VA 24070 
Phone Number - 703/552-9571 



YOUTH 

Pres. - Jess Truax 

Secy. - Patty Wilhite, 3058 Pebble Dr.. 

Roanoke. VA 24014 
Treas. - Pete Hite 
Additional Members - Fred Devan, Edith 

Staton, Danny Wright 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Boones Mill, VA - Grace Brethren 
Buena Vista, VA - First Brethren 
Covington, VA - Grace Brethren 
Johnson City, TN - Grace Brethren 
Radford, VA - Fairlawn Grace Brethren 
Riner, VA - Grace Brethren 
Roanoke, VA - Clearbrook Grace Brethren 
Roanoke. VA - Garden City Grace Brethren 
Roanoke. VA - Ghent Grace Brethren 
Roanoke, VA - Patterson Memorial Grace 

Brethren 
Roanoke, VA - Washington Heights Grace 

Brethren 
Salem. VA - Grace Brethren 
Troutville. VA - Grace Bible Brethren 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



Western Pennsylvania District Fellowship of 
Grace Brethren Churches 

Next conference: Camp Mantowagon, 
Saxton, PA, April 29, 1995 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mod. - Larry Sowers 

V. Mod. - Steve Blake 

Secy. - John Gregory 

Asst. Secy. - Delores Van Orman 

Treas. - Rodney Lingenfelter 

Stat. - Bill Hamill, 903 Millville Rd., Altoona, 

PA 16601 
Members-at-Large - Rick Strappello, Doug 

Sabin 

AUDITORS 

Chm. - Henry Russell, Randy Shaw 
Bob Frlck 

RULES AND ORGANIZATION 

Chm. - Don Rough 

Chet Sparzak, Jim Morton 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Chm. - James Laird 

Tim Waggoner, Larry Sowers, Steve Jarrell, 
Dave Miller 



CREDENTIALS 

Chm. - Steve Friddle 

Tom Goossens, Lee Seese 

MINISTERIUM 

Chm - Don Rough 
V. Chm. - Steve Jarrell 
Secy - Steve Blake 
Treas. - Norns Mason 

MINISTERIAL EXAMINING BOARD 

Exec. Secy. - Doug Sabin 
Asst. Exec. Secy. - Steve Blake 
Additional Members - All ordained elders in 
the district 

DISTRICT INSURANCE 

Mrs. Sue Mason, P.O. Box 145. 
Vintondale, PA 15961 

DISTRICT MISSION BOARD 

Chm. - James Snavely 
V. Chm. - Tim Waggoner 
Secy. /Treas. - George Swartz 
Publicity Chm. - Doug Sabin 
Additional Members - Other elders and 
laymen from the churches 

GRACE BRETHREN MEN 

Pres. - Rod Lingenfelter 



Secy. - Charles Miller, 1 165 Route 36 S, 

Duncansville, PA 16635 
Treas. - Harold Brumbaugh, P.O. Box 52, 

East Freedom, PA 16637 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY COUNCIL 

Pres, • Ruth Blake 

1st V. Pres, - Cindy Acker 

2nd V. Pres. (Acting) - Ruth Blake 

Secy. - Betty Gregory, 14 Donnertown Ln., 

Duncansville, PA 16635 
Treas. - Mrs. Joanne Beach, 309 E. Bell 

Ave., Altoona, PA 16602 
Prayer Chm. ■ Alice Pollard 
SMM Patroness - Nora Beltz 

Mary Ungenfelter 
Asst. Patroness - Gail Bndenbaugh 
District Editor - Gayle Ragley, Linda Johnson 

CAMP 

Dir. - Rick Strapello 
Name of Camp - Camp Mantowagon 
Location - Box 95, Scranton, PA 16678 
Phone Number - 814/658-3815 

DISTRICT YOUTH BOARD 

Pres. - Rick Daam 
V. Pres. ■ Lee Seese 
Secy. - Mrs. Mary Ungenfelter 
Treas. - Rick Stiftler 



NAC - Rick Daam 
Quizzing ■ Rick Stiffler 

COOPERATING CHURCHES 

Altoona, PA - First Grace Brethren 

Altoona, PA - Juniata Grace Brethren 

Armagh. PA - Valley Grace Brethren 

Avis, PA - Tiadaghton Valley Grace Brethren 

Conemaugh, PA - Conemaugh Grace Brethren 

Delmont. PA - Grace Community 

Duncansville, PA - Leamersville Grace 

Brethren 
Everett, PA - Community Grace Brethren 
Everett, PA • Everett Grace Brethren 
Export, PA • Murrysville Grace Brethren 
Hollidaysburg, PA - Vicksburg Grace Brethren 
Hopewell, PA - Hopewell Grace Brethren 
Johnstown, PA - Geistown Grace Brethren 
Johnstown, PA - Johnstown Grace Brethren 
Johnstown, PA - Pike Grace Brethren 
Johnstown, PA - Riverside Grace Brethren 
Johnstown, PA - Singer Hill Grace Brethren 
Kittanning, Pa - Grace Brethren Church of 

West Kittanning 
Martmsburg, PA • Grace Brethren 
Milroy, PA - Grace Brethren 
Saxonburg, PA - The Bible Church of Ivywood 
South Wilhamsport, PA - Grace Brethren 

Community 



Directory of Grace Brethren Churches 



Listing 276 churches in 30 states 



Listed by States; giving city, church name, membership as of January 1, 1994, address and 
telephone number; pastor's name and telephone number; and name and telephone number 
of recording secretary or clerk. 



ALASKA 

ANCHORAGE 

Anchorage Grace Brethren Church (272) 
Huffman and Pintail, 12407 Pintail St., 
Anchorage, AK 99516 

(907/345-3741) (FAX: 907/345-4241) 
Pastor: Luke Kauffman, (907/345-6493) 
Secy.: Gary Cam (907/344-4675) 

ANCHORAGE 

Grace Community Church (238) 
2511 Sentry Dr., Anchorage, AK 99507 
(907/344-7780) (FAX: 907/344-7187) 
Pastor: Brian Chronister 
Secy.: Cindy Leonard, (907/344-7780) 

ANCHORAGE 

Greatland Grace Brethren Church (53) 
3512 Robin St., Anchorage, AK 99504 

(907/333-2484) 
Pastor: E. John Gillis, (907/694-5331) 
Secy.: Tony Follett, (907/243-5814) 

EAGLE RIVER 

Grace Brethren Church (88) 

P.O. Box 770430, Eagle River, AK 99577 

(Mile 1.8 - S. Birchwood Loop) 

(907/688-4010) (FAX: 907/688-0834) 
Pastor: Maik Roberts 
Secy.: Mrs. Jill Lester, (907/694-8198) 

KENAI 

Kenai Grace Brethren Church (70) 
406 McCollum Dr.. Kenai, AK 99611 

(907/283-4379) 
Pastor: Chris Hay, (907/283-5789) 
Secy.: Mrs. Rhea Stables, (church phone) 

NORTH POLE 

North Pole Grace Brethren Church (23) 
(Mailing address: P.O. Box 56982, Silver 
Leaf and Newby, North Pole, AK 99705) 
(907/488-1789) 
Pastor: Davis Harbour, (907/488-1789) 
Secy.: Cindy Harbour, (church phone) 

SOLDOTNA 

Peninsula Grace Brethren Church (122) 
34640 Kalifornsky Beach Rd., Soldotna, AK 
99669 

(907/262-6442) (FAX: 907/262-6442) 
Pastor: Daniel Thornton, (907/262-1008) 
Secy.: Carmen Franchino, (907/262-8535) 



ARIZONA 



GILBERT 

East Valley Grace Brethren Church (4) 
P.O. Box 1266, Gilbert, AZ 85299 
Meeting at Chandler-Gilbert Community 

College, 2626 E. Pecos Rd., Chandler. 

AZ 85226 

(602/497-5619) 
Pastor: Michael Wallace, (602/497-5845) 
Secy.: Larry Johnson, (602/545-9857) 

PHOENIX 

Grace Brethren Church (77) 

2940 W. Bethany Home Rd. (just west of 

Interstate 17), Phoenix, AZ 85017 

(602/242-1885) 
Pastor: Kevin Zuber, (602/433-9520) 
Secy.: Mrs. Sandra Hurt, (602/841-4676) 

TONAL E A 

Red Lake Community Grace Brethren 

Church 
Box 108, Tonalea, AZ 86044 

(602/283-8908) 
Pastor: John Trujillo 

TUCSON 

Silverbell Grace Brethren Church (25) 
1477 N. Silverbell Rd., Tucson, AZ 85745 

(602/792-1114) 
Pastor: Kenneth A. Curtis, (602/792-1114) 
Secy.: Natalie Curtis (602/792-1114) 

CALIFORNIA 



ALTA LOMA 

Grace Brethren Church of Alta Loma (50) 
5719 Beryl St., Alta Loma. CA 91701 

(909/980-0727) 
Pastor: Neil Cole. (909/941-6998) 

AUBURN 

Auburn Grace Brethren Church (175) 
3126 Olympic Way, P.O. Box 6446, 

Auburn, CA 95603 

(916/823-8330) 
Pastor: Phil Sparling, (916/823-1223) 

BEAUMONT 

Cherry Valley Grace Brethren Church (87) 
10257 Beaumont, (Mailing address: P.O. 

Box 655) Beaumont. CA 92223 

(714/845-1821) 
Pastor: Robert Kliewer, (714/845-2551) 
Secy.: Mrs. Robert Wines 



BELLFLOWER 

Bellflower Brethren Church (317) 

9405 E. Flower St., Bellflower, CA 90706 

(310/925-6561) (FAX: 310/925-6564) 
Pastor: Tom Hocking, (310/634-3747) 
Secy.: Connie Cashman, (310/860-4576) 

CHICO 

Grace Brethren Church of Chico (46) 
1505 Arbutus Ave., Chico, CA 95926 

(916/342-8642) 
Pastor: Louie Ricci 
Secy.: Dorothy Yeater, (916/342-6749) 

CYPRESS 

Grace Brethren Church of Cypress (23) 
9512 Juanita, Cypress, CA 90630 

(714/826-6750) 
Pastor: Charles Covington 
Secy.: Scott Perkins, (310/863-9456) 

CYPRESS 

Grace Church (994) 

5100 Cerritos Ave., Cypress, CA 90630 

(714/761-5100 or 310/493-5613) 

(FAX: 714/761-0200) 
Pastor: Mick Ukleja 
Secy.: Tim Flaming, (714/995-8182) 

GARDEN GROVE 

New Life Grace Brethren Church 
12792 Valley View St., #218 

Garden Grove, CA 92545 

(714/895-6393) 
Pastor: David Marksbury, (714/379-0799) 
Secy.: Jim Terpening, (310/803-9595) 

LA MIRADA 

Creek Park Community Church (189) 
12200 Oxford Dr., La Mirada, CA 90638 

(310/947-5672) 
Pastor: Jim Behrens 
Secy.: Lynda Gunderson, (714/523-0398) 

LA VERNE 

Grace Brethren Church (141) 
2600 White Ave., La Verne, CA 91750 
(909/593-1204) (FAX: 909/593-6832) 
Pastor: Randy Peugh 
Secy.: Myca Lynn Poulos 

LAKEWOOD 

Iglesia Cristiana de la Communidad (27) 
11859 E. 209th St., Lakewood, CA 90715 

(319/865-9522) 
Pastor: Juan L. Arregin 

LONG BEACH 

Community Grace Brethren Church (122) 
5885 Downey Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805 

(310/634-1056) 
Pastor: Thomas Hughes, (310/630-7853) 
Secy.: Jan LaFleur, (310/421-5935) 

LONG BEACH 

Grace Brethren Church (1,211) 

3590 Elm Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807 

Meeting at: 36th and Under 

(310/595-6881) (FAX: 310/988-9391) 
Pastor: Louis Huesmann, (310/988-0453) 
Secy.: Gary Guacci, (310/433-5865) 



Grace Cambodian Church (138) 
3590 Elm St., Long Beach, CA 90807 

(310/423-6312) 
Pastor: Vannraith Khiev 

Iglesia Evangelica de los Hermanos (37) 
2590 Elm Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807 
Pastor: Alfonso Ramirez 

LONG BEACH 

Los Altos Grace Brethren Church (196) 
6565 E. Stearns St., Long Beach, 

CA 90815 (310/596-3358) 
Pastor: Phil Heifer, (310/866-4385) 
Secy.: Kathryn McNeely, (714/828-8847) 

MORENO VALLEY 

New Hope Community Church 
24610 Railroad Canyon Dr., Suite 10, 
Canyon Lake, CA 92587 
(909/244-2177) (FAX: 909/244-5038) 
Pastor: Chris Suitt, (909/656-2729) 

MODESTO 

La Loma Grace Brethren Church (139) 
1315 La Loma Ave., Modesto, CA 95354 

(209/523-3738) 
Pastor: Joel Richards, (209/538-4495) 
Secy.: Debra Sacuski, (209/575-0835) 

MOORPARK 

Grace Brethren Church 
5384 Kazuko Ct., Suite B, Moorpark, 

CA 93020 

(805/529-8185) 
Pastor: Tim Marlier, (805/529-9785) 

NORWALK 

Grace Brethren Church (90) 

11005 Foster Rd., Norwalk, CA 90650 

(310/863-7322) 
Pastor: Don Bowlin, (310/863-3213) 
Secy.: Mrs. Helen Adams, (310/868-6628) 

ORANGE 

Grace Church of Orange (94) 

2201 E. Fairhaven Ave., Orange, CA 92669 

(714/633-8867) 
Pastor: Ed Trenner, (714/538-2686 or 

714/633-2454) 

RIALTO 

Grace Community Church (47) 

690 W. Etiwanda Ave., Rialto, CA 92376 

(909/875-0730) 
Pastor: Roy L. Polman, (909/874-3526) 
Secy.: Marlene Fowler, (909/875-4271) 

RIPON 

Ripon Grace Brethren Church (193) 
734 West Main St., Ripon, CA 95366 

(209/599-3042) (FAX: 209/599-7344) 
Pastor: Glen W. Shirk, (209/599-4685) 
Secy.: Randy Gall, (209/599-2541) 



RIVERSIDE 

Grace Community Church (101) 
4247 Van Buren, Riverside, CA 92503 

(909/352-8685) 
Pastor: Brian Smith, (909/352-8714) 
Secy.: Gregg Starbuck, (909/689-9819) 

SACRAMENTO 

River City Grace Community Church (62) 
4261 Whitney Ave. (corner of Whitney and 

Eastern Aves.), Sacramento, CA 95821 

(916/972-1106) 
Pastor: Thomas Lynn, (916/725-9709) 

SAN BERNARDINO 

Mountainside Community Church (61) 
2050 Pacific Ave., San Bern., CA 92404 

(909/889-8695) (FAX: 909/888-3899) 
Pastor: J. Mark Booth, (909/862-1402) 
Secy.: Robert Gomez, (909/883-1152) 

SAN DIEGO 

Grace Brethren Church 

3455 Atlas St., San Diego, CA 92111 

(619/277-5364) 
Pastor: Philip Teran, (619/278-3715) 
Secy.: Colleen Teran 

SAN JOSE 

South Bay Grace Brethren Church (18) 
4610 Camden Ave., San Jose, CA 95124 

(408/448-7304) 
Pastor: Stan Martin, (408/269-1289) 

SANTA ANA 

Maranatha Grace Brethren Church 

(Spanish-speaking) (42) 
1704 W. First St., Santa Ana, 

CA 92703 

(714/541-9312) 
Pastor: Francisco Javier Peraza, 

(714/835-6697) 
Secy.: Alva Gonzales, (714/546-7935) 

SANTA MARIA 

Grace Brethren Church (54) 

223 E. Fesler, Santa Maria, CA 93454 

(805/922-4991) 
Pastor: John Graton, (805/922-9840) 
Secy.: Robert Sturley, (805/922-1617) 

SANTA PAULA 

Grace Brethren Church (27) 

107 S. 8th St., Santa Paula, CA 93060 

Mailing address: 9540 Telegraph Rd. #18, 

Ventura, CA 93003 
Pastor: Monty Martin 

SEAL BEACH 

Grace Community Church of Seal Beach 

(291) 
138 Eighth St., Seal Beach, CA 90740 

(310/596-1605) (FAX: 310/430-8770) 
Pastor: Donald Shoemaker, (310/598-5298) 
Secy.: Linda Strong 



SIMI VALLEY 

Grace Brethren Church of Simi VaJley (317) 
2762 Avenida, Simi Valley, CA 93065 

(805/527